Luis J. Villanueva-Rivera's research while affiliated with Purdue University and other places

Publications (27)

Article
Full-text available
We used data from automated recording systems to describe the courtship call of the Puer-torican Plains Coquí frog (Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi) and examined its calling phenol-ogy to make inferences about the species' system of acoustic communication. We also contrasted the phenology of courtship calling with published data on the species' adve...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individuals in acoustic communities compete for the use of the sound resource for communication, a problem that can be studied as niche competition. The acoustic niche hypothesis presents a way to study the partitioning of the resource, but the studies have to take into account the three dimensions of this niche: time, acoustic frequency, and space...
Preprint
Individuals in acoustic communities compete for the use of the sound resource for communication, a problem that can be studied as niche competition. The acoustic niche hypothesis presents a way to study the partitioning of the resource, but the studies have to take into account the three dimensions of this niche: time, acoustic frequency, and space...
Article
Soundscape ecology is an emergent area of acoustics that attempts to synthesize the concepts of landscape ecology, bioacoustics, noise, music, ethics, and biogeography. By focusing on the interplay of three main sources of sound: biological, geophysical, and anthropogenic, we hope to understand how humans impact ecosystems at a variety of spatial a...
Article
Full-text available
We documented patterns of microhabitat use, relative species abundance, and acoustic characteristics of a Puerto Rican native anuran assemblage from a palustrine herbaceous wetland. We found significant interspecific differences in the spatial distribution of calling males among microhabitat types, which differed in percent cover, height, and physi...
Article
Long-term monitoring of frog populations is needed to understand the effects of global change. To better understand the relationships between climate variation and calling activity, we monitored an anuran assemblage in a Puerto Rican wetland by sampling the acoustic environment for one minute every 10 minutes, for 41 months. By automating data coll...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the relationship between acoustic diversity and metrics of vertical forest structure derived from light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data in a neotropical rainforest in Costa Rica. We then used the LIDAR-derived metrics to predict acoustic diversity across the forest landscape. Sound recordings were obtained from 14 sites for six con...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The new field of soundscape ecology seeks to study how the sound diversity varies in the landscape, the soundscape. This soundscape can be another resource that species must deal with. In addition, the soundscape can be used as a monitoring tool for a diversity of animal groups like mammals, birds, anurans, cicadas, an...
Article
In this paper we present an introduction to the physical characteristics of sound, basic recording principles as well as several ways to analyze digital sound files using spectrogram analysis. This paper is designed to be a “primer” which we hope will encourage landscape ecologists to study soundscapes. This primer uses data from a long-term study...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents a unifying theory of soundscape ecology, which brings the idea of the soundscape—the collection of sounds that emanate from landscapes—into a research and application focus. Our conceptual framework of soundscape ecology is based on the causes and consequences of biological (biophony), geophysical (geophony), and human-produce...
Article
Full-text available
We compared the ability of three machine learning algorithms (linear discriminant analysis, decision tree, and support vector machines) to automate the classification of calls of nine frogs and three bird species. In addition, we tested two ways of characterizing each call to train/test the system. Calls were characterized with four standard call v...
Article
There is a need to improve the quantity and quality of data in biodiversity monitoring projects. We compared an automated digital recording system (ADRS) with traditional methods (point-counts and transects) for the assessment of birds and amphibians. The ADRS proved to produce better quantity and quality of data. This new method has 3 additional a...
Article
There is a need to improve the quantity and quality of data in biodiversity monitoring projects. We compared an automated digital recording system (ADRS) with traditional methods (point-counts and transects) for the assessment of birds and amphibians. The ADRS proved to produce better quantity and quality of data. This new method has 3 additional a...
Article
Climate change, land use change and the introduction of exotic species are the three most important anthropogenic threats to the ecosystems and their biodiversity. In order to evaluate the impacts these threats are having, ecologists need better methods to measure, in space and time, the biodiversity in a fast and scalable way. Our group is proposi...

