Lyn Adamson's research while affiliated with The University of Newcastle, Australia and other places

Publications (11)

Article
Creating databases that will support longitudinal cohort studies over extended periods of time is a challenge. The need to record and archive all current and historical activities for each participant can result in large databases. Effectively managing these databases is a key component of achieving successful outcomes for longitudinal studies. Thi...
Article
Longitudinal studies often include substudies which involve collection of specific and more detailed data from subsets of study participants. The longitudinal study framework adds methodological strength to these substudies through enabling sampling of individuals with exposures or outcomes of interest, and through retrospective and prospective acc...
Article
The strength and success of any research project lies in the participant’s belief that their time and contribution is valued and worthwhile. Developing and maintaining relationships with participants in longitudinal research projects are crucial elements to ensuring the project will meet its aims and objectives. Investing time and resources in the...
Article
There are many methods for establishing and recruiting participants for longitudinal studies. Mostly, the participants will be sampled from a population, and the study will need some list or methods for identifying and selecting the people to be invited to take part in the study. The choice of methods for selecting and recruiting participants will...
Article
Objective: To assess the effectiveness of the National Death Index (NDI) in identifying participants in the oldest cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) who had died between 1996 and 1998. Methods: Identifying information for each woman was matched with the NDI using a probabilistic algorithm and clerical review....

Citations

... The final survey was approved by the ALSWH Publications , Substudies and Analyses Committee and comprised 81 fixed-choice and four opened-ended questions about pregnancy and postnatal care, emotional health and wellbeing, labour and delivery, breastfeeding, health service use and socio-demographic factors. Protocols and policies for conducting sub-studies through ALSWH are well documented elsewhere (e.g., [24,25]. ...
... ALSWH participants are followed up at each subsequent wave unless they request to withdraw from the study or die. Extensive efforts are made to trace and procure the cooperation of participants (Adamson & Graves, 2007;Powers et al., 2015;Women's Health Australia, 2017). Where current contact details are missing, electoral rolls and secondary contacts are consulted. ...
... Postal surveys have been routinely used as a primary method of recruitment for large-scale national cohort studies and are a particularly efficient method for dispersed populations [3]. Yet, postal response rates are unknown for most Indigenous populations, because cohort studies in these populations have tended to opt for other recruitment approaches [4][5][6]. ...
... There can also be difficulties in maintaining contact with participants, especially in contexts of displacement or mobility. Developing relationships that can withstand this requires time and investment by researchers, which must be supported by funding (Adamson and Chojenta 2007). Because of these complexities and expenses, cohort studies such as GAGE are rare. ...
... Ethics approval was granted by the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland. The ALSWH has also gained approval to access national and state-based datasets such as the Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS), Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), National Death Index (NDI), Aged Care Datasets, Cancer Registry, and Admitted Patients Data Collections (APDC) [22]. These linked data provide detailed and comprehensive information regarding women's medication and overall healthcare services use. ...
... Women with PCOS report similar barriers to lifestyle and weight management as those generally faced by women of reproductive age without PCOS, including conflict with work and family commitments, or disliking the "mundaneness" of a restricted diet [14,106]. These barriers may contribute to the high risk of weight gain in women of reproductive age [107]. However, these general barriers are further complicated with features of PCOS, particularly the psychological manifestations of body dissatisfaction and depressive symptoms. ...
... The sample for this sub study consists of community-based women from the 1946-1951, mid aged cohort. Arthritis was found to be common in this group, with 32% of women reporting arthritis in 2006 when they were aged between 55-66 years [31]. In 2010, when the mid-aged cohort was aged between 59-64 years 17.9% of women reported osteoarthritis, 4.7% reported rheumatoid arthritis and 13.3% reported 'other' arthritis [32]. ...
... According to a government report published in 2019, about 41% of women and 11% of men aged 15 years and above were obese [12]. Because women of childbearing age between 15 to 49 years old (WCBA) accumulate weight faster than other women [13][14][15][16], the adverse consequences of obesity among this group could be pronounced. Obesity during a woman's childbearing years is associated with an increased risk of infertility, miscarriage, stillbirths and births with congenital disabilities, shoulder dystocia and other adverse obstetric outcomes [17][18][19][20][21][22]. ...
... In line with other research among WLHIV in South Africa, we observed high levels of residential instability and mobility [11,14,15]. Maintaining frequent communication has been noted as a critical retention strategy [16]; here, population mobility affected the ease of locating participants after 18 months without updated contact details. Researchers should carefully consider the frequency of eliciting changes in contact information and what information to collect, including addresses of relatives and rural homes In addition, researchers should assess participant preferences related to the use of contact details and implement strategies to ensure confidentiality is maintained during any communication process. ...
... 4 Incentives (monetary or non-monetary) feature in the strategies proposed for both the recruitment and the retention of participants. 7,13,17,[22][23][24] Monetary incentives may prove effective but might not motivate all participants equally. 4 According to Adamson et al., the initial message to potential participants has to be is understandable, credible, and simple with short sentences applied to provide the necessary explanations. ...