Mark Bernstein's research while affiliated with National University of Singapore and other places

Publications (14)

Article
It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 18th International ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 'Hypertext, The Web, and Beyond: Five Autonomous Programmes, One Unified Conference'. The conference takes place in the Manchester Museum in Manchester, UK. The museum is located within the University of Manchester campus in the centre of Ma...
Article
Full-text available
Sculptural hypertext is proposed as an alternative domain for hypertext writing, proceeding chiefly by the removal of links rather than by adding links to an initially unlinked text. Relatively little is known about authoring sculptural hypertexts. This paper examines some issues that arise in the course of composing sculptural hypertexts and propo...
Conference Paper
Though Nelson gave us "hypermedia" practically in the same breath as "hypertext," initial literary explorations of hypermedia stuck fairly closely to verbal models. Over the last five years this bias has begun notably to decay. As poets, graphic, and narrative artists become more familiar with powerful end-user tools like Macromedia Flash, and as t...
Conference Paper
Storyspace, a hypertext writing environment, has been widely used for writing, reading, and research for nearly fifteen years. The appearance of a new implementation provides a suitable occasion to review the design of Storyspace, both in its historical context and in the context of contemporary research. Of particular interest is the opportunity t...
Conference Paper
Although most theory and research in the hypertext community has been directed toward systems and implementations with fairly conventional patterns of authorship, hypertext as it has evolved on the Internet contains a number of stranger species: Web logs (or "blogs") that consist largely of citations or pointers to other Web content; reader-writeab...
Conference Paper
Sculptural hypertext is proposed as an alternative domain for hypertext writing, proceeding chiefly by the removal of links rather than by adding links to an initially unlinked text. Relatively little is known about authoring sculptural hypertexts. This paper examines some issues that arise in the course of composing sculptural hypertexts and propo...
Conference Paper
The term "Sculptural Hypertext", coined by Mark Bernstein in his Hypertext '01 paper "Card Shark and Thespis," refers to a style of writing hypertext where the document author starts with a massively connected structure, and the task of authoring links consists of cutting away those links that are not wanted, much as someone sculpting in stone in t...
Conference Paper
Card Shark and Thespis are two newly-implemented hypertext systems for creating hypertext narrative. Both systems depart dramatically from the tools currently popular for writing hypertext fiction, and these departures may help distinguish between the intrinsic nature of hypertext and the tendencies of particular software tools and formalisms. The...
Article
Early hypertext theory viewed disorientation as a grave obstacle to effective hypertext, and often prescribed the used of simple, formal structures. The evolution of hypertext writing, especially literary hypertext, indicates that navigational anxiety may be misplaced. A rich vocabulary of structural motifs in current hypertext writing, spawning ne...
Article
The STOP methodology, like contemporary hypertext theory, arose from a confluence of novel technological and literary ideas. While the engineering and literary factors that shaped STOP are very different from those that shape hypertext, the similarities between the STOP prescription and contemporary hypertext design are striking.

Citations

... His seminal work on the patterns of hypertext [4] identified repeating structures within this space and established a vocabulary for representations of hyperfiction. Similarly, he, alongside Weal and Millard (who developed their own system on top of the FOHM model in Auld Leaky [30]), identified the key differences between the classical calligraphic structural approach (wherein pages are connected by links) and the sculptural approach (wherein conditional guard fields and state changing functions govern the way in which links are prevented/sculpted away) [5,7]. More recently, Bernstein has combined the ideas of calligraphic and sculptural structures in his latest version of StorySpace [6]. ...
... Hypercard [8] used a card/stack metaphor, with authors creating links between cards within a stack of cards. Currently, the standard approach taken by hypertext authoring tools is to explicitly represent the nodes and links of the hypertext work in a " map " view (e.g., Storyspace [4], Intermedia, [9] Tinderbox [5] and Notecards [22]). Tools such as Storyspace often provide several alternative views of the work, such as a chart view, an outline view, and a " treemap " view. ...
Citing conference paper
... – General information (dates, deadlines, course material, . . . ): They are managed in form of a WIKI [Moulthrop, Bernstein and Carton 2002] , which allows instructors and their tutors to keep the information up-to-date in a simple, collaborative manner. ...
... It is ironic, then, that the blatant hyperlink is generally derided in the literature. Mark Bernstein, who is particularly dismissive of descriptive links, suggests that "if links lie no one will trust them, if links are candid no one will follow them" [50], while Wendy Morgan calls such work a "perverse structuralist attempt to tidy into boxes what of its nature resists such tabulation" [43]. Equating hypertext with "the kind of pleasurable disorientation that one finds in Dante's Divine Comedy, Browning's Ring and the Book, and Eliot's The Waste Land", Landow suggests that both represents a "source of pleasure" to the expert, and "unpleasant confusion" to the neophyte [51]. ...
... Barthes' argument, which called for a revised approach to criticism rather than a new medium, was nonetheless misrepresented as materialist by first wave criticism, rather than as the chastisement of intrusive critics and authors originally intended. Recall the narrator in John Fowles' The Magus: wryly reflecting on his dilettante Existentialist supper club, he recalls their mistaking "metaphorical descriptions of complex modes of feeling for straightforward presentations of behaviour" [71]. Despite a shared language of networks and lexia, Barthes offered only an approach to authorial privilege, not a blueprint for its eradication. ...
... e to re-develop similar authoring tools to improve on functionalities previous tools were either not offering or did not consider (De Bra et al., 2016;Göbel et al., 2008), e to experiment with patterns of hypertext in narratives (Bernstein, 2001), e to explore new story development tools (Hooper and Weal, 2005), e to simplify the authoring process (De Bra et al., 2016;Foss and Cristea, 2010), e to improve on authoring issues discovered on previous tools (Smits and De Bra, 2011). ...
... Storyplaces is considered a hypertext tool like Storyspace. Unlike Storyspace which is tagged calligraphic, a term by Bernstein (1999) because it uses hyperlinks to connect nodes of text, Storyplaces is tagged as a sculptural hypertext tool an additional term by Bernstein et al. (2002) because nodes are already placed in the environment and connections between them are removed while a reader traverses a story . ...
... This requires manual inspection of each content item to whether it conforms to accessibility guidelines or not. This direction produces more detailed, precise, and exhaustive results than auto-evaluation tools, considering the usability aspect as well [32]. However, this approach takes time, and recruiting accessibility domain experts is not a cost-effective option [28]. ...
... Kolb [204] juxtaposes similar and inter-related content in book and Web form, to investigate the differences of the experience 26 . Extending from the 'Card Shark' narrative idea comes the notion of Sculptural Hypertexts [51] [251] the formalism of which has since been incorporated in Storyspace (v3), aiding exploration of that type of hypertext. ...