Leithen K. M'Gonigle's research while affiliated with Simon Fraser University and other places

Publications (47)

Article
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Mounting evidence suggests that climate change, agricultural intensification and disease are impacting bumblebee health and contributing to species’ declines. Identifying how these factors impact insect communities at large spatial and temporal scales is difficult, partly because species may respond in different ways. Further, the necessary data mu...
Article
1. Historical museum records provide potentially useful data for identifying drivers of change in species occupancy. However, because museum records are typically obtained via many collection methods, methodological developments are needed in order to enable robust inferences. Occupancy‐detection models, a relatively new and powerful suite of stati...
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Speciation is less likely to occur when there is gene flow between nascent species. Natural selection can oppose gene flow and promote speciation if there is variation in ecological conditions among the nascent species' locations. Previous theory on ecological speciation with gene flow has focused primarily on the role of genetic variation in ecolo...
Article
Farmland diversification practices are sometimes considered a win-win for agriculture and biodiversity, but most studies rely on species richness, diversity, or abundance as a proxy for habitat quality. Biodiversity assessments may miss early clues that populations are imperiled when species presence does not imply persistence. In contrast, physiol...
Preprint
Historical museum records provide potentially useful data for identifying drivers of change in species occupancy. However, because museum records are typically obtained via many collection methods, methodological developments are needed in order to enable robust inferences. Occupancy-detection models, a relatively new and powerful suite of methods,...
Article
Full-text available
Capture–mark–recapture (CMR) studies have been used extensively in ecology and evolution. While it is feasible to apply CMR in some animals, it is considerably more challenging in small fast‐moving species such as insects. In these groups, low recapture rates can bias estimates of demographic parameters, thereby handicapping effective analysis and...
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Metabolic rate underlies a wide range of phenomena from cellular dynamics to ecosystem structure and function. Models seeking to statistically explain variation in metabolic rate across vertebrates are largely based on body size and temperature. Unexpectedly, these models overlook variation in the size of gills and lungs that acquire the oxygen nee...
Article
Bumble bees are globally important pollinators, especially in temperate regions, and evidence suggests that many species are declining. One recent high profile study by Soroye et al. (2020) applied occupancy models to dated historical collection data to quantify declines across North America and Europe. The authors modelled 66 species across a set...
Article
The social environment can affect development and fitness. However, we do not know how selection acts on individuals that cue developmental pathways using features of the social environment. Socially cued anticipatory plasticity (SCAP) is a hypothetical strategy whereby juveniles use social cues to alter development to match their adult phenotype t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Capture-mark-recapture (CMR) studies have been used extensively in ecology and evolution. While it is feasible to apply CMR in some animals, it is considerably more challenging in small fast-moving species such as insects. In these groups, low recapture rates can bias estimates of demographic parameters, thereby, handicapping effective management o...
Preprint
Full-text available
A challenge in conservation is the gap between knowledge generated by researchers and the information being used to inform conservation practice. This gap, widely known as the research-implementation gap, can limit the effectiveness of conservation practice. One way to address this is to design conservation tools that are easy for practitioners to...
Article
Disruptive natural selection within populations exploiting different resources is considered to be a major driver of adaptive radiation and the production of biodiversity. Fitness functions, which describe the relationships between trait variation and fitness, can help to illuminate how this disruptive selection leads to population differentiation....
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Disconnected habitat fragments are poor at supporting population and community persistence; restoration ecologists, therefore, advocate for the establishment of habitat networks across landscapes. Few empirical studies, however, have considered how networks of restored habitat patches affect metacommunity dynamics. Here, using a 10‐year study on re...
Article
The distribution of resources in space has important consequences for the evolution of dispersal‐related traits. Dispersal moderates patterns of gene flow and, consequently, the potential for local adaptation to spatially differentiated resource types. We lack both models and experiments that evaluate how dispersal evolves in landscapes with multip...
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Intensive agriculture reduces wild pollinator abundance, diversity and pollination services, while depending critically on wild pollinators for crop pollination. Floral enhancements such as hedgerows (native, perennial flowering trees and shrubs) can enhance pollinator colonization, persistence, occupancy, and species richness within intensive agri...
Article
The spatial distribution of prospective mates can dramatically affect the process and outcome of mate choice. In a variety of species, spacing between males influences the likelihood that females visit particular individuals or respond to competing signals. Discrimination by females is expected to be highest among neighbouring males, yet males of s...
