Lynette Russell's research while affiliated with Deakin University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Eliza Fraser - an historical record K'gari, Mrs Fraser and Butchulia oral tradition shipwreck saga as archaeological text - (re)constructing Fraser Island's aboriginal past "mere trifles and faint representations" - the representation of savage life offered by Eliza Fraser "our fair narrator" down-under - Mrs Fraser's body and the preservation of t...
Article
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Colonizers often subjugate the colonized Other as an inferior form of humanity. In the Euro-Australian settler-colonial context such ethnocentric views legitimated the acquisition of indigenous lands. An important element of this process of dispossession was the appropriation of indigenous heritage and the (re)presentation of indigenous archaeologi...
Article
Full-text available
Amongst the most striking and the most handsome of ancient Australian relics are the Bradshaw paintings of the Kimberley, in the remote northwest of the continent, uncertainly dated but seemingly most ancient. According to one published view, the Bradshaws are not so much ‘early Aboriginal’ as ‘pre-Aboriginal’. Issue is taken with that notion, in l...

Citations

... At the same time, a range of high-profile university-based research projects have considerably advanced knowledge about the rock art in the Kimberley Travers and Ross 2016;Veth et al. 2018;Harper et al. 2019;Finch et al. 2020;Moore et al. 2020). These projects have been invaluable in correcting some of the persisting myths about the art (related, for example, to pre-Aboriginal authorship; see e.g., McNiven and Russell 1997;Redmond 2002;Porr and Bell 2012) and have enormously increased the understanding of the temporal complexity and depth of the rock art in the Kimberley. ...
... However, even if the pipes were of seventeenth century Dutch origin, such data would not constitute evidence of a Dutch presence on Fraser Island as such pipes were common trade items and could have arrived there by a number of routes which need not involve Dutch vessels or personnel. Dutch pipes in the 1838; Alexander 1971;McNiven et al. 1998). Again, exchange of items took place soon after arrival on the Island's east coast to the point that Second Mate John Baxter described it as a 'regular system of barter' (Curtis 1838:43-4). ...
... Their mode of commemorating the war and interpreting its events, as well as how they are using the landscape for memorialization, are a window onto the colonial past. As such, this work seeks to contribute to the growing body of knowledge about the rituals and politics of memory-making, memorialization, and commemoration (Ashplant et al. 2013;Confino 1997;Huyssen 2003;Gillis 1994;Marschall 2010;Mayo 1988;Olick 2013;Olick and Robbins 1998;Russell and McNiven 1998;Steiner and Zelizer 1995;van Alphen and Carretero 2015). ...