M. Duncan Stanton's research while affiliated with Spalding University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
Full-text available
The model described in this paper takes into consideration two key findings: (a) In a given year, the vast majority (90–95%) of active substance abusers do not enter treatment or self-help groups, and (b) substance abusers have frequent contact with their families (60–80% either live with a parent or are in daily contact). This paper presents a met...
Article
Full-text available
Our goal was to explore, through a Stage I NIH clinical study, the effectiveness of a manual-driven, timely response method for helping the "concerned other" get resistant substance abusers into treatment/self-help with minimum professional time/effort. A manual-driven protocol, "A Relational Sequence for Engagement (ARISE)," was applied with 110 c...
Article
This review examines the results from 19 outcome studies, involving 1,501 cases, within 10 different clinical approaches to getting alcohol or drug abusers to engage in treatment or self-help. Each approach is summarized and its "success rate(s)" presented. Comparisons are made across various subcategories, such as alcohol vs. drug abusers, adolesc...
Article
To more fully understand the associations between family variables and sexual behavior of young women. Forty-two female clients of an urban youth agency (16 to 25 years of age) were interviewed about intergenerational stories and contact with extended families. Individuation was measured by self-report using the intergenerational individuation subs...
Article
The model described in this paper takes into consideration two key findings: (a) In a given year, the vast majority (90-95%) of active substance abusers do not enter treatment or self-help groups, and (b) substance abusers have frequent contact with their families (60-80% either live with a parent or are in daily contact). This paper presents a met...
Article
Full-text available
Untreated chemical dependency costs the United States over $165 billion annually. Meanwhile, treatment offsets these costs by a ratio of $7 saved for every $1 spent. But the vast majority of chemically dependent people (CDPs) remain uninvolved in either treatment or self-help groups. It is therefore imperative that more effective ways be developed...
Article
Full-text available
An alternative method to the Johnson Institute’s “Intervention” is presented which, while incorporating many of Johnson’s innovations, is, additionally: (a) less confrontative, thereby avoiding the reactivity in clients and family members that such confrontational approaches have tended to evoke; (b) takes into account both the needs of the chemica...
Article
Full-text available
An alternative method to the Johnson Institute's "Intervention" is presented which, while incorporating many of Johnson's innovations, is, additionally: (a) less confrontative, thereby avoiding the reactivity in clients and family members that such confrontational approaches have tended to evoke; (b) takes into account both the needs of the chemica...
Article
This review synthesizes drug abuse outcome studies that included a family-couples therapy treatment condition. The meta-analytic evidence, across 1,571 cases involving an estimated 3,500 patients and family members, favors family therapy over (a) individual counseling or therapy, (b) peer group therapy, and (c) family psychoeducation. Family therap...
Article
A method, the Albany-Rochester Interventional Sequence for Engagement (ARISE), is described for engaging highly ambivalent alcohol- and/or drug-dependent individuals in treatment. A three stage interventional sequence is presented, which begins when a family member or concerned other contacts a treatment program regarding a substance abuser who nee...

Citations

... Ce terme général, désigne une forme de thérapie familiale atypique qui inclut un ou plusieurs membres de la famille, avec lesquels le thérapeute travaille en séance, sans le consommateur. Les thérapies familiales unilatérales réunissent plusieurs méthodes spécifiques qui toutes s'appuient sur l'idée que les proches doivent agir activement pour favoriser l'entrée en traitement de la personne toxicomane (Barber & Crisp, 1995 ;Garrett et al., 1998 ;Smith & Meyers, 2011). S'ils ne sont jamais considérés « coupables » des troubles addictifs ou responsables des changements positifs, on estime qu'ils peuvent jouer un rôle clé dans la réduction des conduites de consommation par leurs réactions face à celles-ci et par leur manière de les communiquer. ...
... Among positive factors associated with favorable treatment outcomes is social support (see a meta-analysis review, Hogan, Linden, & Najarian, 2002). Interventions using social network strategies help increase treatment attendance and enhance treatment retention for people with substance use problems (Landau et al., 2000;Soyez, De Leon, Broekaert, & Rosseel, 2006). Social networks comprised of people encouraging recovery-related behaviors and showing favorable attitudes toward recovery predict a greater intention to change drug use behaviors (Matto, Miller, & Spera, 2007). ...
