M. Gordon's research while affiliated with French National Centre for Scientific Research and other places

Publications (30)

Article
Crystalline Si nanowires have been grown using a microelectronics-friendly solid-phase catalyst (PtSi) by chemical vapor deposition. Tapered growth occurs at high deposition temperatures (>700 °C) due to uncatalyzed Si deposition at wire sidewalls, but this effect can be reduced at lower T (<600 °C), while still maintaining reasonable growth rates...
Article
Precise localization of nanoparticles is often required to fully exploit the intrinsic physical properties as well as to develop methodologies for large-scale integration of nanodevice building-blocks with the macroscopic world. In this work, a simple technique, based on control of capillary forces at the triple contact line during evaporation, was...
Article
Resist pull-off during mold-substrate separation is one of the major limiting factor for high resolution replication using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Adhesion properties of anti-sticking layers (ASLs) are generally obtained using contact angle measurements; however, this technique does not take into account mold penetration into the polymer and...
Article
We present the development of a reliable 4 in. lift-off process based on trilayer nanoimprint lithography (NIL). At first, an inductively coupled plasma etching step of the imprinted resist is used to remove the residual resist thickness after NIL for different pattern geometry and density, while maintaining the critical dimensions of the studied p...
Article
We present the replication of sub-40nm nanoelectrodes over an 8-in. silicon wafer using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Three different NIL polymers (NEB22A2, PMMA and Polycarbonate) are investigated as potential replication candidates. For each polymer resist, we study the single step imprint of both micrometric contact pads and nanoelectrodes. Flo...

Citations

... Metal nanoelectrodes with less than 100 nm in lateral side and a few microns of longitudinal size have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years because of the advantages they present, such as higher current density and higher signal-to-noise ratio compared to conventional microelectrodes [1]. Electrodes with nanometrical width and inter-electrode spacing have been fabricated by nanoimprint lithography (NIL)234 or focused-ion-beam lithography (FIB) [5] and have been used in a large variety of applications, e.g. for contacting single molecules678, for impedimetrical biosensing91011 or for conducting nanoelectrochemical tests [12, 13]. Regarding biodetection purposes, interdigitated nanoelectrode devices (INDs) combine the aforementioned confinement effects with large areas, enabling one to combine sensitivity and fast response time. ...
... The halo effect in Fig. 2f indicates that the charges were injected in the axon definitely, and didn't spread into the underlying silicon wafer. This charge stability may attribute to the SiO 2 barrier underneath the axons [34]. The charges transported along the whole axon, and distributed almost homogeneously in the axon, which demonstrates that the charges are mobile and delocalized in the full-scale axon. ...
... Other metal catalysts that can address existing problems with the Au catalyst have been sought. Some of the alternatives to the Au catalyst include Fe, 8 In, 9 Ga, 10 Al, 11 Mn, 12 Pt, 13 Co, 14 Sn, 15 and Ti. 16 Use of titanium (Ti) is an interesting option by comparison, as it has high melting and eutectic temperatures in silicon; 17 it also solves some of the nanowire integration problems typically seen when catalysts with low eutectic temperatures are used. ...
... Based on this analysis it can be concluded that at low liquid elevation, the submerged particles experience strong lateral and vertical capillary forces due to a large 'capillary charge' that causes strong interaction. Similar conclusion was reported by Peyrade et al. [19]. Using the current expressions for calculating the VCF and LCF via the macroscopic parameters, the conversion time with the necessary numerical calculations can delay the simulation significantly . ...
... The structure of a trilayer stack consists of a bottom polymer, a middle layer and a top polymer layer. The bottom polymer is usually PMMA followed by the middle layer made of titanium or germanium [25]. The top layer is photosensitive resist, acrylate oligomers or polyester amide depending on the manufacturing technology [22,26]. ...
... In this work, microelectronic fabrication technology is applied for the development of the nanoelectrode based biosensor. Processes such as photolithography and thermal processes like oxidation and deposition are used to make dedicated design on top of silicon wafer surface [5][6][7]. This paper is mainly focused on the thermal processes and thickness inspection on certain layers. ...
... Besides that, all of the above efforts focused on the effect of residual stress, film stiffness, and boundary conditions on the mechanical behavior of nanowires. Nevertheless, the latest experimental measurements show that the mechanical properties of nanowires often exhibit a dependence on sectional geometry [79][80][81]. Zheng et al. [76] investigated the size-dependent elastic property of nanowires induced by the surface effect using the classical core-shell model. The effective Young's modulus of nanowires with regular polygonal cross sections was unified into a simple and explicit relation. ...
... Tackling these problems is accelerated by application of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) [7]. AFM enables relatively fast testing of interfacial properties between pairs of materials. ...