Mariame Diop's research while affiliated with Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles and other places

Publications (26)

Article
In January 2021, Senegal reported the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A(H5N1), which was detected on a poultry farm in Thies, Senegal, and in great white pelicans in the Djoudj National Bird Sanctuary. We report evidence of new transcontinental spread of H5N1 from Europe toward Africa.
Article
Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV-2) is associated with several disease syndromes in domestic pigs that have a significant impact on global pig production and health. Currently, little is known about the status of PCV-2 in Africa. In this study, a total of 408 archived DNA samples collected from pigs in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Ethiopia, the Dem...
Article
African swine fever (ASF) has been endemic in sub‐Saharan Africa since the 1960s. Following its introduction in Senegal, in 1957, ASF steadily progressed through West Africa, reaching Burkina Faso in 2003, and later Mali in 2016. Despite the heavy burden of disease on pig production, little information is available on the genetic diversity of Afric...
Article
Full-text available
Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), an arbovirus belonging to the Phlebovirus genus of the Phenuiviridae family, causes the zoonotic and mosquito-borne RVF. The virus, which primarily affects livestock (ruminants and camels) and humans, is at the origin of recent major outbreaks across the African continent (Mauritania, Libya, Sudan), and in the South-...
Article
Full-text available
Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) is a deadly viral disease that mainly affects small domestic ruminants. This disease threaten global food security and rural economy but its control is complicated notably because of extensive, poorly monitored animal movements in infected regions. Here we combined the largest PPR virus genetic and animal mobility n...
Article
Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants. The causal agent, PPR virus (PPRV), is classified into four genetically distinct lineages. Lineage IV, originally from Asia, has shown a unique capacity to spread across Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Recent studies have reported its presence in two West African...
Article
Since November 2018, several countries in West and Central Africa have reported mortalities in donkeys and horses. Specifically, more than 66,000 horses and donkeys have succumbed to disease in Burkina Faso, Chad, Cameroon, The Gambia, Ghana, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and Senegal. Strangles caused by Streptococcus equi subsp equi, African Horse Sickness...
Article
Full-text available
Background Host-vector contact is a key factor in vectorial capacity assessment and thus the transmission of mosquito-borne viruses such as Rift Valley Fever (RVF), an emerging zoonotic disease of interest in West Africa. The knowledge of the host-feeding patterns of vector species constitutes a key element in the assessment of their epidemiologica...
Article
Full-text available
Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) is a viral disease affecting predominantly small ruminants. Due to its transboundary nature, regional coordination of control strategies will be key to the success of the on-going PPR eradication campaign. Here, we aimed at exploring the extent of transboundary movement of PPR in West Africa using phylogenetic analy...
Preprint
Full-text available
Host-vector contact is a key factor in vectorial capacity assessment and thus the transmission of mosquito-borne viruses such as Rift Valley Fever (RVF), an emerging zoonotic disease of interest in West Africa. The knowledge of the host-feeding patterns of vector species constitutes a key element in the assessment of their epidemiological importanc...
Article
Full-text available
Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious and economically important disease affecting production of small ruminants (i.e., sheep and goats). Taking into consideration the lessons learnt from the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP), PPR is now targeted by the international veterinary community as the next animal disease to be erad...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years very virulent (VV) IBDV strains and classical (CV) IBDV strains re-emerged and caused devastating outbreaks in different parts of the world. In this study, genetic evolution of fifteen IBDVs collected in Senegal in was characterized to gain information for a better control of IBD. Following RT-PCR, nucleotide sequence of the VP2 hyp...
Conference Paper
Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious and devastating viral disease of small ruminants. It represents a serious risk for the economy and food security in regions of Africa, Middle East and Asia where the disease is endemic. Integrated knowledge of evolutionary and epidemiological factors underlying PPR virus (PPRV) emergence, pers...
Article
Full-text available
The identification of blood meal source of arthropod vector species contributes to the understanding of host-vector-pathogen interactions. The aim of the current work was to identify blood meal source in Culicoides biting midge species, biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses of livestock and equids, using a new ecological appro...
Article
Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious and often fatal disease affecting sheep and goats. Currently, it is endemic in Africa, the Middle and Near East, the Indian subcontinent and China. Understanding the molecular epidemiology and evolution of PPR virus (PPRV) can assist in the control of the transboundary spread of this economically imp...
Article
Full-text available
We report the complete genome sequence of a lineage I peste des petits ruminants virus (E32/1969) isolated in a Senegalese laboratory in 1969. This is the earliest peste des petits ruminants virus of any lineage sequenced to date and only the second lineage I virus available in public databases. FOOTNOTES Address correspondence to William G. Dundon...
Article
Full-text available
This blinded field safety study was conducted in Senegal to assess safety and immunogenicity of administration of the registered dose of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Clone 13 vaccine (Onderstepoort Biological Products) to sheep and goats of West African breeds under natural conditions. A total of 267 small ruminants (220 sheep, 47 goats) were inc...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Rift valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne disease of domestic and wild ruminants caused by RVF virus (RVFV), a phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae). RVF is widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa. In September of 2010, an RVF outbreak occurred in northern Mauritania involving mass abortions in small ruminants and camels (Camelus dromedarius) and at least...
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Article
Full-text available
The Schultzei group of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is distributed throughout Africa to northern Asia and Australasia and includes several potential vector species of livestock pathogens. The taxonomy of the species belonging to this species group is confounded by the wide geographical distribution and morphological variation exh...
Article
Les auteurs décrivent un foyer d’infection épizootique de péripneumonie contagieuse bovine (PPCB) causée par Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides biotype petites colonies (MmmSC) qui a affecté des bovins de race Ndama à Lounthy, un village situé dans le Parc national du Niokolo-Koba dans la Réserve nationale communautaire du Boundou, du département...
Article
Full-text available
The authors have described an epizootic infection of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides biotype Small Colony (MmmSC), that has affected Ndama bovine in Lounthy village, a locality based in Bala city in the Eastern part of Senegal, during the post-rainy season in November 2012. After the cessation...

