Leon Moosavi's research while affiliated with University of Liverpool and other places

Publications (19)

Article
This article provides a theoretical evaluation of the author’s attempts at decolonising a sociology and social theory course in Singapore. It also introduces the notion of ‘decolonial reflexivity’ as a strategy for refining academic decolonisation. In doing so, this article seeks to overcome both the insufficient introspection about the potential f...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established within the field of Critical Whiteness Studies that white privilege routinely materialises in Western universities. Yet, even though a third wave of Critical Whiteness Studies is increasingly focussing on whiteness in non-Western contexts, there has been insufficient attention toward whether white privilege also exists in Eas...
Article
Full-text available
This article asks whether UK universities care about hedgehogs more than they care about people of colour. This absurd question is based on an analysis which shows that UK universities have had much greater engagement with the Hedgehog Friendly Campus initiative than the Race Equality Charter. A comparison with UK universities’ Athena Swan accredit...
Article
Full-text available
This article focuses on the stigmatisation of East Asian students within Western universities. This is necessary because East Asian students are often overlooked in existing literature about racism in Western academia. It is argued that East Asian students may be generalised as undesirable students in ways that resonate with more broadly held preju...
Article
Full-text available
Amidst the increasing calls for the decolonisation of universities, this article interrogates the representation of East Asian students in Western academia. It is argued that East Asian students are often imagined in Orientalist ways, as can be evidenced by evaluating the depiction of East Asian students in academic publications. More specifically,...
Article
In recent years, ‘intellectual decolonisation’ has become so popular in the Global North that we can now speak of there being a ‘decolonial bandwagon’. This article identifies some of the common limitations that can be found in this growing field of intellectual decolonisation. First and foremost, it is suggested that intellectual decolonisation in...
Article
Full-text available
Like the rest of the social sciences, criminology is dominated by Western scholars, literature and perspectives. This Westerncentrism of criminology means that non-Western criminological scholarship has largely been marginalised or ignored. This article contributes toward the ongoing efforts to decolonise criminology by arguing that the Malaysian i...
Article
Full-text available
Like all other social sciences, criminology is characterized by an ethnocentrism that often excludes non-Western scholarship. 'Asian criminology' and 'Southern criminology' are relatively new paradigms that seek to rectify this by problematizing criminological knowledge production and incorporating marginalized perspectives. Despite both projects s...
Article
Jamie Gilham and Ron Geaves , eds. Victorian Muslim: Abdullah Quilliam and Islam in the West. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 222. $39.95 (paper). - Volume 57 Issue 2 - Leon Moosavi
Chapter
Xenophobia is a tendency to distrust, dislike, or be frightened of people who are considered foreign, strange, or different. Etymologically the word stems from the ancient Greek xenos (stranger) and phobos (fear) and designates ?an irrational fear of strangers.? However, this literal understanding is not always expedient because xenophobia could ha...
Article
This article contributes towards understanding how Islamophobia manifests in the lives of Muslim converts in Britain. The significant relationship between Islamophobia and racialization is highlighted by arguing that before experiencing Islamophobia, 'white' converts to Islam are re-racialized as 'not-quite-white', or even 'non-white', because of a...
Conference Paper
Muslims in Britain encounter Islamophobia in politics, news media and everyday encounters. Since Muslims in Britain are racialised as non-white, the Islamophobia they face often simultaneously merges with racism. In this paper, I consider the effect that the pervasiveness of Islamophobia has on Muslims in Britain. I will argue that Muslims in Brita...
Article
This paper explores how the whiteness of converts to Islam affects their post-conversion experiences. It shows how white converts are privileged because their whiteness functions as a marker of dominance and respectability. In attempting to go beyond well-established observations about the existence of white privilege, the limits of white privilege...
Article
In the decade following 9/11, numerous studies have confirmed that anti-Muslim prejudice, commonly referred to as Islamophobia, has become a prominent feature of many societies. As a result, Muslims have been demonised and subjected to discrimination in various ways. While the role of sensationalist media and Far Right groups in perpetuating Islamo...

