Louise Humpage's research while affiliated with University of Auckland and other places

Publications (49)

Article
Full-text available
Welfare reforms have swept across most liberal-democratic nations over recent decades, carried by a deep neoliberal faith in market rationality and an intensive focus on the individual as a key site of disciplinary intervention. These reforms have been accompanied by discourses within which welfare, deviance and crime are interwoven tightly. Austra...
Article
Conditional welfare, a social policy mechanism in which disadvantaged groups are required to conform to behavioural changes to receive income support, has become an influential policy mechanism in recent decades. Conditional welfare in Australia involves compulsory income management (CIM), comprising the quarantining of between 50 and 90 per cent o...
Article
Conditional welfare policies are frequently underpinned by pejorative representations of those they target. Vulnerable children, under physical or moral threat from their welfare-dependent parents, are a mainstay of these constructions, yet the nuances of this trope have received little focused attention. Through a discourse analysis of parliamenta...
Article
Welfare conditionality, whereby eligibility for income support payments is linked to prescribed forms of behaviour or values, is intended to encourage responsible behaviour in marginalised populations. However in practice, it may have consequences that worsen rather than improve their life chances. One of the most invasive forms of conditional welf...
Article
Governments are increasingly intrigued by the possibility of harnessing the private ‘social investment’ market to finance the delivery of social services. One social investment initiative in particular – Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) – has spread extensively within the global North. This article investigates the transnational mobility of SIBs by explo...
Article
Conditional welfare has become a prominent policy tool in recent years. One of the harshest forms of conditional welfare in Australia is arguably compulsory income management (CIM) which involves the quarantining of between 50 and 90 per cent of a participant’s benefit payment for spending on food, rent and other essential items. A leading aim of a...
Article
Welfare conditionality, where income support payments are tied to prescribed activities or alternatively good behaviour, has intensified in recent years. The toughest form of conditional welfare is arguably compulsory income management (IM), which involves the quarantining of between 50 and 90 per cent of a participant’s benefit payment for spendin...
Article
Surveillance and governance of the poor have been key foci for the critical social policy literature for some time, although scholarship regarding the role of big data in social policy – and how this might differ from previous forms of surveillance – is continuing to emerge. This article contributes to this literature by exploring the use of big da...
Article
New Zealand and Australia have both adopted compulsory income management and an actuarially-based “social investment” approach since 2012, suggesting the two countries engaged in “policy transfer” and that their policy settings have converged over the past decade. Focusing on four of the six types of policy convergence identified by Hay [Hay, C. 20...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report summarises findings from a comparative study of compulsory income management policies in Australia and New Zealand.
Article
Qualitative life-history narratives investigating the portability of political and civil society beliefs/behaviours of 42 New Zealand returnees help us to understand why some citizens engage in political and civil society activities while living overseas and on return. Personal beliefs such as civic duty, rights and self-interest are strongly assoc...
Article
Compulsory Income Management (CIM) is a form of conditional welfare that involves the mandatory quarantining of a portion of welfare recipients’ social security payments. Quarantined funds are accessible via a government‐issued debit card, with restrictions surrounding where and on what funds can be spent. Official justifications of CIM have framed...
Article
Full-text available
‘Vulnerability’ is a key concept used to understand the ethical implications of conducting refugee-focused research. This case study illustrates the need to follow Luna’s (2009) call for a shift from a ‘labels’ to a ‘layers’ approach to vulnerability by analysing how two university ethics committees responded to issues of informed consent in two si...
Article
Full-text available
This article draws on qualitative interview data with 42 New Zealanders returning to New Zealand after living overseas, finding they feel more like a ‘migrant’ than someone coming ‘home’. This is in part because New Zealand people and institutions demonstrate an intolerance to difference, theorised here as a form of xenophobia that inhibits the eco...
