Lisanne Bainbridge's research while affiliated with University College London and other places

Publications (7)

Article
This paper discusses the ways in which automation of industrial processes may expand rather than eliminate problems with the human operator. Some comments will be made on methods of alleviating these problems within the 'classic' approach of leaving the operator with responsibility for abnormal conditions, and on the potential for continued use of...
Article
This paper discusses the ways in which automation of industrial processes may expand rather than eliminate problems with the human operator. Some comments will be made on methods of alleviating these problems within the 'classic' approach of leaving the operator with responsibility for abnormal conditions, and on the potential for continued use of...
Article
This paper discusses the ways in which automation of industrial processes may expand rather than eliminate problems with the human operator. Some comments will be made on methods of alleviating these problems within the ‘classic’ approach of leaving the operator with responsibility for abnormal conditions, and on the potential for continued use of...
Chapter
Within the context of this conference, we want to know the factors which affect human ability to detect and diagnose process failures, as a basis for console and job design. Understandably, human factors engineers want fully specified models for the human operator’s behaviour. It is also understandable that these engineers should make use of modell...
Article
This paper suggests that the nature of process control skill lies in the changed decision making made possible with increased knowledge of process behaviour. During learning, feedback about process output indicates that the process needs correcting, and also that the operator must adjust his choice of action. An experienced operator knows the corre...
Chapter
‘Process’ industries make such products as paper, electricity, steel and petrochemicals. In these industries the men do not work directly on the product but control the process machines within which input materials are converted into products which meet required specifications.

Citations

... The typical aim of automation is to replace human manual control with automated control through the application of computing devices [9]. However, there are several issues related to the assumption that a user tasked with the role of a supervisor of automation will be able to effectively execute this role. ...
... The benefits might be particularly relevant in patients that require a lot of attention and receive several medications and interventions concurrently, as such situations are especially demanding. Similar expectations were held for previous generations of clinical decision support systems, as well as more broadly for highly automated systems across different industries, but numerous studies as well as accident investigations demonstrated that the assumption that automation reduces human error and thereby improves safety is overly simplistic (Cabitza et al., 2017;Bainbridge, 1983;Alberdi et al., 2004). ...
... For example, if working memory capacity is reduced, analytic reflections are more difficult, which might induce the operator to move from a reflective, forward-planning approach to a 'trial-and-error'-approach. Another example refers to operators changing from the system management strategy of 'open-loop control' to one involving 'closed-loop control' , with the latter requiring fewer cognitive resources (see Bainbridge 1978). ...
... Dealing with complexity is complicated by the fact that the goal state is underspecified. General goals set by the management typically are insufficient as guidelines for control decisions (Bainbridge 1981), the target changes dynamically as a function of demand, and optimal parameter values differ between situations. Accordingly, operators need to engage in goal setting and dynamic prioritization. ...
... This safety-critical situation was further supported by the notion of automation surprise (cf. Bainbridge, 1983), which the focus group explicitly considered to be a serious issue related to the introduction of ADAS. To facilitate safe usage of ADAS or ADS, the focus group urged to have ADAS intuitive, easy, and fun, and (perhaps most importantly) to not have drivers be required to monitor an ADS as a key task during driving, nor to have it be a part of future driver training as that was considered not viable, since it requires extensive training and certain personal characteristics not possesses by everybody (cf. ...
... The relationship between the ability to raise individual SA and driver skill shows that advanced driver training may improve driver situation awareness [29]. Walker et al. [25] found that advanced driver training may improve working memory capabilities that result in the improvement in driver situation awareness. ...