Mark Griffiths's research while affiliated with Newcastle University and other places

Publications (6)

Article
This article critically examines thanato-geographies of Palestine-Israel and Palestinians and the crucial question of the possibility of politics in the context of sovereign exception. The main argument of the article is that bare life as referent for Palestinians’ lives overstates the subject-making capacities of the sovereign and understates the...
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This article sets the gendered effects of low-wage, cross-border labor in Palestine within a global frame of uneven development. Drawing on fieldwork close to Checkpoint 300, between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, we first provide an account that centers Palestinian women’s social reproduction as coconstitutive of male cross-border employment in the Isra...
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Attending to connections between serious health conditions (cancers and congenital disorders) and weapons residues in Iraq, Afghanistan and Gaza, this article develops a geographical agenda for examining power in late modern war from the perspective of the ground and the life it sustains. A case is made for understanding the time-spaces of war as n...
Article
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The objective of this article is to bring Palestinian women to the centre of a discussion about the gendered dimensions of Israel’s convoluted permit system and checkpoint security infrastructure. Drawing on fieldwork close to one of the largest checkpoint terminals in the West Bank, Checkpoint 300 between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, the article devel...
Article
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This article brings women to the fore of a discussion of checkpoints in Palestine to understand better the ways that Palestinian women’s lives—even as they may not regularly cross checkpoints—are affected by Israeli security infrastructure. Drawing on fieldwork near Checkpoint 300 between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, we examine women’s lives in the con...

Citations

... Overall, women within the family creatively reinvent and give sense to engendered norms and practices as a form of resistance to masculine oppression and violence, mobilizing agentic behaviors, and social relations as a protective factor against mental distress and low life satisfaction. Reinventing intimacy, parenting, and marital relationships, women settle an active role in a society resisting external colonial powers that undermine the indigenous collective identity and individuals' existence (Griffiths & Repo, 2020). Simultaneously, performing relational and social capabilities in the family and the community spheres, women take the position of active social actors in a society that suppresses the feminine voices over masculine rules (Baloushah et al., 2019b). ...
... The enquiry here builds from the base observation that the case at hand brings together bureaucracy, mobility and colonialism in a geographically distinct way. While Israel's 'domestic' control over Palestinian borders and mobilities is the subject of a well-developed body of scholarly workfor example, on closure, checkpoints and daily routines (Griffiths & Repo, 2020;Hammami, 2015;Peteet, 2016Peteet, , 2017)whose intersections with bureaucratic practices are similarly well-documentedfor example, on permits (Berda, 2017) and travel documents (Tawil-Souri, 2012)the issue of visa restrictions is distinctive for the fact that internationals 1 are caught within the colonial mobilities bureaucracy that governs the population of Palestine. The particularity of the case bears explication: citizens of the historical metropoles (United States, UK, European Union (EU) states) are subject to contemporary practices of colonial bureaucracy that are marked by the logics of denial and removal. ...