Citations

... The following points concerning British academia will illustrate my point. In the first place, British academia has done a poor job of fighting racism and the attached "racially toxic academic culture", leading some scholars to argue that British universities care more about hedgehogs than people of colour (Moosavi 2021). For example, 0.7% of professors and 0.9% of other senior academics in British universities in 2019/20 were black, demonstrating the lack of concern for the race gap (Adams 2020). ...
... She shared an example of racism: 'when you take an exam in class, the TAs make a point to stare at you'. Feifei is describing a newly emerging cultural stereotype of academic dishonesty targeting Chinese international students (Moosavi 2021). More recently, many scientists of Chinese and Asian descent reported they had been suspected by the theft of intellectual property, economic espionage, hacking, and trade-secret theft (Lee and Li 2021). ...
... While the glorification of fair skin in East Asia predates colonialism, it was in the colonial period that the contemporary understanding of whiteness in East Asia was cemented. In the academic domain, this colonial-era racism still materialises as a mantra that implies that white people are best equipped to produce and convey knowledge due to supposedly being superior in creativity, innovation and critical thinking, which has not only privileged white scholars, but has also devalued the intellectual contributions of scholars of colour in the past and the present (Go 2020;Moosavi 2020). What is most significant to note here is that tenets of white supremacy appear to have been subscribed to by a significant number of East Asians. ...
... In recent years, scholarship on the decolonization of education (Moosavi, 2020;Motala et al., 2021;Shahjahan, 2011), social justice in educational leadership (Chance, 2021;Johnson & Fournillier, 2021;Lopez, 2015;Sarid, 2021;Trujillo et al., 2021;Wang, 2018) and the decolonization of policy and leadership (Cukier et al., 2021;Cummins, 2020;Lopez, 2021;Moorosi, 2021) have proliferated. However, those publications do not adequately explain the relationship between policy and leadership. ...
... In recent decades, social scientists have discussed the need to decolonize scientific knowledge. A growing number of scholars contend that criminology can only progress by democratizing knowledge creation (Carrington et al., 2016;Moosavi, 2019). They encourage an end to the misconception that theories developed in the Global North are more robust, objective and generalizable than theories developed elsewhere. ...
... Also, the criminological problems of the South Asian region are unique and regional in nature, which will not be understood by other regions of Asia or the Asia-Pacific. I am not going to reiterate on decolonizing criminology, as it is heavily discussed (Moosavi, 2018a), but would be wary if Southern and Asian criminologies would colonize South Asian criminology. ...
... In recent times, studies of racism against immigrants have attempted to move away from the presumed dichotomy between whites and "Others" (Moosavi 2015;Selod 2015;Karaman and Christian 2020). Such studies attempt to look beyond skin colour and focus on class or religion to explore "cultural racism" (Giroux 1993;Wren 2001) or the "new racism" (Werbner 2005;Van Dijk 2000). ...
... Race intersects with Muslimness in complex ways, and there is often an expectation that Muslims are exclusively brown and black people. A study by Moosavi (2015) shows that upon converting to Islam, white Muslims become perceived by other white people as brown/ black and can therefore lose some of the privileges their whiteness would normally afford them. Similarly, a US study by Maghbouleh (2017) shows that although Iranian-Americans are categorized as white by the US government, they are nonetheless subject to racism because White (European) Americans associate their Iranianness with brownness and Muslimness. ...
... Other studies suggest that Muslim women's clothing is viewed by Westerners as opposing mainstream culture (Donnell, 2003). In the same vein, Moosavi (2015) claims that "Orientalism" is still alive and kicking with regard to Islamophobia in the representations of Islam and Muslims by the British government. It is apparent, some claim, that the British newspapers practice clear (mis)representation of Islam in their work (Richardson, 2004). ...