Mansour Amroun's research while affiliated with Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi Ouzou and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Despite the known genetic permeability among wolf-like canids, there is currently no evidence of gene flow between the recently acknowledged African wolf (Canis lupaster) and domestic dogs (C. lupus familiaris). We genotyped African wolves across their range, together with African domestic dogs and ‘reference’ grey wolves (C. l. lupus; not occurrin...
Article
We studied the composition and seasonal changes in diet and prey selection in the wall lizard Podarcis vaucheri of the Djurdjura Mountains throughout its activity period, from April to October 2014. The analysis of 238 faecal pellets revealed 1 206 prey items distributed in 19 prey categories. The most important prey categories were: Formicidae, Co...
Article
The present study is the first qualitative and quantitative analysis of the diet of Algerian hedgehogs (Atelerix algirus) in Kabylia, Algeria. The study was carried out between May and October 2014 and covered two different sites, Yakouren (a forested site) and Tizi-Rached (an agricultural site). In Yakouren, the analysis of droppings allowed us to...
Article
Full-text available
The reproductive cycle of male wall lizard Podarcis vaucheri (Boulenger, 1905) living in Djurdjura mountain, was analyzed from April till October 2014. Its seasonal mixed-type cycle was characterized by three phases: sexual activity, quiescence and recrudescence. After the emergence of lizard from hibernation an intense sexual activity was observed...
Article
In this study, we present the first data on the diet of two sympatric lizard species Psammodromus algirus and Podarcis vaucheri of the Djurdjura Mountains. The analysis of 100 feces (43 Ps. algirus and 57 P. vaucheri) allowed us to identify 560 prey items (254 for Ps. algirus and 312 for P. vaucheri) distributed across 17 operational taxonomic unit...
Article
Full-text available
Since the rediscovery of the African Wolf, a certain level of uncertainty surrounds the ecological status of the golden Jackal in northern Africa. We characterized the trophic spectrum of the 'Golden Jackal' phenotype (distinct from the 'African Wolf phenotype) and its possible seasonal variations in relation with availability of resources (waste i...
Article
Since the rediscovery of the African Wolf, a certain level of uncertainty surrounds the ecological status of the golden Jackal in northern Africa. We characterized the trophic spectrum of the 'Golden Jackal' phenotype (distinct from the 'African Wolf' phenotype) and its possible seasonal variations in relation with availability of resources (waste...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of our study was to characterize the diet of the common genet Genetta genetta in the Djurdjura Mts., north of Algeria. Through a year-round survey, we collected 360 feces and identified 1970 items. Arthropods (33%) and mammals (25%) were dominant, followed by wild birds and plants. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus (65% within mammals)...

Citations

... Further investigations are needed across various environments, including southern and southeastern Europe where high numbers of free-ranging dogs share their environments with wolves (Galaverni et al., 2017;Salvatori et al., 2020) and where dog-jackal hybridisation has also been confirmed (Galov et al., 2015). Parallel concerns exist in other areas where wild canids hybridise with dogs, including Africa (Mallil et al., 2020), and Australia (Claridge et al., 2014). ...
... Nevertheless, there are data which show that (at least) some lacertid species have precisely defined patterns of food selection (e.g., Díaz, 1995;Carretero, 2004). In the last decades, numerous studies on food preferences and trophic ecology of lacertids were conducted (Arnold, 1987;Carret-ero and Llorente, 1993;Capula and Luiselli, 1994;Pérez-Mellado et al., 2011;Crovetto and Salvidio, 2013;Mamou et al., 2016Mamou et al., , 2019, although there are still many gaps in dietary research in some species and/or regions. ...
... Apenas hay datos íbero-baleares o canarios sobre la dieta en España. Información más detallada hay sobre la dieta de la especie en el norte de África, donde el consumo de hormigas (Hymenoptera) es mayoritario, aunque hay algunas variaciones estacionales (Doumandji y Doumandji 1992;Sayah, 1996;Ouarab y Doumandji, 2010;Djennoune et al. 2018;Mouhoub-Sayah et al., 2018). ...
... Les prospections ont eu lieu le jour, principalement par beau temps, favorable à l'activité de ces ectothermes [8]. Les observations reposent sur deux méthodes de prospection : La première méthode consiste en une visite des sites à priori favorables, grâce à une marche lente et silencieuse, ponctuée de fréquents arrêts [9]. Ainsi, les individus sont observés directement et/ou grâce aux indices de présence tels que : les terriers, les mues, les fèces etc. La seconde méthode consiste à rechercher les animaux cachés en fouillant les gîtes, en soulevant des pierres, troncs morts etc. ...
... Lacertid species are conservative and no strong variation in their period of hibernation has been detected (Carretero, 2006). In Algeria Podarcis vaucheri (a close relative of P. algirus), hibernates from November to February (Mamou et al., 2017) and hibernation season of P. algirus in temperate areas in Spain is from October to February (Civantos et al., 1999). Since the species have a wide distribution, temporal fluctuation and spatial distinctions can shift hibernation period. ...
... Indeed, feral dogs are supposedly common in Africa (Green and Gipson 1994). Together with the dogs accompanying the practices of modern pastoralism (Benoit 1984;Matallah et al. 2015), they may actively contribute to promote hybridization in different parts of the range of the African wolf, especially since the latter seems to frequently occur in degraded habitats (Amroun et al. 2014;Gutema et al. 2019) where domestic dogs typically roam. This could cause the genetic dilution of geographically confined and/or unique lineages of African wolves, such as in Ethiopia (and Kenya; see Gopalakrishnan et al. 2018;Koepfli et al. 2015), where we recovered 100% of hybrids. ...
... Nevertheless, there are data which show that (at least) some lacertid species have precisely defined patterns of food selection (e.g., Díaz, 1995;Carretero, 2004). In the last decades, numerous studies on food preferences and trophic ecology of lacertids were conducted (Arnold, 1987;Carret-ero and Llorente, 1993;Capula and Luiselli, 1994;Pérez-Mellado et al., 2011;Crovetto and Salvidio, 2013;Mamou et al., 2016Mamou et al., , 2019, although there are still many gaps in dietary research in some species and/or regions. ...
... This large distribution makes them useful for answering questions about how past climate periods could have affected mesic mammal communities in north Africa. Until recently, African golden wolves were considered the same species as the Eurasian golden jackal (Canis aureus), and most ecological data have been collected in Eurasia, making African golden wolves one of the least studied canid species in the world (Admasu et al., 2004;Amroun, Giraudoux, et al., 2006;Amroun, Oubellil, et al., 2014;McShane & Grettenberger, 1984). Their wide distribution and generalist predatory style has allowed them to adapt to a wide variety of habitats including arid or semi-arid landscapes, grasslands, savannahs, forests and high elevation areas in Morocco and Ethiopia as well as anthropized zones (Amroun et al., 2006;Amroun, Oubellil, et al., 2014;Cuzin, 2003;Kebede, 2017;McShane & Grettenberger, 1984). ...
... The observed response of the mongoose was expected for a species with a diet more focussed on consuming animals than alternative items, but with an opportunistic behaviour of consuming the most available resource in the moment (Palomares 1993). Conversely, even though genets focus primarily on predating the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) (Virgós et al. 1999;Amroun et al. 2014;Bandeira et al. 2018), their response towards the new food resource was similar to that of mongooses. This could indicate two things: that using our FPs containing easy-to-consume and abundant food outweighed the benefits of hunting their preferred preys or that the abundance of wood mouse in the study area during the trapping months had been lower than our resource, making our food source more likely to be consumed. ...