M. C. Simpson's research while affiliated with University of the West Indies at Cave Hill, Barbados and other places

Publications (7)

Technical Report
Full-text available
Climate change is a serious and substantial threat to the economies of Caribbean nations, the livelihoods of communities and the environments and infrastructure across the region. The CARIBSAVE Climate Change Risk Atlas (CCCRA) Phase I, funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID/UKaid) and the Australian Agency for Internationa...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Climate change is a serious and substantial threat to the economies of Caribbean nations, the livelihoods of communities and the environments and infrastructure across the region. The CARIBSAVE Climate Change Risk Atlas (CCCRA) Phase I, funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID/UKaid) and the Australian Agency for Internationa...

Citations

... 46 Este riesgo se ve agravado por el carácter de baja altitud de la isla y dado que la mayoría de los pueblos y aldeas se concentran cerca de la costa. Además, es probable que todas las islas de Las Bahamas sufran pérdidas económicas significativas por el aumento del nivel del mar, las inundaciones y erosión costeras, el retroceso de los manglares, la disminución de la productividad del lecho de pastos marinos y la intrusión salina (Simpson et al., 2012). ...
... Boundedness, isolation from markets, limited land area, and higher costs of infrastructure are crucial factors that restrict sustainable development in many SIDS (Deschenes and Chertow, 2004;Eckelman and Chertow, 2009;Briguglio, 1995;Chertow, 2013, 2014;UNEP, 2008;IPCC, 2014). The lack of effective waste management systems on most SIDS, and by extension, the availability of reliable data, restricts meaningful planning and sustainable action (Simpson, 2012;Eckelman et al., 2014). In addition, SIDS are confronted with limitations in recycling and resale opportunities, lack of policies, and barriers to exporting waste to other countries (Camilleri-Fenech et al., 2018;Fuldauer et al., 2019), thereby requiring innovative solutions (UNEP, 2019). ...
... The Nicaraguan government is particularly focused on addressing climate change, especially for rural populations. Various studies highlight how Nicaragua is especially prone to damage from hurricanes and tropical storms (e.g., [78]), and is "susceptible to other natural disasters including floods, droughts and landslides, events whose frequency, severity and impacts will be amplified by increased climate variability," [97]. Equally, though, a number of scholars critically discuss the gendered dimensions of climate change in Nicaragua; in particular, by exploring how international development entities working on gender equality and gender-sensitive climate adaptation policies understand the impacts that climate change may have on gender relations, gender roles, identities and divisions of labour [1,3,78]. ...
... SIDS are highly exposed to the impact of climate change. A significant amount of their population and infrastructural assets are located in areas exposed to climate hazards [2]. In the Caribbean, approximately seventy per cent of the population live in cooperation will drastically cut down work duplicity and fragmentation between policies and departments and effectively use limited resources to accomplish collective goals [21]. ...
... Projected changes in temperature and rainfall under RCP8.5 scenario would likely increase diseases and the occurrence of extreme water stress (Cashman et al., 2010;Nelson et al., 2009;Pulwarty et al., 2010;Simpson et al., 2010). However, under SAG, we would notice less extreme temperature and precipitation than in a world without SAG as also showed by Pinto et al. (2020). ...
... In response to these possible impacts of climate change on tourism, tourism managers, destination managers, policy makers and governments have been urged to adapt to the changing climate (Simpson et al., 2008). However, tourism policy in the Maltese islands has overlooked the issue of climate change for several years (Dodds & Kelman, 2008). ...
... And while scientists are still uncertain as to whether the region will experience an increase in the frequency of hurricanes and tropical storms, there seems to be some agreement that the intensity of these events will likely increase under a warmer climate. In general, regional model predictions indicate a deepening of this new and emerging climate characterised by a much warmer and drier future regional climate Campbell et al. 2011;Gamble 2009), additional increases in regional sea levels (Perrette et al. 2013;Simpson et al. 2009) and an increase in the frequency of high magnitude Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms (Bender et al. 2010). ...