Lucie Kondrátová's research while affiliated with National Institute of Mental Health and other places

Publications (14)

Article
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Long-stay institutions have been considerably affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to assess the mental health of clients and staff as well as quality and safety of care in long-stay institutions during the state-of-emergency in the Czech Republic in response to COVID-19 pandemic. We found a high prevalence of poor mental health outcomes in...
Article
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Background Stigma among healthcare providers is a barrier to the effective delivery of mental health services in primary care. Few studies have been conducted in primary care settings comparing the attitudes of healthcare providers and experiences of people with mental illness who are service users in those facilities. Such research is necessary ac...
Article
Full-text available
This study sought to evaluate the quality of care in Czech psychiatric hospitals and adherence to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Each psychiatric hospital was evaluated by a team comprising a service user, a psychiatrist, a social worker, a human rights lawyer, and a researcher, all trained in using the World Heal...
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Full-text available
Background Rehospitalization in a year after the first discharge for psychotic disorder is routinely considered as a principal health care outcome. However, there is a lack of data about the rehospitalization rate of people with first-episode psychosis in Central and Eastern Europe where the psychiatric care is predominantly based on inpatient care...
Article
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Background Information about unit costs of psychiatric care is largely unavailable in Central and Eastern Europe, which poses an obstacle to economic evaluations as well as evidence-based development of the care in the region. Objective The objective of this study was to calculate the unit costs of inpatient and community mental health services in...
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Introduction: Specialized services for people in early stages of serious mental illness have positive effect on quality of life, general prognosis of the illness and on long-term costs of mental health system. Objective: The aim of the paper is to analyse care being provided by community social care services for clients in early stages of serious...
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Background: Internalized stigma negatively affects lives and prognosis of individuals with psychosis. Aim: This study aimed to identify correlates of internalized stigma among individuals with psychosis in a sample of community care users in the Czech Republic. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 133 community service users wi...
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Attitudes towards psychiatric medication are an important factor influencing the success of treatment. Mental health care in the region of Central and Eastern Europe remains biologically oriented, yet the attitudes of people with severe mental illnesses are largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to analyze factors of attitudes toward psych...
Article
Background The absence of economic evidence hinders current reforms of hospital-based mental health systems in central and eastern Europe. We aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of discharge to community care for people with chronic psychoses compared with care in psychiatric hospitals in the Czech Republic. Methods We did a prospective study o...
Article
Background Positive findings on early detection and early intervention services have been consistently reported from many different countries. The aim of this study, conducted within the European Brain Council project “The Value of Treatment”, was to estimate costs and the potential cost- savings associated with adopting these services within the c...
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Introduction: People with psychosis are one of the most vulnerable groups in terms of unemployment, poverty and housing issues. The aim of this paper is to analyse the epidemiological and socioeconomic situation of people with a psychotic disorder in the Czech Republic. Method: The data was gathered from multiple sources including: the epidemiologi...
Article
Background: Employment significantly improves the quality of life of people with serious mental illness. However, the effectiveness of different employment models varies. Aims: The aim of this article is to identify approaches towards the employment of people with severe mental illness (SMI) and assess their effectiveness while focusing on both, th...
Article
Full-text available
Just over 25 years have passed since the major sociopolitical changes in central and eastern Europe; our aim was to map and analyse the development of mental health-care practice for people with severe mental illnesses in this region since then. A scoping review was complemented by an expert survey in 24 countries. Mental health-care practice in th...

Citations

... Negative attitudes about people with mental illness are widespread among care providers in low-and middleincome countries (LMICs), including perceptions that they are violent, morally to blame, can only be treated by specialists, and that providing treatment puts providers at risk of developing mental illness [22,36,37,47,52]. In a survey of over 1000 clinical teaching faculty mostly in LMICs, 84% believed psychiatry patients could only be treated in specialized facilities, and 73% reported that psychiatric patients are emotionally draining [55]. ...
... The themes are organised into standards, which consist of different criteria (see the example in Fig. 1). The QualityRights Toolkit has been previously used in other countries, such as India, 22 Chile, 23 the Czech Republic 24 and Tunisia, 25 to assess the quality of mental health services and is appropriate for the same purpose in West Africa. ...
... Last but not least, PPI has seen increasing, although still rather marginal, participation of patients in health care research, such as in the area of mental health care [38] . ...
... To facilitate the transformation process within forensic psychiatry field, we translated structured professional assessment tools HCR-20 V3 , SAPROF and SVR-20 V2 (Halouzková et al., 2020;Vňuková et al., 2020). Furthermore, there is an increasing pressure to measure the effectiveness of and use of outcome measures (Broulíková et al., 2019;Gibbons & McCarthy, 2015;Winkler et al., 2018) and for this reason systematic needs mapping and quality of life assessment are introduced into routine care evaluation (Kalisova et al., 2018;Páv et al., 2017). ...
... Self-stigma and eventually internalized stigma lead to low self-esteem, depression, delayed treatment-seeking, long duration of untreated illness and poor quality of life [3,7]. Additionally, compared to neurosis, psychotic illnesses like schizophrenia have high heritability, and are considered equivalent with insanity, and aggression [7] leading to more pervasive stigma [7][8][9][10][11]. ...
... Our first important finding was that a negative attitude to treatment is implicated in both perceived-and self-stigma, in keeping with associations between self-stigma and negative medication attitudes (Feldhaus et al., 2018;Kondrátová et al., 2019;Uhlmann et al., 2014) or medication non-adherence (Lien et al., 2018). Psychosocial factors, like clinical barriers (e.g., side-effects), could underlie maladaptive medication-related beliefs (Martins et al., 2019). ...
... In these cases, the connection of CMHTs with GPs, EMS, and hospital allowed the resolution of highly complex somatic conditions, like detecting iatrogenic psychosis. Unfortunately, CMHTs are not commonly seen in South Eastern European countries, but there are several initiatives and pilot programs that aim to develop and sustain community-based mental health services, including CMHTs (31,47,48). They are intended mostly for patients with SMI as an enforcement for rehospitalization prevention and overall admission reduction. ...
... 19,28 Of these, 187 full texts were examined for eligibility and 132 studies were identified as reporting cost information for any country. For the nine European countries of interest, evidence was identified for Italy (eight studies), [29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36] the Czech Republic (four), [37][38][39][40] Greece (three), [41][42][43] Portugal (two), 44,45 Hungary, and Poland (one each). 46,47 No literature was identified for Bulgaria, Romania, or Slovakia, so cost estimates were obtained via local expert opinion. ...
... Due to the heterogeneity of experts, sub-analyses were conducted to determine whether a country region or area of expertise significantly affected results. The sub-analysis by classification of countries was based on geographical area and resulted in two country groups: (1) Western Europe & Australia: Australia, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Spain; and 2) Central & Eastern Europe: Hungary, Albania, Kosovo [48]. For the sub-analysis regarding area of expertise, the experts were grouped as follows: 1) experts representing the construction, health or ICT sectors; (2) academic experts; (3) experts representing SME organisations; and (4) representatives of labour or advocacy groups or occupational health specialist association groups. ...