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One of the major challenges in evolutionary ecology is to understand how coevolution shapes species interaction networks. Important topological properties of networks such as nestedness and modularity are thought to be affected by coevolution. However, there has been no test whether coevolution does, in fact, lead to predictable network structure....
Article
Land-use change and climate change are driving a global biodiversity crisis. Yet, how species' responses to climate change are correlated with their responses to land-use change is poorly understood. Here, we assess the linkages between climate and land-use change on birds in Neotropical forest and agriculture. Across > 300 species, we show that af...
Article
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Native pollinators and, particularly bees, are a critical component of agricultural systems. Unfortunately, many factors are leading to their declines, including habitat loss. Consequently, approaches have emerged that aim to restore pollinator habitat in managed landscapes. A widely adopted technique in Europe and North America is the planting of...
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Nature Communications 6: Article number: 741410.1038/ncomms8414 (2015); Published: June162015; Updated: February182016. The authors inadvertently omitted Kimiora L. Ward, who managed and contributed data, from the author list. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
Article
Fire has a major impact on the structure and function of many ecosystems globally. Pyrodiversity, the diversity of fires within a region (where diversity is based on fire characteristics such as extent, severity, and frequency), has been hypothesized to promote biodiversity, but changing climate and land management practices have eroded pyrodiversi...
Article
To slow the rate of global species loss, it is imperative to understand how to restore and maintain native biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. Currently, agriculture is associated with lower spatial heterogeneity and turnover in community composition (β-diversity). While some techniques are known to enhance α-diversity, it is unclear whether h...
Article
Widespread evidence of pollinator declines has led to policies supporting habitat restoration including in agricultural landscapes. Yet, little is yet known about the effectiveness of these restoration techniques for promoting stable populations and communities of pollinators, especially in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. Introducing f...
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There is compelling evidence that more diverse ecosystems deliver greater benefits to people, and these ecosystem services have become a key argument for biodiversity conservation. However, it is unclear how much biodiversity is needed to deliver ecosystem services in a cost-effective way. Here we show that, while the contribution of wild bees to c...
Article
Agriculture now constitutes 40–50% of terrestrial land use globally. By enhancing habitat suitability and connectivity, restoration within agricultural landscapes could have a major influence on biodiversity conservation. However, habitat management within intensive agricultural landscapes may primarily boost abundances of common, highly mobile gen...
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Agriculture today places great strains on biodiversity, soils, water and the atmosphere, and these strains will be exacerbated if current trends in population growth, meat and energy consumption, and food waste continue. Thus, farming systems that are both highly productive and minimize environmental harms are critically needed. How organic agricul...
Article
Studies of landscape effects on assemblages and distribution of insects are relatively uncommon, largely because of the lack of occurrence data that span broad spatial or temporal scales. Here, we provide a multi-species analysis using generalized linear mixed models to examine the effects of local and regional variables on richness and occurrence...
Conference Paper
Agriculture has become increasingly reliant on pollinator-dependent crops, but pollinators ar threatened by land-use change, habitat fragmentation, pesticide use, and invasions of non-native plants and animals. As a result, there is increasing need for management practices that restore pollinators and the services they provide in working landscapes...
Article
Some species mate non-randomly with respect to alleles underlying immunity. One hypothesis proposes that this is advantageous because non-random mating can lead to offspring with superior parasite resistance. We investigate this hypothesis, generalizing previous models in four ways: First, rather than only examine invasibility of modifiers of non-r...
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Habitat conversion is the primary driver of biodiversity loss, yet little is known about how it is restructuring the tree of life by favoring some lineages over others. We combined a complete avian phylogeny with 12 years of Costa Rican bird surveys (118,127 detections across 487 species) sampled in three land uses: forest reserves, diversified agr...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Massive amounts of ecological data are becoming available through large digitization collaborative projects. These data come from disparate sources with varied methodological biases and yet present the opportunity to address ecological questions at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. Large scale anthropogenic pert...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Many recent studies have shown that enhancing floral resources in intensive agricultural landscapes promotes species richness of flower-visitor communities, but to date, it is not known whether such effects are transient, merely concentrating individuals from across the larger landscape at flower-rich patches. Long-ter...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods One of the major challenges for evolutionary biology is to understand how species coevolve and shape complex networks of interacting species. Several topological features of networks, including the nestedness, modularity and phylogenetic structure of interactions are believed to be affected by coevolution, but there ha...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Agriculture now constitutes 40-50% of terrestrial land use and thus, restoration within agricultural landscapes, by affecting habitat suitability, matrix properties, and connectivity for vulnerable species, could have a major influence on biodiversity conservation. Some work, however, suggests that habitat management w...