... Adherencia al tratamiento como clave para el éxito Kazdin (1990) detectó que los adolescentes con problemas de conducta tienen importantes tasas de abandono, llegando incluso al 50% o 70%. Si bien los modelos familiares muestran amplios efectos positivos en los problemas conductuales, conducta infractora y abuso de drogas (Henggeler & Sheidow, 2012); uno de los principales desafíos para el éxito de las intervenciones es lograr involucrar a los adolescentes, cuidadores y/u otros miembros de la familia en el tratamiento (Stanton & Shadish, 1997). Trotter (2015), quien se ha dedicado al estudio de la intervención con clientes «involuntarios», explica que la intervención familiar puede llegar a ser una muy buena manera de trabajar con los clientes involuntarios. ...
... Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 15(4), 333-343. Garrett, J., Landau-Stanton, J., Stanton, M.D.,Stellato-Kabat, J., & Stellato-Kabat, D. (1997).ARISE: A method for engaging reluctant alcohol-and drug-dependent individuals in treatment. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 14(3), 235-248. ...
... There is consistent evidence that family involvement helps engage treatmentresistant individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) into therapy (Manuel et al., 2012;Miller, Meyers, & Tonigan, 1999), enhances the probability that adults in detoxification units later enter formal treatment (Ino & Hayasida, 2000;O'Farrell, Murphy, Alter, & Fals-Stewart, 2008), and improves outcomes across a range of populations (McCrady, Epstein, Cook, Jensen, & Hildebrandt, 2009;McCrady et al., 1986;O'Farrell, Choquette, & Cutter, 1998;O'Farrell, Schumm, Dunlap, Murphy, & Muchowski, 2016;Powers, Vedel, & Emmelkamp, 2008;Schumm, O'Farrell, Kahler, Murphy, & Muchowski, 2014). Approaches with promising efficacy data include family-based contingency management to enhance adherence to aftercare (Ossip-Klein & Rychtarik, 1993) or medication (Azrin, Sisson, Meyers, & Godley, 1982), behavioral couple therapy (BCT) for SUDs (e.g., Powers et al., 2008), Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT; Miller et al., 1999), a Relational Intervention Sequence for Engagement (ARISE; Garrett et al., 1998), brief family therapy to facilitate treatment engagement after detoxification (O'Farrell et al., 2008), and the brief discharge intervention method (Ino & Hayasida, 2000). ...
... Several patients and practitioners reported that patients passed pamphlets and information from the study to tobacco-using friends, family, and coworkers. In addition to tobacco users, we recruited "concerned others" (Garrett et al., 1999) to participate in qualitative interviews (i.e., patients who reported interest in addressing their own secondhand smoke exposure and/or patients concerned for the health of tobacco-using friends or family members). This recruitment strategy was intended to assess whether PEMs distributed as part of the BI training could affect a broader community of tobacco users. ...
... The sequential aims of this treatment are to build a network, coaching the concerned family member to arrange a meeting with significant others, inviting the substance abuser, and subsequently conducting an "Intervention." [48] The efficacy ARISE has been demonstrated, with more numbers of significant others involved better associated with outcomes. [49] The CRAFT and ARISE approaches described above have some differences. ...
... In addition, living in the same place for a long time was associated with a lower risk of suicide attempts. Tuttle, Landau, Stanton, King, and Frodi (2004) conducted a qualitative study and introduced the concept of ''family resilience.'' They found that young women who are in close contact with their families are less likely to exhibit risky sexual behavior. ...
... Despite the high prevalence of drinking problems, most alcohol-dependent people do not seek professional help or participate in self-help groups, highlighting the need to develop alternative strategies to improve treatment rates [5]. Social networks may be useful in this process, as social pressure has been shown to be an important factor leading alcohol-dependent people to seek treatment [6][7][8], with studies suggesting that family members and friends have greater impact than trained professionals in increasing help seeking [9,10]. ...
... However, if the abuser refuses involvement, a Johnson-like intervention is conducted. In a study of 110 nonsubstance abusing concerned others serving as subjects, 91 (83%) successfully engaged the substance abuser into treatment or self-help group (Landau et al., 2004). ...