Lynda‐ann Blanchard's research while affiliated with The University of Sydney and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Linking peace to tourism has led to key questions in the academic literature. Is tourism a generator of peace or simply its beneficiary? Can tourism be a social force or is it merely an industry? What kind of pedagogical principles can tourism utilise to promote learning for peace? This article offers a case study of Peace Boat, a Japan-based non-g...
Article
United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 16 focuses on fostering inclusive, just and peaceful societies to ensure sustainable development. This can be an important catalyst to sustainable tourism and draws needed attention to the value of peace through tourism thinking. We might ask by what means could we address structural injustices in tourism...
Article
This paper tells stories from a higher education study abroad collaboration entitled Investigating Diversity, Human Rights and Civil Society in Japan and Australia. Starting from a pedagogical focus on students’ active learning about human rights, this project has come to value relationship building—between academic institutions, civil society and...

Citations

... The prologue sets the context for this research that explores the space of animal justice in wildlife sanctuaries from a posthuman perspective. The use of the prologue vignette relies on our methodology being inspired by auto-ethnography, creativity and dialogue, and it allows an emphasis on some key aspects concerning human-wildlife relations (Blanchard et al., 2022;Jenkins et al., 2020). Our position is that such relations need to be rethought in the light of the growing debate on the Anthropocene epoch and its impact in terms of global issues like climate change, loss of biodiversity, and widespread injustice perpetrated by humans towards other animal species (Bertella, 2019). ...
... It is recognised that tourism has the potential to contribute to more sociologically and ecologically just forms of development (Higgins--Desbiolles, 2018a), through promoting peace (Farmaki, 2017;Higgins-Desbiolles, Blanchard, & Urbain, 2021), fairly distributing the benefits between communities and individuals (Jamal, 2019;Rastegar, Zarezadeh, & Gretzel, 2021), increasing self-esteem and capabilities of indigenous groups (Camargo & Vázquez-Maguirre, 2021;Harbor & Hunt, 2021), involving community and empowering women (Mkono, Rastegar, & Ruhanen, 2021;Tajeddini, Walle, & Denisa, 2017), conserving the natural environment and nonhuman animals (Belicia & Islam, 2018), and securing justice to build a positive future (Higgins--Desbiolles, 2008). However, so far, such ambitious aims have not translated into tourism practice. ...
... HRE has been criticized for being a way to point the finger towards others for violating human rights without critical self-reflecting on their own context. 54 A recent doctoral thesis 55 argues that HRE is built around dichotomizations, and Norway is often presented in contrast 'to foreign countries' where human rights violations occur. Rights violations are thus seen as a problem outside rather than within Norway's borders; this may make students' own context feel less relevant even though, as noted earlier, nursing students and health professionals meet ethical challenges and rights violations on a daily basis. ...