Liang Shao's research while affiliated with University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Full-text available
Psychologists have not determined the defining characteristics of extraversion. In four studies, the authors tested the hypothesis that extraversion facets are linked by reward sensitivity. According to this hypothesis, only facets that reflect reward sensitivity should load on a higher order extraversion factor. This model was tested against a mod...
Article
There are marked variations between nations in reported subjective well-being (SWB), but the explanations for this diversity have not been fully explored. It is possible that the differences are entirely due to true variability in SWB, but it is also reasonable that the differences may be due to factors related to self-report measurement such as va...

Citations

... Culturally, the differences between countries are not substantial, only high individualism (vs. collectivism) consistently predicted differences in LS between nations when controlling for other variables (Diener et al., 1995). Based on findings from the early 1990s, Czech adolescents did not differ significantly in LS from adolescents across Europe (Macek, 1999). ...
... It refers to relatively stable individual differences in the tendency to experience and exhibit positive affect, to show assertive behavior and decisive thinking, and to experience desires for social attention (Wilt & Revelle, 2009). Theoretical and empirical work suggests several key features of extraversion including a tendency to evoke and enjoy social attention (Ashton, Lee, & Paunonen, 2002), a sensitivity to potential rewards and activation of the reward system in social situations (Denissen & Penke, 2008;Lucas, Diener, Grob, Suh, & Shao, 2000), and a tendency to experience frequent positive affect (Fleeson, Malanos, Flirting situations as opportunities for the expression of extraversion One particular triggering situation for the expression of extraversion is flirting with a potential partner because of romantic interest and attraction. Flirting is a universal and enjoyable form of interaction (Guerrero, Andersen, & Afifi, 2018) that includes verbal and nonverbal communication (e.g., giving compliments; La France, 2015) and different motivations to engage in flirting behavior (e.g., flirting to explore potential interest; Henningsen, Braz, & Davies, 2008). ...