Leon Gordenker's research while affiliated with Princeton University and other places

Publications (28)

Chapter
The structure and some of the most important procedures of the United Nations are set forth in its Charter (For full text, see Appendix, p. 159). This constitutional document, approved by the San Francisco Conference, has remained formally unchanged, except for the enlargement of the Security Council and the Economic and Social Council. It provides...
Chapter
The contemporary concern for human rights is inextricably linked to their violation by the German National Socialists as well as the weak reaction from abroad from 1933 until their defeat in World War II. The inhumanity of the Nazis and their allies, including the Italian Fascists before the war, culminated in an explicit program to exterminate Jew...
Chapter
As the world changes, so does the United Nations. As the 21st century opened, the United Nations had experienced a brief euphoric period when in the Iraq war of 1991 collective security appeared to work for the first time as planned. An active new Secretary-General had offered apparently acceptable prescriptions for strengthening the UN capacity to...
Chapter
In the almost 60 years of its existence, membership of the United Nations has more than tripled. In 1945, at its founding, the organization had 51 members. By 2004, membership had grown to 191 and is now almost universal. Since the 1960s, African and Asian states have occupied a dominant numerical position, as Table 3.1 shows.
Chapter
Two principal direct approaches to the maintenance of international peace and security, the fundamental purpose of the United Nations, are set out in the UN Charter.
Chapter
Far more time, effort and money in the UN system go into cooperation to promote economic and social progress than into any other endeavor. More than 80 percent of the personnel of the global agencies, including the United Nations itself, work on issues concerning a higher level of general welfare for the world’s people. A huge list of programs cove...
Chapter
Most of the present members of the United Nations are former colonies that gained political independence through direct or indirect involvement of the United Nations. In 1945, more than 750 million people lived in non-self-governing territories of various kinds: by 1990, after Namibia gained its independence in a world that had undergone rapid grow...
Chapter
As the world changes, so does the United Nations. At the start of the last decade of the twentieth century, the United Nations was experiencing a revival both in use and in general appreciation.
Chapter
The fundamental purpose of the United Nations is the maintenance of international peace and security. The Charter of the United Nations sets out two principal, direct approaches to maintaining peace.
Chapter
The structure and some of the most important procedures of the United Nations are set forth in its Charter (for the full text see the Appendix). This constitutional document emerged from the San Francisco Conference and has remained formally unchanged, except for the enlargement of the Security Council and the Economic and Social Council. It provid...
Chapter
In the UN system, far more time, effort and money go into cooperation to promote economic and social progress than into any other endeavour. More than 80 per cent of the personnel of the global agencies, including the United Nations itself, work on issues concerning a higher level of general welfare for the world’s people. A huge list of programmes...
Chapter
The contemporary concern for human rights is inextricably linked to the crimes against humanity by the German National Socialist government in the period 1933–45 and the insufficient reaction from abroad. The initial inhumanity of the Nazis, as well as of the Italian Fascists before the war, culminated in an explicit programme to exterminate Jews,...
Chapter
In the 45 years of its existence, membership of the United Nations has more than tripled. In 1945, at its founding, the organization had 51 mem­bers. By 1992, membership had grown to 178 and is now almost universal. Since the sixties, African and Asian states have occupied a dominant numerical position, as Table 3.1 shows.
Chapter
The structure and some of the most important procedures of the United Nations are set forth in its Charter (for the full text see the Appendix). This constitutional document emerged from the San Francisco Conference and has remained formally unchanged, except for the enlargement of the Security Council and the Economic and Social Council. It provid...
Chapter
In the first forty-five years of its existence, membership of the United Nations more than tripled. In 1945, at its founding, the organization had fifty-one members. By 1991, membership had grown to 166 and is now almost universal. Since the 1960s, African and Asian states have occupied a dominant numerical position, as Table 3.1 shows.
Chapter
Far more time, effort and money in the UN system go into cooperation to promote economic and social progress than into any other endeavour. More than 80 per cent of the personnel of the global agencies, including the United Nations itself, work on issues concerning a higher level of general welfare for the world’s people. A huge list of programmes...
Chapter
The contemporary concern for human rights is inextricably linked to the crimes against humanity by the German National Socialist government in the period 1933–45 and the insufficient reaction from abroad. The initial inhumanity of the Nazis, as well as of the Italian Fascists before the war, culminated in an explicit programme to exterminate Jews,...
Chapter
As the world changes, so does the United Nations. At the start of the last decade of the twentieth century, the United Nations was experiencing a revival both in use and in general appreciation.
Chapter
The fundamental purpose of the United Nations is the maintenance of international peace and security. The Charter of the United Nations sets out two principal, direct approaches to maintaining peace.
Chapter
Most of the present members of the United Nations are former colonies that gained political independence through direct or indirect involvement of the United Nations. In 1945, more than 750 million people lived in non-self-governing territories of various kinds; by 1990, after Namibia gained its independence in a world that had undergone rapid grow...

Citations

... Meijer, Peschar, & Scheerens, 1995;Ministerie van Onderwijs, Cultuur en Wetenschappen, 2000), it was also in line with new developments recommended by international organizations such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1986) and UNESCO (1988UNESCO ( , 1990, which had already taken place in the early 1980s in countries such as the United States (Crockett & Kauffman, 1999), Italy (Fillipini-Gaudiano, 1991), Australia and New Zeeland (Forlin & Forlin, 1996, 1998a, 1998b. According to a number of international conventions (e.g., Rights of the Child; United Nations, 1989), placement of children in (separate) special education schools began to be viewed as an infringement on the right to equal educational opportunities (Alston, Parker, & Seymour, 1992;Baehr & Gordenker, 1992). ...
... Chapter VII allows for coercion (force) to be used if there exists "any threat to peace, breach of peace, or act of aggression," in order to "restore international peace and security." 9 These two chapters of the UN Charter serve as the foundation for UN peacekeeping operations. ...
... One could not develop his or her potentialities in the place of danger and uncertainties. In short, the political instability will lead to the destruction of the international agreed values, standards or rules regulating the conducts of states towards their own citizens and towards the noncitizens known as human rights [31]. Without answering these seven threats above, then everything will turn to the last which is the global insecurity. ...
... erthan-usual risk of experiencing a certain event over a longer period of time. Past forecasting attempts in the social sciences. for both early warning and risk assessment, include models for international conflict (Choucri and Robinson. 1978; Singer and WaIIace. 1979; Bueno de Mesquita, 1981; Ward et aI., 2007), refugee movements (Gordenker. 1986Gordenker. , 1992), complex humanitarian emergencies (Harff and Gurr. 1998), genocides and politicides (Fein, 1992; Harff. 1998 Harff. ,2003), ethnic conflict (Gurr and Moore, 1997). state failure (Goldstone et al.. 2000Goldstone et al.. . 2005 King and Langche. 2001). general political instability (Bond et aI., 1997), civil conflict (Ward and Bakke, 200 ...
... Non-permanent members of the Security Council are elected for two-year terms, with five members being replaced every year. Representation has traditionally been determined by regional affiliation: of the non-permanent members, three are usually from Africa, two from Asia, one from Eastern Europe, two from Latin America, and two from Western Europe and other states – Australia, Canada and New Zealand (Baehr and Gordenker, 1999: 25). Patterns of representation for non-permanent members have also been discussed intensively in the framework of several recent proposals for Security Council reform. ...