Maarten J. E. Broekman's research while affiliated with Radboud University and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity is severely threatened by habitat destruction. As a consquence of habitat destruction, the remaining habitat becomes more fragmented. This results in time-lagged population extirpations in remaining fragments when these are too small to support populations in the long term. If these time-lagged effects are ignored, the long-term impact...
Article
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Macroecological studies that require habitat suitability data for many species often derive this information from expert opinion. However, expert‐based information is inherently subjective and thus prone to errors. The increasing availability of GPS tracking data offers opportunities to evaluate and supplement expert‐based information with detailed...
Article
Full-text available
Many species show large variation in lifetime reproductive success (LRS), with a few individuals producing the majority of offspring. This variation can be explained by factors related to individuals (fixed heterogeneity) and stochastic differences in survival and reproduction (dynamic heterogeneity). In this study, we study the relative effects of...
Article
Full-text available
Many empirical studies motivated by an interest in stable coexistence have quantified negative density dependence, negative frequency dependence, or negative plant–soil feedback, but the links between these empirical results and ecological theory are not straightforward. Here, we relate these analyses to theoretical conditions for stabilisation and...

Citations

... Eupleridae is the most threatened carnivore family, with eight of its nine species listed as Endangered or Vulnerable, all of them are in decline, and with the worst RLI values. This group is endemic to Madagascar, a region recognised as a clear priority for biodiversity conservation, due to its large number of endemics and the wide range of threats facing its fauna and flora, such as habitat destruction and fragmentation and poaching (Vieilledent et al. 2018;Willcox 2020;Broekman et al. 2022). ...
... Previous studies have shown that intraspecific interactions can affect characteristics of plant canopy [14], roots morphology [15] and plant metabolic levels [16], all ultimately affecting plant growth and quality [17]. The effects of intraspecific interactions on plant performance can be easily realized by altering planting density [18,19]. Thus, obtaining high crop productivity depends on improved understanding of crop requirements. ...