Mark Philip Bradley's scientific contributions

Publications (3)

Article
MapsFiguresIllustrationsAbbreviationsPrefaceIntroduction1 Neo-colonialism as poison2 Renunciations of socialism3 Indigenising modernity in Nam Bo4 Reinventing modernity as threat5 Civilisation in the orchardConclusion EpilogueNotesBibliographyIndex

Citations

... Consequently, our effort here is to recall a longer-term history of colonial violence that is too frequently annexed, especially for international visitors, as a footnote to interpretations of the American War. Where Zinoman (2001a) provides an extensive historical study of French colonial use of imprisonment in Indochina, academic studies on memory, identity, and representation in post-conflict Vietnam have focused almost entirely on recollections of the American War and its aftermath (Nguyen 2017a;Kwon 2008;Schwenkel 2008). This understandable but significant bias is particularly true in relation to Vietnam's numerous museums and memorial sites. ...
... However, Thailand's diplomatic transformation, which aimed primarily at economic growth through regional reconciliation, was not well accepted by those states reluctant to move beyond their ideological ties. While many Western actors considered Thailand's vision too idealistic (Solomon 2000), regional actors and the Cambodian parties were opposed to Thailand's proposals and suspected that behind Thailand's revised diplomatic stance lay hidden motivations. For instance, China was strongly opposed to Thailand's plan for completely ending the coalition between the Khmer Rouge and other resistance groups. ...
... The rationale for selecting these study areas is that local agrarian communities have profound experiential knowledge of living with floods, forming an inherent part of their riverine lifestyles (Taylor, 2001). Long-term engagement with seasonal floods allows agrarian communities to accumulate flood memories and understand how flood changes affect their everyday lives and flood-based livelihoods. ...