Marina Vujnovic's research while affiliated with Monmouth University and other places

Publications (14)

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In this chapter, we focus more squarely on related predatory mechanisms of racialized disaster patriarchal capitalism in the pandemic higher education space. Promoting the narrative that students deserve “the college experience” as a way to justify maintaining, and in some cases, increasing revenue streams, global education executives, college and...
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In this chapter, we focus on academic labor cost and control strategies that U.S. college and university administrators took during COVID-19 that were presented as pandemic austerity measures, but had precipitating factors and deeper roots in “workforce reduction plans.” We argue that such austerity measures have been displaced and have exacerbated...
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In this chapter, we show how an already severely weakened commitment to academic shared governance was further undermined during COVID-19 through the workings of “pandemic task forces” established on campuses around the country that often served as vehicles to carry management agendas under the guise of “faculty consultation.” We examine a disturbi...
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In this chapter, we take the long view of the history of higher education in the U.S. to better explain the magnitude of what happened in the COVID era, how it came to be possible and why. We review key moments in the trajectory of the re-engineering of the university as an arm of business and show that the metamorphosis began as early as the First...
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In this chapter, we argue that the rise of the global education industry, with the goal of capturing the academic mission and markets of postsecondary education as a central target, is a core component of the pandemic disaster capitalism engine in higher education. We introduce our notion of a network of privatized interests we call global total ed...
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In this final chapter, we summarize the main findings of the book and conclude that as a set of institutions that serve to reproduce class, gender, and racial structures in the interests of dominant groups, higher education is not in ruins. The accelerated reorganization of higher education has been a boon for the global elite, both before and duri...
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In this chapter, we argue that, driven by the threat of eroding enrollments and guided by perverse college ranking incentives, academic management executives capitalized on pandemic upheavals and uncertainty by adding market-driven academic programs, most commonly masters’ degrees, and pushing for other market-driven changes, such as microcredentia...
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In this chapter, we argue that the ongoing transformation of American higher education by educational technology, finance, and management corporations to establish and expand online instruction is a key ingredient of the toxic soil in which so-called pandemic necessary responses took root. We look closely at one of the most widely promoted educatio...
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In this chapter, we turn our gaze to campus reopening plans and COVID mitigation strategies enacted by colleges and universities in the early months of the pandemic. We found that higher education administrators’ pandemic responses were consistent with concerns for institutions’ bottom line, expressed largely in fears of losing enrollment, rather t...
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In this chapter, we introduce the book’s central thesis that global education corporations along with higher education administrators in the U.S. and other Western democracies seized on the COVID-19 pandemic as an opportunity to further advance a neoliberal education agenda consistent with the principles and practices of “disaster capitalism” (Klei...
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In this chapter, we examine the relationship between pandemic tuition increases and student debt, the latter not only an American experience but a growing global concern. In the midst of the fight against COVID, many administrators in the U.S. decided to increase tuition for students and their families, in many instances, several times over, in wha...
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At center stage in this chapter is the catastrophic rise of online program management corporations (OPMs), and how, under the cover of the pandemic, educational investors continued to search for more politically palatable vehicles to extract profit from the increasing numbers of students seeking social mobility. We explore the concept of the edu-po...
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In this chapter, we discuss the ways in which COVID-19 created a different kind of pandemic opportunity for faculty, students, and staff to resist the expansion of neoliberal policies and practices in higher education. We highlight student actions across the nation; labor actions by campus essential workers; the increasing unionization and mobiliza...