Lisa R. Fortuna's research while affiliated with University of California, San Francisco and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Religion and spirituality (R/S) have been influential in societies' history, daily life, and identity in the past and in today's society. From a sociological perspective, R/S contributes to family development and organization, influences culture, and often contributes to forming opinions, beliefs, and concepts about oneself, family, society, and th...
Article
Objective: To understand providers' perceptions of how patient's experience of racism may impact successful implementation of a brief PTSD treatment in the safety net integrated primary care setting. To conduct a developmental formative evaluation prior to a hybrid type I effectiveness-implementation trial. Data sources and study setting: From O...
Article
Full-text available
Co-design of digital mental health technology with youth and families is a relatively new but growing approach to intervention development. In this perspective article, researchers used collaborative reflexivity through duoethnography methodology to reflect and report on experiences and lessons learned conducting co-designed projects with marginali...
Article
A National Academy of Medicine report published in 1993 defined disparities in health care as "a difference in access or treatment provided to members of different racial or ethnic groups that is not justified by the underlying health conditions or treatment preferences of the groups."1 Disparities in access to and quality of mental health services...
Article
BACKGROUND Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition in children. Although ADHD is treatable, barriers remain to engagement in treatment, especially among socioeconomically disadvantaged and racial and ethnic minority families. Our goal was to examine the process by which families engage in ADHD treatm...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To describe the development of a protocol and practical tool for the safe delivery of telemental health (TMH) services to the home. The COVID-19 pandemic forced providers to rapidly transition their outpatient practices to home-based TMH (HB-TMH) without existing protocols or tools to guide them. This experience underscored the need for...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic prompted the rapid transformation of child mental health services from mostly in-person to fully remote delivery at an urban safety-net hospital. No-show rates substantially declined when implementing video visits, and the volume of service delivery was unchanged compared to prepandemic in-person visits. In addition, no-show r...
Article
Objective A consortium of eight academic child and adolescent psychiatry programs in the United States and Canada examined their pivot from in-person, clinic-based services to home-based telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aims were to document the transition across diverse sites and present recommendations for future telehealth service pl...
Article
Self-harm, hurting oneself with or without suicidal intent, is associated with poor mental health. Domains of risk known to be associated with self-harm include sociodemographic factors such as female gender, negative life events, family adversity, and psychiatric diagnoses.1 However, the heterogeneous nature of self-harm makes predicting risk and...
Article
Over 50% of young adults (defined as individuals aged 18-25 years) with substance use disorders (SUDs) have at least 1 co-occurring psychiatric disorder, and the presence of co-occurring disorders worsens SUD outcomes. Treatment of both co-occurring psychiatric disorders and SUDs in young adults is imperative for optimal treatment, yet many barrier...

Citations

... For example, families of minoritized children in treatment of ADHD have described specific stages of engagement-from processing stigma to becoming advocates for their child to gaining empowerment through support and informationthat are opportunities for clinicians to join families in this process more collaboratively. 65 ...
... Researchers have presented guidance and lessons learned about how to proactively engage patients in services during this period of heightened stress. Recommendations include consumer engagement in planning efforts, leveraging technology, building systems that can adapt rapidly, and attending to staff burnout and equity in services (Abid et al., 2020;Aboumatar, 2020;Hefner et al., 2021;Musialowski et al., 2021;Tolou-Shams et al., 2021). ...
... Additionally, the use of telecare in rural areas and among patients with a lower income is inadequate. Lack of resources and supplies, the accessibility of medical facilities, and internet access result in the variation in the utilization of telehealth [40][41][42][43]. Other important limits are that the income and social-economic status of telehealth users affect the effectiveness and adequate use of telehealth platforms [43,44]. ...
... Machine learning as a statistical technique is limited by generalisability and the risk of overfitting. 39 Our findings are relatively resistant to these limitations compared to previous studies because of the large national dataset used, but external validation would be required to establish reproducibility in a real-world setting. We were unable to assess potential causative mechanisms for the risk of self-harm. ...
... However, SBIRT provision in these settings must be tailored to address key socio-cultural and structural factors that impede minoritized youth's initiation and engagement in substance use treatment, such as perceived racial discrimination, stigma, and lack of cultural sensitivity (Acevedo et al., 2020). For example, screening and brief interventions should be culturally informed (Green, 2018), account for the systemically oppressive sources of stress tied to substance use among racial and ethnic minority youth (Criss et al., 2016), and be tailored for youth with exposure to trauma and adverse childhood experiences (Spencer et al., 2021). ...
... As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, access to mental health care for children and adolescents will become increasingly important and will stimulate the field to utilize innovations in mental health care delivery during the crisis and beyond. 24,25 While physical distancing measures have mandated the rapid uptake of tele-mental health services use during the pandemic, 26,27 an iterative approach is warranted for its implementation and evaluation with broad system-level considerations in order to ensure access matches the current and changing needs of the population. Furthermore, child and youth mental health services have long been under-resourced, 28 with many accessing the mental health care system for the first time in the ED. ...