Li-Qiu Wang's research while affiliated with Nanjing Forestry University and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Full-text available
Data capturing multiple axes of tree size and shape, such as a tree's stem diameter, height and crown size, underpin a wide range of ecological research - from developing and testing theory on forest structure and dynamics, to estimating forest carbon stocks and their uncertainties, and integrating remote sensing imagery into forest monitoring prog...
Article
Full-text available
The influences of trait diversity (i.e., the niche complementarity effect) and functional composition (i.e., the mass ratio effect) on aboveground biomass (AGB) is a highly debated topic in forest ecology. Therefore, further studies are needed to explore these mechanisms in unstudied forest ecosystems to enhance our understanding, and to provide gu...
Cover Page
Full-text available
A broad conceptual model (upper portion) linking the effects of abiotic factors on biotic factors (functional trait diversity and identity), and then their joint effects on aboveground biomass (AGB) of metacommunities in global forests. The concept of metacommunities is generally and graphically highlighted (see a circle of the biotic factors), i.e...
Article
Full-text available
Although several studies have identified the effects of functional trait diversity (FTD) and/or identity, i.e. the community-weighted mean (CWM) of a trait, on aboveground biomass (AGB) along abiotic conditions, these effects on AGB in global forest metacommunities are still largely unexplored. Here, we modelled the effects of abiotic (i.e. climate...
Article
Full-text available
Although approximately three decades ago the ecological role of big-sized trees (also known as either large, large-diameter, mega, oversized or big trees) has been recognized in the scientific literature, the reviews synthesizing our current knowledge and perspectives on the ecological influences of big-sized trees on aboveground biomass, productiv...
Article
In forest ecosystems, it is debated which measure of biodiversity should better explain aboveground biomass (AGB). Here, we hypothesized that high species richness, evolutionary diversity and individual tree size variation drive higher AGB in tropical forests but dependent on local-scale tropical forest types. For this, we analyzed the data of 101...
Article
Questions Do stand density, species diversity and individual tree‐size variation jointly increase aboveground biomass (AGB) along elevational gradient? 2) How does local‐scale elevational gradient explain the variation in AGB directly and indirectly via stand density, species diversity facet and individual tree‐size variation? 3) What are the main...
Article
The relationships between plant functional traits and aboveground biomass (AGB) stock has been explored across forest biomes. Yet, meta-analyses synthesizing our understanding regarding the influences of climate and soil on the functional traits – AGB relationships at a community-level in global forests are still unavailable. Here, we evaluated the...
Article
Tropical forests play a main role in the global carbon cycle due to their higher exchange capacity of carbon dioxide with the atmosphere than any other forest type on the Earth. In this study, we aimed to explore the relative importance of foremost species and topmost trees in shaping forest structure, diversity and biomass in natural tropical fore...

Citations

... Moreover, it is well recognized that blue carbon is impacted by salinity (Rahman et al., 2015;Rahman et al., 2021a), which raises new questions about whether salinity-modified functional variables follow the powerlaw (i.e., Y = a X b or log Y = log a + b log X) or not, which is critical to explain how one variable potentially impacts other variables (Duncanson et al., 2015). Exploring these consistent patterns provides crucial key information for understating forest dynamics (Farrior et al., 2016) and can be linked with metabolic scaling theory (MST) predictions (i.e., various size and shape should scale one another) (Jucker et al., 2022;Shenkin et al., 2020). There are several examples in forest ecology that follow powerlaw distribution such as tree height and diameter relationships (H∝D 2/3 ) (Duncanson et al., 2015;Jucker et al., 2022), and tree-size distribution (i.e., dominant and suppressed) (Farrior et al., 2016), but not commonly seen to use in functional variables and in mangrove. ...
... In this expectation, AGB will not have positive correlation with diversity, while the functional traits of the dominant species may cause higher aboveground biomass storage. For example, under unfavorable environmental conditions, niche complementarity effect may affect AGB, while under favorable environmental conditions, due to competitive exclusion, mass ratio effect has a greater impact (Paquette and Messier, 2011;Wang and Ali, 2022). However, in temperate forests, different studies have produced different results (van der Plas, 2019), with some finding that diversity plays a major role (Ding and Zang, 2021), while others find that functional traits (Wang and Ali, 2022) and stand structural diversity (Fotis et al., 2017) play a much larger role than diversity. ...
... Forests play an irreplaceable role in human survival and sustainable development [1]. They affect the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, soil formation, nutrient cycling [2], subtropical regions are relatively few [28]. Subtropical areas are rich in forest resources and feature high densities, complex forest stands and mixed forests of different species, which can complicate remote sensing-based identification. ...
... The positive relationship between the community-weighted mean (CWM) of trait values and AWC also indicates the mass ratio hypothesis [29]. A high CWM of acquisitive traits (e.g., maximum tree height and specific leaf area) could result in high photosynthetic rates [9,15,30,31]. Previous studies [12,14,32] have shown that the community-weighted mean of leaf traits could predict the aboveground biomass. ...
... However, the effect of species abundance on the aboveground biomass was negative. Although communities with high species abundance (number of individuals) may directly contribute to the aboveground biomasss (Ali et al., 2020;Kunwar et al., 2021), communities with high species abundance are more likely to contain small trees, which contribute less to the aboveground biomass than large trees (Slik et al., 2013;Kazempour Larsary et al., 2021). There is competition among individuals of similar sizes in the acquisition and use of resources (Kazempour Larsary et al., 2021), which leads to a decrease in productivity. ...
... Large trees not only play a crucial role in determining C stocks but also timber yield and forest structure, as they sustain biodiversity and act as drivers of hydrological cycles (Forrester, 2021;Jucker et al., 2022), yet are globally endangered (Lindenmayer et al., 2012). The study of large trees is challenging because of their low density and longevity (Sheil et al., 2017;Wang and Ali, 2021). ...
... Compared to temperate and boreal forests, tropical forests are generally characterized by numerous climate and soil factors, but high mean annual precipitation, evapotranspiration and mean annual temperature, as well as low or inconsistent soil nutrients, are some of the general characteristics (Clark et al., 2003;Quesada et al., 2012;Corlett, 2016). Nevertheless, it is also well-understood that high precipitation and temperature seasonality as well as soil fertility variability, due to interactions with solar radiation, cloud cover, vapor pressure, frequency of wet days, growing degree days, frequency of frost days and many more interlinked climate factors, could occur in the most world's tropical regions (Bonal et al., 2016;Ali et al., 2020a;Bennett et al., 2021). Thus, any abrupt change (beyond the optimal ranges) in the several interconnected climate factors may also lead to soil degradation which in turn can lead to high soil compaction and drought conditions (Borchert, 1998;Lal, 2005). ...