Citations

... Nunes et al. 2012;Andrade et al. 2017). Moreover, complex issues have been accessed from the investigation of call parameters, including social, ecological, and morphological contexts (Toledo et al. 2015;Tonini et al. 2020), phylogenetic relationships, niche conservatism and acoustic niche partitioning (Rossa-Feres & Jim 2001;Sinsch 2012;Villanueva-Rivera 2014;, and character displacement and plasticity (Schluter 2000;Gerhardt & Huber 2002;Pfennig & Pfennig 2009;. ...
... By comparing the differences in the effects of five land properties on different acoustic scenes, we found that a 200 m buffer can be used as the optimal analysis radius for explaining variation in the soundscapes of the urban forests in Guangzhou. Khanaposhtani and Pieretti also explored the relationship between bird sound activity and road distance in forest communities (Ghadiri Khanaposhtani et al., 2019), and both demonstrated the possibility of examining the impacts of anthropogenic activities on acoustic scenes through spatial distance information. Throughout this study, it was found that urban land properties within a 200 m radius explained the greatest amount of each acoustic scene. ...
... The ease of installation and the capacity to automatically record sound at remote locations for long periods of time on user-defined schedules are the main advantages of these devices, increasing the likelihood of detecting a species at a site [6]. However, ARS often produce a substantial number of sound records, which can be time-consuming to process. ...
... antillensis, E. cochranae, E. coqui, E. johnstonei, E. schwartzi: Townsend and Stewart 1986;Ovaska and Hunte 1992;Michael 1996;Bourne 1997;Caldwell 1997a,b, 1999; but see a 4-note call of E. ligiae in Incháustegui et al. 2015), which represents approximately 2.7% of species in the genus. However, Ríos-López and Villanueva-Rivera (2013;their Figure 4) documented a sequence of courtship behavior by the Puerto Rican Plains Coqui, E. juanariveroi. In this species, the body size is the smallest -on average, males reach ~14.7 mm in snout-vent length -and, consequently, has the highest-pitch call among Puerto Rican Eleutherodactylus (Ríos-López and omas 2007), which, to a researcher, could be challenging to detect in the eld. ...
... The soundscape of a given habitat is closely related to the sounds produced by geophysical, biological and anthropogenic sources (Pijanowski and Villanueva-Rivera, 2013). All these sound sources interact with each other and have distinct acoustic signatures with temporal patterns on daily and seasonal time scales (Staaterman et al., 2013;Madan et al., 2018). ...
... Primary factors underlying such heterogeneity remain elusive (Gibbs & Breisch, 2001;Klaus & Lougheed, 2013). However, one reason might be that the environmental cues for amphibian breeding are species-specific (Oseen & Wassersug, 2002), with some associated with temperature (Ospina et al., 2013), rainfall (Saenz et al., 2006;Ulloa et al., 2019), photoperiod (Schalk & Saenz, 2015), and lunar cycle (Grant, Chadwick & Halliday, 2009). ...
... Aquatic ecosystems are composed of a combination of sounds produced by animals (biophonies), physical agents (geophonies) and human activities (anthropophonies) which defines the soundscape (Pijanowski et al., 2011). These particular mixtures of sounds reflect the ecological pattern and processes of specific aquatic environments (Matsinos et al., 2008;Ceraulo et al., 2018). ...
... Using an acoustic scene classification model, we show that while bird song scenes are impacted by forest, bare, and city, urban landscapes have the strongest impacts (Dein and Rüdisser, 2020). Consistent with the effect of bare on bird song scenes we report, a previous horizontal structure study on bird song diversity found features such as forest canopy openness or forest gaps had significant effects (Pekin et al., 2012). Meanwhile, a comparison of the horizontal structural characteristics of natural and planted forests found that bird song diversity was higher in forest communities with higher vegetation cover (Smith et al., 2013), which is consistent with our finding that forest land use has a significant effect on the dominance of bird song scenes. ...
... Soundscapes describe all biological (biophony), geophysical (geophony), and anthropogenic sounds (anthropophony) in an ecosystem (Box 1). Further, soundscapes contain rich information about landscape structure and can be indicators of ecological processes or disturbance (Deichmann et al., 2018;Odom et al., 2021;Pijanowski et al., 2011aPijanowski et al., , 2011bSueur & Farina, 2015;Villanueva-Rivera et al., 2011). ...
... However, some of the most abundant birds in Chilean forests such as the flycatcher Elaenia albiceps (Tyranidae) and the hummingbird Sephanoides sephaniodes (Trochilidae) (e.g., Díaz et al., 2005;Jiménez, 2000) were barely recorded, probably because these species use the foliage, a different substratum that we did not survey for safety and logistical reasons. A combination of different technologies, including automated recorders (e.g., Acevedo et al., 2009;Furnas and Callas, 2015) and camera traps, could help to fulfill this gap in the future. Second, our study was designed to compare the use of different strata by species that are relatively frequent. ...