Article
This article explores the relative strength of public support for ascriptive and civic aspects of national identity to assess the boundaries of ‘inclusion’ or ‘exclusion’ within New Zealand’s national imaginary. Data from the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) module on citizenship in 2015 provide a unique window into public understanding...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents a Photovoice project that explores the narratives of five young women of Eritrean heritage living in New Zealand. The photographs taken by the women suggest that their current individual and collective identities are mediated by two different kinds of 'memories': 'post-memories' of an absent past in their ancestral country tha...
Article
Indigenous Māori in New Zealand have had significant opportunities to influence mainstream politics and policy since 2008 when the Māori Party began negotiating supply and confidence agreements with the conservative National Party in return for progress on Māori Party initiatives. This article assesses whether the Māori Party has made a difference...
Article
New Zealand has ratified many of the same international instruments instructing resettled refugees' rights as other resettlement countries. However, New Zealand has adopted broad strategies with little policy specificity or funding to ensure settling refugees' rights are upheld. In examining selected rights, this article demonstrates that New Zeala...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2008, mature welfare states have, to varying degrees, pursued a strategy of welfare reform that has reconfigured the dominant praxis of social citizenship. Drawing on qualitative data from two studies, this paper explores what bearing this has had on the political subjectivity of welfare claimants in the New Zealand context. The findings sugg...
Article
There is a long‐standing debate in the comparative welfare state literature as to whether social policy regimes come to look more alike over time (“converge”) or else retain their distinctiveness. In this article, we explore this question through a detailed interrogation of the social policy record since 1996 of three states widely classified as “l...
Article
Income management, which reduces the control that benefit recipients have over social security income by quarantining a percentage for approved expenses, was introduced in both Australia and New Zealand in the late 2000s. In Australia, income management explicitly targeted Indigenous communities, being initiated as part of the Northern Territory Em...
Article
Have increasing levels of conditionality fundamentally changed the attitudes of the unemployed towards social security, work obligations and welfare dependency? Both neopaternalist and governmentalist theorising suggests that workfare policies should have shifted this group's conceptions of self-interest over time yet previous evidence has been rat...
Article
Dean (2004)'s taxonomy of moral repertoires explains contradictory and complex responses to questions about social citizenship in Britain. But are the moral repertoires identified in Britain relevant to other English-speaking 'liberal' welfare states? Analysis of interview and focus group data finds the taxonomy is useful for exploring ambivalent a...
Article
Neo-liberalism represents a significant and enduring shift in the politics shaping social policy. Although frequently ascribed a hegemonic, all-powerful status that focuses our attention on the coherence found in neo-liberal policies, this article builds on scholarly work highlighting variegation in the neo-liberal project across different policy a...
Book
Neoliberal reforms have seen a radical shift in government thinking about social citizenship rights around the world. But have they had a similarly significant impact on public support for these rights? This unique book traces public views on social citizenship across three decades through attitudinal data from New Zealand, the United Kingdom and A...
Conference Paper
Neoliberalism represents a significant and enduring shift in the politics shaping social policy. Although it is frequently ascribed a hegemonic, all-powerful status that focuses our attention on the coherence found in neoliberal policies, this paper is influenced by scholars highlighting variegation in the neoliberal project across different policy...
Article
It is often assumed that neo-liberal reform has had a significant and negative impact on public support for social citizenship rights. This paper tests such an assumption by reviewing New Zealand public attitudes associated with social rights of citizenship across two decades. While acknowledging the issues that make it difficult to draw comparison...
Article
Did significant policy shifts in employment relations in the 1990s lead to equally large changes in the attitudes of New Zealanders towards employment relations? Have policy modifications made since 1999 further shaped public perceptions? This paper explores the role of policy feedback in influencing public opinion towards employers and unions and...
Article
Although welfare states have been categorised according to a wide but never conclusive range of dimensions, little attention has been paid to the specific forms of recognitive justice that influence the development of the welfare state, particularly in countries where internally colonised indigenous peoples not only constitute a disproportionate nu...