Citations

... The formation of the viral precursor membrane can be hampered by reducing p54 protein synthesis [4]. Furthermore, the p54 protein is widely employed in the study of the characteristics of ASFV molecular evolution and can be used to detect ASFV [5][6][7][8]. ...
... Due to its threat to public health and the high risk of epidemics, the WHO identifies RVFV as a priority pathogen for its research and development blueprint [23]. Therefore, improving RVF diagnostic capacity in endemic countries and countries at risk of epidemic emergence is crucial to prevent further emergence and help in responding to outbreaks [22,24]. ...
... However, quantifying the direction and extent of pathogen transmission in multi-host systems is challenging, even in the case of extremely detailed longitudinal study systems with pathogen genomic and host life history data (Crispell et al., 2019). There is thus a need for other types of data, including interspecific contact rates and pathways, and enhanced epidemiological and serological data, to enable approaches that integrate these with genomics (Viana et al., 2016;Crispell et al., 2019;Bataille et al., 2021) and can lead to an improved understanding of interspecific PPRV transmission dynamics and the epidemiological roles of wildlife species. ...
... PPR is caused by the infectious viral agent PPRV, which is a non-segmented negativestrand RNA virus that has been phylogenetically classified, initially by partial sequence analyses and later through full genome analysis, into four distinct genetic lineages (I−IV) [3]. Lineage I contains viruses from West Africa, with very few defined isolates that were believed to have become extinct; however, recent studies have suggested that lineage I PPRV persists in West Africa, despite the emergence of apparently more dominant lineages [4]. Lineage II is also of West African origin, with historic isolates being described from Nigeria and Benin, with more contemporary detections also being from West Africa. ...
... H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) is the only subtype currently circulating amongst equine populations, as other avian-origin EIVs such as the H7N7 subtype became extinct. H3N8 EIV was first reported in USA in 1963 [15] during an outbreak of highly transmissible respiratory disease that led to a panzootic and the establishment of EIV as an endemic lineage in several countries [18][19][20][21]. Equine influenza is characterised by lesions predominantly in the upper and middle respiratory tract, such as rhinitis and tracheitis, where virus antigen is often detected [22]. ...
... Understanding of mosquito behaviour related to host feeding preference is important in understanding of vector-host-pathogen interacttions and can facilitate the design and consolidation of effective vector control interventions in an area [1][2][3][4]. Identification of the blood meal taken by the vector is the most objective method of identifying its natural blood sources [5,6]. Anophelines exhibit a wide range of host preferences such as humans, livestock, birds, and reptiles, and the prevalence of malaria is influenced by mosquito host selection. ...
... of good laboratory practices, may contribute to clarify these hypotheses. Indeed, the partial N gene sequence was commonly used as an effective target for PPR detection and lineage identification (Kwiatek et al. 2011, Tounkara et al. 2019, aiming mainly to understand the epidemiology and transmission dynamics of PPR (Tounkara et al. 2019), as in the present study. ...
... D'où l'intérêt de connaitre les caractéristiques des souches virales isolées à l'occasion de cas cliniques de la maladie. En effet, à ce jour, seules deux études se sont intéressées à la caractérisation moléculaire des souches virales circulant au Sénégal (Eterradossi et al., 1999 ;Badji et al., 2016 ). Ce qui fait que, des inconnues méritent d'être élucidées sur ce virus. ...
... One Culicoides specimen trapped at Urdaibai was found to have fed on cattle from a farm located 150 m from the trapping site and could only have reached the trap by crossing a dense forest patch. This relatively local dispersion after blood ingestion supports previous reports [11,65]. Although some studies have reported longer dispersal distances [42], such cases likely reflect wind-mediated passive dispersal [66]. ...