Linda Jones's research while affiliated with Milton Keynes College and other places

Publications (5)

Article
A sample of 349 young people, aged 13 or 14, in three locations in the English Midlands participated in this study, which examines how young people perceive and handle risk in relation to travel and locality. The findings, drawn from survey and focus-group research, highlight differences between the three locations in terms of young people's percep...
Article
Children and young people have been conceptualised in urban planning as problems and the result has been their marginalisation and increasing exclusion from a hostile urban environment. We need to learn more about their needs and aspirations, if health promoters and urban policy-makers are to transform children's environments and improve their qual...
Article
Children are major users of their local environments yet they are largely excluded from discussions about transport, planning and environmental health, and may be seen only as 'problems' or 'victims'. However, if children's own accounts are studied it is clear that they are active risk-assessors and problem-solvers who develop strategies to survive...
Article
Children's independent mobility and access are routinely undermined by the structures and constraining values of contemporary urban environments. Although they are major users of their local areas, children are conspicuous by their absence in discussions about transport, planning and environmental health and there have been few attempts in the UK t...

Citations

... Garrard et al., 2008), in other words, where risk and/or perceived risk of cycling are higher, women, children (or parents on their behalf), and older people are even more likely to be deterred than are men and younger adults. The concern for safety among children has been found to be greater in large cities than in smaller towns (Jones, Davis, & Eyers, 2000), possibly due to differences in traffic volume. This may explain our finding of greater underrepresentation of children in the selected cities than in nationwide urban areas, as the latter is dominated by multiple smaller urban areas. ...
... When children do participate, their views are generally at odds with adult views of what constitutes a suitable environment for children, how land should be developed, and how it should be used (Matthews 1995;Passon, Levi, and Del Rio 2008;Chawla 2002b;Freeman and Riordan 2002;Robins 1996;Simpson 1997). This disconnect can then result in issues where children's input is dismissed as impractical or frivolous or simply misunderstood (Horelli 1997;Bartlett 1999;Severcan 2015;Magnussen and Elming 2015;Cele and Van Der Burgt 2015) including by the researchers themselves (Rismanchian and Rismanchian 2007), and children may manipulate their responses in a desire to please, or they misunderstand the expectations (Bosco and Joassart-Marcelli 2015;Sutton and Kemp 2002;Davis and Jones 1997;Parnell and Patsarika 2011) or challenges occur with implementation beyond the activity of participation rendering the participatory process as tokenistic (Frank 2006;Alparone and Rissotto 2001;Passon, Levi, and Del Rio 2008;Horelli and Kaaja 2002;Cele and Van Der Burgt 2015;Severcan 2015). ...
... Research on the impact of urban environments on the lives of children has been the subject of different disciplines, ranging from health studies (Davis and Jones 1996) to legal studies, pedagogy, psychology and sociology, and from urban geography (Christensen and O'Brien 2003) to urban planning and urban design (Danenberg et al, 2019). Interdisciplinary studies around the world converge to the conclusion that urban space is instrumental for environmental learning process and development of necessary social skills; the quality of open public space in a city greatly influences interpersonal relationships in childhood but also later on, in adult life (Lennard and Lennard, 1992). ...
... • Type of outdoor active behaviour: One study used the frequency of outdoor play, exercise, sport and active commuting [43]. Active independent mobility (AIM) was primarily derived by asking children for a list of destinations they are allowed to go to on their own or with a friend without an adult [15,34,35,38,46]. However, one study by Page et al. distinguished between two types of IM, namely Local IM and Area IM [43]. ...
... Indeed, less than 9% of 7-to 8year-olds now travel to school unaccompanied by an adult, compared with 80% in the early 1970s. This has been attributed to parental fear of traffic (Davis, 1999; see also Jones and Davis, 2001). As stated by Frank and Engelke (2002), 'the relative costs and benefits of the locational and travel choices that are currently available have resulted in a built environment designed to accommodate the car -at the measurable expense of the ability to move about under human power' (p. ...