Lerato Thakholi's research while affiliated with Wageningen University & Research and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we explore relations between race, capital and wildlife conservation in the town of Hoedspruit and its surroundings, which has developed into one of the main centres of the lucrative and rapidly growing 'wildlife economy' in South Africa. Behind its image as a shining 'green' example of wildlife-based development is a highly unequal...
Article
Full-text available
This paper argues that the conservation sector in South Africa is fossilized-unsustainable, outmoded and resistant to change-in two integrated ways. First, it is completely dependent on and steeped in fossil fuels and mineral extraction. The historical development of the South African economy's reliance on fossil and mineral resources provides the...
Article
Full-text available
In 2016, South Africa launched its National Biodiversity Economy Strategy. This strategy aims to facilitate the development of a ‘wildlife economy’ as a solution to unemployment, loss of biodiversity and rural development. Central to the strategy is the role of private conservation actors, who keenly posit their commercial model as the best way to...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation of biodiversity has increasingly been analyzed as biopolitical. That is, conservation initiatives such as breeding programs and protected areas seek to optimize some nonhuman life forms while exposing others to harm or degradation. Biopolitical conservation studies have looked at the implications of how human and non-human lives ha...
Article
Full-text available
Critical scholars have started analysing conservation as a ‘mode of production’, which entails conservation’s inclination to transform the value of nature into capital. This mode of production is underpinned by labour relations that have thus far escaped systematic analysis. To fill this gap, I use Smiths’ reading of the capitalist production of sp...

Citations

... The lifestyle in HWE and other estates, while masked under the veneer of sustainability is far more resource-intensive than the Mokoena and Bangu settlement. The infrastructure, frequent travel of residents, 20 high consumption lifestyles, dependency on coal-fired energy and many Sport utility vehicles (SUVs) arguably make wildlife estates the opposite of eco-friendly (Büscher et al., 2021). ...
... as entrenching apartheid legacies and racial inequities 3,4 , they support the claim that wildlife ranching results in more and better paid jobs than agricultural ranches. However, most of the studies cited as proof are based on self-reported data by wildlife ranch owners or managers 5,6 . ...
... Biodiversity offsets are generally operationalized through the creation or extension of private protected areas, often with ownership held by conservation organizations (Büscher 2021;Thakholi 2021). In Canada, Shell purchased about 18,200 hectares through several conservation organizations, including the Alberta Conservation Association, Ducks Unlimited Canada, and The Nature Conservancy Canada (Shell Canada 2019). ...
... Theory suggests there is a positive relationship between the diversity of elements in a system and its resilience 17 , where discriminatory apartheid era that ended in 1994 35 . Several authors argue that the wildlife ranching industry has entrenched these inequities [36][37][38] . Understanding the response of wildlife working lands in South Africa to a major shock thus requires nuanced consideration of their contributions to conservation and socio-economic development, which could improve policy design that seeks to find equitable, sustainable solutions to biodiversity loss. ...