Article
The last 30 years has seen significant change in social policy regarding indigenous peoples living in advanced welfare states. However, such change has not been uniform even in ‘liberal’ welfare states where the recognitive claims of indigenous peoples have been most widely endorsed by governments. This article proposes a tentative framework for qu...
Article
  School should be a ‘culturally safe’ place, particularly for those students in Christchurch who challenge the city's reputation as a culturally homogeneous space and are thus frequently open to discrimination. A case study focusing on Somali refugee adolescents highlights that Christchurch's secondary schools – like those elsewhere in New Zealand...
Article
International empirical evidence, including that from Australia, suggests that neoliberal reform has not changed public attitudes towards the social rights of citizenship as much as one might predict. But do these international findings hold true for New Zealand, whose institutions were more rapidly transformed by neoliberal reform than similar cou...
Article
Governments in settler societies conventionally have regarded the incorporation of indigenous peoples into the equal rights of citizenship as an appropriate response to indigenous calls for justice. Yet, the state nation-building agendas behind citizenship sit in tension with indigenous nationalisms, which reflect an alternative form of nation-buil...
Article
Using New Zealand and Australian examples, this article provides evidence that neoliberalism is both coherent and diverse. An analysis of government initiatives focused on 'improving government performance' regarding indigenous outcomes and indigenous 'capacity building' illustrates how 'performance management' has legitimated and extended neoliber...
Article
This paper fleshes out the rather sparse empirical literature on citizenship with data collected from seven focus groups involving a wide range of New Zealanders. Results indicate that the term “citizenship” is relatively unimportant to identity and belonging compared to “family” and “community”. Yet there is considerable agreement about the key el...
Article
In discourse around disability there has been a shift away from a ‘medical model’, which perceives disability as an individual problem to be ‘cured’ or contained, towards a ‘social model’. The latter focuses on the relationship between people with disabilities and their social environment, locating the required interventions within the realm of soc...
Article
Existing literature, which has emerged largely from Europe and Britain, suggests that the concepts of social exclusion and inclusion are fundamentally limited when accounting for ‘difference’. This paper extends this literature by considering the way in which a social exclusion/inclusion discourse has played out in a ‘white settler’ society where t...
Article
Full-text available
This paper utilizes an analytical distinction between three modes of social belonging to explain the ambiguous resettlement experiences of refugees granted a temporary protection visa (TPV) in Australia. Findings from two qualitative studies indicate that the dominance of a public discourse that depicts asylum seekers as "illegals" inhibits their s...
Article
Qualitative studies undertaken in Australia suggest that the temporary protection visa (TPV) inhibits successful refugee resettlement. A community development intervention has begun to address the redistributive and recognitive injustices faced by refugees on TPVs, pointing to the need for more precise concepts than social inclusion when discussing...
Article
This article bridges a gap in the literature by considering the application of a whole of government approach to indigenous issues in advanced economy societies. It highlights that indigenous disadvantage may be considered one of the 'wicked problems' to which whole of government approaches are best suited. Using the example of capacity building in...
Article
I am writing this submission as an individual. I am a lecturer in social policy, whose teaching and research focuses on welfare and other policy issues. I thus bring to this submission considerable historical and contemporary knowledge about New Zealand social policy, in addition to knowledge of alternative policy practice internationally. I do not...
Article
Public support for social citizenship has never been as strong in liberal welfare states as elsewhere and there have been predictions that neoliberal reforms would further weaken support for social citizenship rights in these countries. Such predictions have not been fully supported by international empirical evidence. British and Australian resear...

Citations

... Indeed, First Nations peoples have at times been explicitly targeted in purported state efforts to end the cycle of intergenerational 'welfare dependency' in Indigenous communities and encourage economic contribution through paid work (e.g. Marston et al., 2022). Government discourses surrounding such interventions have appealed to interlocking racial, class and gender stereotypes to construct Indigenous welfare recipients as problem subjects who are undeserving of state support . ...
