Marina Burt's research while affiliated with SUNY Ulster and other places

Publications (17)

Book
Full-text available
During our own initiation as language teachers (Oller, at first in Spanish and French, and later ESL; Richard-Amato, in ESL), we heard plenty about "the subtle difficulties of language instruction," but we heard considerably less about success in surmounting those difficulties. Coursebooks and especially anthologies tended to deal primarily with pr...
Article
This paper focuses on previously overlooked subpopulations of limited English proficient (LEP) students – “English-superior” and “equally-limited” LEP students. These students are defined in terms of their relative proficiency in English and the home language, a procedure that also yields the “non-English-superior” student group, whose needs most c...
Article
According to the Survey of Languages Supplement to the July 1975 Current Population Survey, more than 7.6 million school age students in the United States live in households where languages other than English are spoken. Given these language environments, one's degree of bilingualism may theoretically range from a point approximating monolingualism...
Article
A new perspective is outlined on the creative construction process in second language acquisition. First, an attempt is made to use Brown's notions of semantic and linguistic complexity to account for differences between first and second language acquisition orders. Second, the notions “learning complexity” and “learning strategy” are clarified. Th...
Article
Full-text available
The study attempts to determine whether the syntactic errors children make while learning a second language are due to native language interference or to developmental cognitive strategies as has been found in first language acquisition. 513 utterances containing errors were extracted from the natural speech of 179 children, 5-8 years old, learning...
Article
Full-text available
The acquisition sequences of 11 English functors were compared for native Chinese- and Spanish-speaking children learning English. Three different methods of speech analysis used to obtain the sequences are described in detail. All three methods yielded approximately the same sequence of acquisition for both language groups. This finding provides s...
Article
Two research studies on child L2 acquisition were conducted sequentially over the last year. The first study used comparative error analysis to determine whether the actual L2 errors children make can be accounted for by “creative construction” or “habit formation.” The findings provided the impetus for the second study which compared the sequence...

Citations

... In the seventies, studies of transfer, shaped up to that time predominantly by the behaviorist paradigm, went into temporary eclipse. The rise of cognitive psychology and Chomskian linguistics led to approaches in second-language acquisition research that emphasized the learners' active and creative construction (e.g., Dulay & Burt 1974, 1975). However, since the existence of cross-linguistic influences is undeniable, the reconceptualization of transfer as a process within a cognitivist paradigm soon followed, and during the last few years cross-linguistic phenomena have received increasing attention (e.g., Gass & Selinker, 1983; Kellerman, 1979 Kellerman, , 1986 Kellerman & Sharwood Smith, 1986; McClure & Branstine, 1990; McLaughlin, 1987; Odlin, 1989). ...
... Some participants focused on form and asked for comments from the researcher at the end of the recording. This was expected since the sample consisted of very good students who have a solid grammar base (Dulay and Burt, 1978 The next section shows indicative examples of the most common mistakes recorded from their oral and written production, respectively. The sample shows that specific areas are equally "problematic". ...
... This study found that every type of error was discovered in student writing and the causes of these errors were first language interferences, translation process, and carelessness. Kumala, Aimah and Ifadah (2018) examined the grammatical errors of students' writing using the theory of Dulay, Burth and Krashen (1982). This study revealed that errors occur in all types, but the most dominant is the error or omission. ...
... Morphemes are one of the most fundamental linguistic units for English language students. As a result, researchers started to investigate whether there could be a pattern for English morpheme acquisition among English language students (Berko, 1958;Brown, 1973;Dulay & Burt, 1973, 1974a, 1974bLarsen-Freeman, 1975. One of the most wellproposed by Krashen et al. (1975Krashen et al. ( , 1976Krashen et al. ( , 1977Krashen et al. ( , 1978Krashen et al. ( , 1981. ...
... First of all, even though an abundance of studies investigates the feelings and attitudes of language learners during drama activities in the classroom, they mostly base their inferences and results on researcher observations. Some experimental studies reveal that drama decreases anxiety levels of students and makes them feel more confident and motivated (Stern, 1983;Sağlamel & Kayaoğlu, 2013;Schewe & Scott, 2003;Stern, 1983;Janudom & Wasanasomsithi, 2009). In the study conducted by Akey in 2006, it was found that when students feel confident and believe that they will succeed, and when teachers use activities based on peer-interactions in the lessons, student's successes increase. ...
... (p. 270) For example, with respect to Willig's second point above, Troike (1978) found that only seven of 150 possible studies were adequate to include in a review; Dulay and Burt (1980) surveyed 180 studies and found only 12 that met their criterion for inclusion; Baker and de Kanter (1981) reported that only 28 of 300 studies were acceptable for inclusion. Inclusion criteria varied widely so that what was considered inadequate in one review was acceptable in another (Willig, 1985). ...
... Scarcella and Crookall (1990) identified another critical aspect for successful language acquisition, which they refer to as the "positive effect."They reviewed the study literature on similar topics offered by numerous scholars, including Krashen (1982), Dulay and Burt (1978), and Schumann (1978). Role-playing may be divided into three categories: fully scripted, semi-scripted, and unscripted. ...
... Morphemes are one of the most fundamental linguistic units for English language students. As a result, researchers started to investigate whether there could be a pattern for English morpheme acquisition among English language students (Berko, 1958;Brown, 1973;Dulay & Burt, 1973, 1974a, 1974bLarsen-Freeman, 1975. One of the most wellproposed by Krashen et al. (1975Krashen et al. ( , 1976Krashen et al. ( , 1977Krashen et al. ( , 1978Krashen et al. ( , 1981. ...
... Many language teachers supported the notion and tried to suppress L1 use. However, based on the study on second language acquisition, scholars agree that L1 is not to be fully blamed over learning challenges, as well as the errors learners make while learning L2 (Dulay & Burt, 1973;Johnson & Newport, 1994). For instance, Dulay and Burt (1973) reported that Spanish interlocutors who were learning English made only a mere 3% of mistakes due to L1 interferences. ...