Lydia Scott's research while affiliated with Morton Arboretum and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Urban forests are important components of societal interactions with nature. We focused on urban forest patches, a distinct and underexplored subset of the urban forest that spans land uses and ownerships, and requires silvicultural practices to address their unique biophysical characteristics and management regimes. Our goal was to elucidate multi...
Article
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We introduce a conceptual model of the urban forest patch as a complex social-ecological system, incorporating cross-scale interactions. We developed this model through an interdisciplinary process engaging social and ecological scientists and urban land management decision makers, with a focus on temperate forest social-ecological systems. In this...
Article
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This issue brief summarizes the benefits that trees provide to both the "built environment" and municipal planning goals. Drawing on a survey administered to public officials, it reviews strategies that municipalities use to maximize the benefits of trees, while providing evidence that trees provide both aesthetic and key functional purposes. The f...
Technical Report
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The urban forest of the Chicago Wilderness region, a 7-million-acre area covering portions of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin, will face direct and indirect impacts from a changing climate over the 21st century. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of urban trees and natural and developed landscapes within the Chicago Wilderness r...
Article
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Planting urban trees and expanding urban forest canopy cover are often considered key strategies for reducing climate change impacts in urban areas. However, urban trees and forests can also be vulnerable to climate change through shifts in tree habitat suitability, changes in pests and diseases, and changes in extreme weather events. We developed...

Citations

... Additionally, menus can be viewed as dynamic, long-term resources that can be revisited and improved over time. Menus have been created through multiple initiatives and various approaches to serve specific disciplinary, regional, and community-based interests [55][56][57][58][59][60]. ...
... Second, Heneghan et al. (2019) observed similar outcomes despite differences in organizational structures and approaches to oak woodland governance in Chicago. Most recently, Johnson et al. (2021) presented a conceptual model for urban forest patches within a broader regional context, and identified how multi-scalar socio-ecological drivers interact spatially and temporally with forest patch conditions. Despite collective limited understanding of the governance and management practices that support them, urban forest patches serve an important contribution to ecosystem services (Livesley et al., 2016;Vieira et al., 2018) and critical infrastructure as part of the broader urban forest (e.g., Minor et al., 2015). ...
... Such mistakes include being misleading on the topping dimension, pruning types, and pruning cut, actions which have been implemented by most tree pruning workers who participated in this study; this has been verified by scholars (Badrulhisham & Othman, 2016;Fickri & Siregar, 2018;Sreetheran et al., 2011). Other mistakes stated by some scholars, including virus infestations which spread from pruning tools, an inappropriate size of branches pruned (Kennelly et al., 2016) and an incorrect pruning schedule (Darling et al., 2017;Koeser et al., 2016), fail to capture the attention of tree pruning workers. Thus, ignorance of tree pruning best practice is associated with insufficient pruning knowledge among tree pruning workers specified in this study. ...
... High impervious ground surface and a higher water loss due to increased evapotranspiration [15,16] may lead to increased water stress in urban areas compared to natural environments. Further, recent studies have shown that drought is the main inciting factor impacting urban trees' health and survival [17,18], and climatic predictions forecast rising temperatures and more frequent heat and drought events. Therefore, there is a need for urban tree management to select tree species according to their future drought response [19]. ...
... Rather, we advocate that urban forest management decisions can integrate better information about the future climate of cities and urban tree species that will not grow as expected given these new conditions. This information can help make better decisions about urban tree species selection, including introducing new species and genotypes, accounting for the potential risk associated with such introductions (e.g., invasiveness, light regimes, pest and pathogens, biodiversity connections, social preferences; Almas & Conway, 2016;Brandt et al., 2016;Ordóñez & Duinker, 2015;Steenberg et al., 2019), protecting or safeguarding existing vulnerable tree species, and working alongside the nursery sector to evaluate which tree species to grow and Fig. 2. Probability density of the 95th percentile of mean annual temperature (MAT) of future safety margins of each species across 10 Canadian cities. Black dotted lines indicate the median across species. ...