... So I would like to just eat well and live comfortable and it doesn't happen. (in Peterie et al., 2019a: 807) Social stigmatisation can also lead income support recipients to withdraw from their social networks, compounding isolation and disadvantage Peterie et al., 2019aPeterie et al., , 2019bPeterie et al., , 2022Ramia et al., 2020). In essence, welfare conditionality and the pejorative narratives that have accompanied it impose social harm, pushing already disadvantaged income support recipients deeper into social and economic hardship. ...
... These social security 'reforms' have coincided with and been facilitated by the political reframing of social problems such as un(der)employment and social security receipt as issues of individual shortcoming. Income support recipients have been represented not as deserving claimants of social support, but as appropriate targets of state surveillance, chastisement, and, ultimately, violence (Marston, 2008;Peterie et al., 2019bPeterie et al., , 2021. This narrative is implicit in conditionality measures themselves, in that mutual obligations target individual behaviour, rather than addressing the structural factors that lead some people to access state support. ...
... Recent discussions on developers as embedded 'relational actors' for instance, has called attention to their ability to draw on circulating models of financing and urbanism while coordinating complex institutional contexts (Brill 2020;Mouton and Shatkin 2020). Thirdly, there is also a tendency to fetishize the speed at which policies circulate as 'ready-made' and 'quick fixes' that disregards the often long temporal processes in which policies mature and are implemented (Grimwood et al. 2021;Ward 2018;Wood 2015). Policymaking is often characterized by non-linearity with learning taking on multiple references and by the legacies of previous studies and non-successful attempts. ...
... Of course, as is made clear by several articles in this special edition, it will take more than ethical principles and charters to drive meaningful change in the ways in which Big Data is utilised in government and beyond. We need thoughtful capacity building and systems-level understanding of data ethics, transparency and accountability regimes (Staines et al 2021), co-creation of data models and recognising indigenous data sovereignty (Walter et al 2021). ...
... Another key reason for the negligible impact of IM on AOD use was that IM participants were easily able to circumvent spending restrictions by exchanging either their Cards or goods for cash, pooling cash to purchase alcohol beyond trial sites, or by engaging in theft or sex work to secure alternative sources of income. Similar findings concerning circumvention by participants to purchase prohibited goods emerged from an associated research study of money management in New Zealand which is the only other country that has introduced a form of IM (Humpage 2018). Thus the policy is also ineffective. ...
... Within the Aotearoa New Zealand context, research indicates that that the current neoliberal framework for social work and social services has proved challenging (Humpage, 2019;Hyslop, 2013;O'Brien, 2009O'Brien, , 2016Sawyers, 2016). Although a focus of social work is "to inform society at large about the injustices in its midst, and to engage in action to change the structures of society that create and perpetuate injustice" (Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers [ANZASW], 2019, p. 7), this may be easier said than done. ...
... A nationwide survey carried out in 2019 at the initiative of the Ministry of Family, Labor and Social Policy showed that there were 30,330 homeless people in Poland, of which 82.1% were men, 14.6% women and 3.3% children [11]. Most of them (24,323) were institutionalized and concentrated in urban regions [9]. ...
... There is a common assumption that informed consent is achieved when research participants sign a form that serves as documentary evidence of consent (Barsky, 2010;Humpage et al., 2019;Pranati, 2010). However, refugees may have second thoughts about signing, a concern that raises the issues of "vulnerability" of this group of study participants (Block et al., 2013;Obijiofor et al., 2018). ...
... Leaving aside debates regarding what exactly constitutes New Zealand customs (Bell, 2009(Bell, , 2014McIntosh et al., 2005), the final question of this component asks whether minorities should assimilate. Unlike questions relating to in-group exclusivity, these are both components of national identity that may be attained, albeit with some effort, by immigrants (Humpage & Greaves, 2017): ...