Mark Gamsa's research while affiliated with Tel Aviv University and other places

Publications (19)

Article
This article addresses population movements across the Amur and the Ussuri River borders between Russia and China. It analyses the history of border crossing in this region from Russia’s acquisition of the Amur and Maritime provinces from the Qing Empire in 1860 to the present time, with a focus on the 1920s and 1930s. The article’s first part demo...
Article
Beyond the Steppe Frontier: A History of the Sino-Russian Border By Sören Urbansky. Princeton University Press, 2020. 367 pp. $39.95 (cloth). - Mark Gamsa
Article
Alyssa M. Park Sovereignty Experiments. Korean Migrants and the Building of Borders in Northeast Asia, 1860–1945. [Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute.] Cornell University Press, Ithaca (NY)2019. xviii, 284 p. Ill. Maps. $49.95. (E-book: $24.99). - Volume 65 Issue 1 - Mark Gamsa
Article
This article aims to uncover the lives of some of the individuals who, through the occupational and personal choices they made, moved between the Chinese and Russian societies of Manchuria (Northeast China) in the first half of the twentieth century. The Chinese Eastern Railway, which passed through the region and was central to its economy, provid...
Article
Chzhungo means “China” in Chinese, and Tret'iakov’s book by this unusual title was the outcome of his living and teaching in Peking during 1924 and 1925. It was first published in 1927. A second revised and amplified edition came out in 1930, but after the author's execution in 1937 his books disappeared from Soviet libraries. Very few copies of ei...
Article
This article compares two clusters of polemical language. One is comprised of critical uses of the term “Asiatic” in Russian political discourse from the 1890s to the 1910s. The other is Chinese usage, in the 1920s and 1930s, of the term “Zhina,” a Japanese version of “China” which was perceived as injurious to Chinese national pride. The article t...
Chapter
This chapter pursues two aims: those of fact-finding and of understanding the image of mixed marriages in the eyes of Chinese and Russian observers. We begin with the fact-finding: how widespread was “mixed” marriage between Russian and Chinese nationals in Manchuria, from the beginning of Russian presence there in the 1890s to its near end by the...
Article
Historical studies of the Baltic littoral have grown more numerous lately in what may perhaps be called the second wave, following publications that greeted the independence of the three Baltic states in 1991. No longer pressed to respond to that momentous event—still less to celebrate it—current research takes advantage of the distance to achieve...
Article
To adopt the least contentious of several definitions, the currents of thought and motifs in the arts that we associate with the Renaissance had their beginnings in fourteenth-century Florence. By the end of the fifteenth century they had spread out to other Italian cities while, during the sixteenth century, the Renaissance became a cross-European...
Article
Scholarship on the relationship between China and Russia has largely focused on the political and ideological realms, neglecting cultural and social factors. Beginning with some general points about the role of 'the cultural' in interstate politics, this article assesses the cultural dynamics of Chinese–Russian relations during the first half of th...
Article
The writer, poet and dramatist Sergei Tret'iakov was a central figure of the early Soviet literary and artistic avant-garde. Born in 1892 in Kuldiga, a town in what is now Latvia and was then the Governorate of Courland, one of the three Baltic provinces of the Russian empire, he was educated in prerevolutionary Riga and Moscow. Fluent also in Latv...
Article
Like other commodities, books have both a material and a sociosymbolic life, whose inherent integration has been too often ignored. Comparative literature and translation studies do not grant sufficient importance to the physical life of the book. Analyses of translation often fail to acknowledge that the (historical) journey by which the book trav...
Article
This article argues that historians have largely neglected the dimension of Chinese–Russian interaction, which was central to the development of Harbin from the emergence of this city in 1898 as an outpost of imperial Russia in Manchuria (north-east China). It goes on to propose a new approach to Harbin history, which, integrating its ‘Russian’ and...
Chapter
The Chinese writers who, looking for direction to the West in the 1910s and 1920s, rebelled against the aesthetics and preoccupations of traditional Chinese literature, nonetheless accepted the age-old premise of literature as the conveyer of morality. Certainly, most of them would argue that their Dao (as in the formulaic expression wenyi zaidao,...
Chapter
Since the days of Thucydides, the Western mind was trained in the distinction between two “ways of talking”: the mythical/fictional, in which (to give an example closer to our time) Sherlock Holmes lived in Baker Street, and the historical/truthful, in which he did not exist.1 In traditional China, the cultural prestige of history (shi) was always...
Article
This article presents four main approaches to research on the dissemination of Marxist ideology in China: those of intellectual history, political or social history, history of religion and discourse analysis. Rather than argue for the theoretical applicability of the term ‘political religion’ to the case of China under the rule of Mao Zedong (1949...

Citations

... We don't win anymore. (Colorado Springs, CO, October 18, 2016) According to communication scholars, deprecation is commonly used to frame the speaker as a savior (Biegon, 2019;Gamsa, 2017), which is how it was applied by Trump. While he framed America as currently losing, he pitched himself as the one to turn it around: ...
... Against this wider socio-historical context, the history of Russian-Chinese romantic encounters is closely intertwined with the imperial ambitions of the Chinese and Russian rulers at the end of the 19th century, resulting in mass migrations of people to the areas now known as Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, Manchuria, and the Russian Far East (Gamsa 2014). In the Russian system of governance there is no official recognition of these historical processes, nor is there any acknowledgement of crimes committed against ethnic Chinese living in the border areas during the Russian expansion to the East. ...
... Their reality as part of mixed religious and national urban societies emphasized the impact of the war on the changing circles of social identity, or social identification. 7 The term "identity" is problematic, especially when referring to changes in self-identification within changing social boundaries. 8 The paper focuses primarily on the changes in social consciousness, particularly the placement of the social discourse within the framework of the national discourse. ...
... The German historian Bernd Roeck (2017) recently endeavoured to provide a definition of the Renaissance from a cultural transfer and global-historical perspective by approaching the Renaissance as the result of a process of circulation involving the whole inhabited world. Roeck's successful work, which builds on an entire body of recent publications on the topic (Gamsa 2013;Blitstein 2021;Maissen and Mittler 2018), will provide a central common thread for the contribution we aim to make in this chapter. The balance he establishes between synchronic and diachronic circulation is an invitation to use a figure familiar to rhetoric 1 but not so deeply rooted among historians, that of the palimpsest. ...
... Secondly, unlike locals born before 1990 who tend to regard colonial heritage as the colonisers' heritage which represents an Otherness, those born afterwards are more likely to accept the Russian-built buildings as their own heritage, and value them as an essential part of the city. In the mid-1990s, research on Harbin's pasts in the PRC finally moved away from the heavily politicised tone which reaffirms the Communist doctrine (Gamsa, 2010), and the younger generations were, therefore, educated in a different way which abandoned the stringently ideological prism. These younger generations do not place the Russians and the Chinese in opposition to each other but put them into the historical context and see Harbin's colonial past from an integrated perspective. ...