M. Seman's research while affiliated with University of Melbourne and other places

Publications (22)

Article
Full-text available
Background Defibrillation guidelines recommend avoiding patient contact during shock delivery. However, hands-on defibrillation (compressions during shock) and manual pressure augmentation (MPA – pushing on the defibrillator pads during shock) may lead to improved clinical outcomes. There are limited data addressing the protection provided by perso...
Preprint
Background: The interaction between native left ventricular output and venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) flow may hinder perfusion of oxygenated blood to the aortic arch branches, resulting in differential hypoxia. Typically, the arterial cannula tip is placed in the iliac artery or abdominal aorta. However, the hemodynamic...
Article
A ‘cardio‐geriatric’ heart failure model of care was implemented to address the high rates of readmission in elderly acute decompensated heart failure patients. Despite demonstrably intensified management in both the cardiology and geriatric domains, this study did not demonstrate a positive effect on the primary outcome of all cause readmissions a...
Article
Aims: Health services worldwide face the challenge of providing care for increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) populations. The aims of this study were to determine whether CALD patients hospitalised with acute heart failure (HF) are at increased risk of rehospitalisation and emergency department (ED) visitation after discharge...
Conference Paper
Objective: To evaluate the effect of language barriers on time to thrombolysis and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Background: Acute stroke is a time-critical emergency where diagnosis and management are highly dependent upon accuracy of patient’s history. We hypothesised that limited English proficiency is associated with delayed onse...
Article
Doctor–patient language discordance has been shown to lead to worse clinical outcomes. In this study of patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST‐elevation myocardial infarction at an Australian health service, we demonstrated that limited English proficiency (LEP) is an independent predictor of prolonged symptom‐to‐door...
Article
Full-text available
Background Acute heart failure (AHF) is a frequent reason for hospitalization worldwide and effective treatment options are limited. It is known that AHF is a condition characterized by impaired vasorelaxation, together with reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, an endogenous vasodilatory compound. Supplementation of inorganic sodium nitrate (...

Citations

... Such specialists bring added value to usual care by combining geriatric and cardiologic expertise, both of which are essential for this specific population. 24 Interestingly, we identified a J-curve phenomenon characterizing the relationship between extreme SBP and increased mortality, which has already been shown in HFpEF. 25 An SBP target of 130-139 mmHg, as recommended by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), 26 appeared to be associated with a better prognosis. ...
... This was a single-centre study that makes the generalisability of the findings uncertain. However, our centre represents an area with a high proportion of migrants in Melbourne, which provides an excellent opportunity for studies into language barriers [9]; i.e., 20% of the study population had a primary language other than English compared to >7% reported nationally [4]. While we conducted an adjusted analysis to a range of potential confounding variables, other potential confounders such as ethnicity and socioeconomic status were not collected. ...
... Other studies, however, had wholly inaccurate definitions of language concordance, such as Mehler et al. (31), who used patients' ethnicity and immigrant status as a proxy for limited English proficiency (LEP). Similarly, Biswas et al. (21) defined LEP patients as any participant who did not self-report English as their primary language, negating the existence of multilingual participants. The majority of studies used self-reported surveys and questionnaires to collect data on preferred language and language fluency among patients and physicians, while other studies used electronic medical databases to access patients' primary language(s). ...
... This disease has tremendous undesirable consequences which can lower the quality of life and even lead to death [25]. Numerous human intervention studies have investigated the effects of dietary nitrate on vascular health [3,13,26,27]. These studies have shown that increased nitrate intake can improve vasorelaxation [27], lower blood pressure [2] and improve function of endothelium [4], which eventually resulted in lower death risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) [10]. ...