Margaret V. Richardson's research while affiliated with Harvard Medical School and other places

Citations

... The connective tissue of the cord, or Wharton's jelly, is derived from the extraembryonic mesoblast. McKay et al. (1955) referred to this jelly-like material as a "thixotropic gel" because it liquefies when touched (see also Bacsich & Riddell, 1945). The incorporation of this mesenchyme into the cord substance and the subamnionic layers probably accounts for their mucoid and compressible structures. ...
... Wynn [11] initially thought decidual cells contributed to giant cell formation though later [12] stated that Boyd and Hamilton [1] Pijnenborg [13] and others agreed they were trophoblastic in origin. Histochemical [14] and ultrastructural studies [15,16] demonstrated some similarity to syncytiotrophoblast. Loke et al. [17] showed placental bed giant cells expressed HLA-G, a marker of extravillous trophoblast, while Khong et al. [18] demonstrated the presence of cytokeratin but not vimentin, supporting their origin from trophoblast rather than decidual cells. ...
... Due to the distinctive gross appearance, hydatidiform moles (molar pregnancies) have been described since the fourth century BC [1]. The incidence of hydatidiform moles varies in different ethnic groups, with an estimated incidence of 2.43-13 per 1000 pregnancies in Asians and 0. 5-1.84 in Caucasians [2,3]. ...