Article
Explaining patterns of diversity has long been a central focus in ecology. One of the most challenging problems has been to understand how species occupying similar ecological niches can co-exist because, with limited resources, demographic stochasticity is expected to lead to the eventual extinction of all but one of them. The Allee effect has bee...
Article
Increases in water demand, urbanization, and severity of drought threaten freshwater ecosystems of the arid western United States. Historical assessments of change in assemblages over time can help determine the effects of these stressors but, to date, are rare. In the present study, we resurveyed 45 sites originally sampled in 1914–1915 for Odonat...
Article
By constantly selecting for novel genotypes, coevolution between hosts and parasites can favour elevated mutation rates. Models of this process typically assume random encounters. However, offspring are often more likely to encounter their mother's parasites. Because parents and offspring are genetically similar, they may be susceptible to the same...
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Empirical data indicate that sexual preferences are critical for maintaining species boundaries, yet theoretical work has suggested that, on their own, they can have only a minimal role in maintaining biodiversity. This is because long-term coexistence within overlapping ranges is thought to be unlikely in the absence of ecological differentiation....
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Levels of parasitism are continuously distributed in nature. Models of host-parasite coevolution, however, typically assume that species can be easily characterized as either parasitic or non-parasitic. Consequently, it is poorly understood which factors influence the evolution of parasitism itself. We investigate how ploidy level and the genetic m...
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Parasites can strongly affect the evolution of their hosts, but their effects on host diversification are less clear. In theory, contrasting parasite communities in different foraging habitats could generate divergent selection on hosts and promote ecological speciation. Immune systems are costly to maintain, adaptable, and an important component o...
Article
The spatial genetic composition of hybrid zones exhibits a range of possible patterns, with many characterized by patchy distributions. While several hypothetical explanations exist for the maintenance of these "mosaic" hybrid zones, they remain virtually unexplored theoretically. Using computer simulations we investigate the roles of dispersal and...
Article
The rate at which mutations occur in nature is itself under natural selection. While a general reduction of mutation rates is advantageous for species inhabiting constant environments, higher mutation rates can be advantageous for those inhabiting fluctuating environments that impose on-going directional selection. Analogously, species involved in...
Article
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For a general theory of adaptation, it is essential to know the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations. Recent theoretical and empirical studies have made considerable progress in determining the characteristics of this distribution. To date, the experiments have largely verified the theoretical predictions. Despite the fact that t...

Citations

... Understanding patterns of phenological change in Bombus' North American distribution, and why certain species are more susceptible to climate change-related extinction risks, is a critical knowledge gap. While Bombus providecrucial pollination services, many face decline (Jackson et al., 2022). Bombus have exhibited large-scale range responses to climate, with population extinction risks rising in areas where species are near their upper thermal limits (Soroye et al., 2020). ...
... While occupancy models are typically applied to the presence/absence data, recent studies have shown that their application to presence-only data is possible [10,[26][27][28][29]. In addition, multi-species occupancy models that account for species' expected ranges have been shown to be relatively effective at estimating species-specific trends over large timescales [10,30]. Here, we apply occupancy models to a large bumblebee dataset to identify temporal drivers of change over the last century in North America. ...
... Another inference is that the effects of transgenerational epigenetics on the evolutionary dynamics of populations might be more important than previously envisaged because they multiply within single genotypes. Epigenetic variation could speed up or slow down genetic adaptation depending on whether genetic and epigenetic alleles overlap in their adaptive phenotypic values [14]. More outcomes will be revealed by exploring new critical questions in this field: (i) how does subindividual variation with epigenetic transgenerational transmission affect genetic adaptation? ...
... Several factors govern the rate at which oxygen can be extracted from the water, the most important ones being gill surface area, the rate at which the gills are ventilated and patterns of gill perfusion (e.g. Bigman et al., 2021;Randall, 1982;Rubalcaba et al., 2020). Our results point to additional factors controlling the rate of oxygen extraction in a size and temperature-dependent manner, such as the boundary layer at the gill epithelium. ...
... The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List has assessed that 16.5% of total vertebrate pollinators, which increases to 30% for island species, 9% of bees and butterfly species are either on the verge of extinction or at risk in Europe (IUCN, 2019;M€ unsch et al., 2019;Poniatowski et al., 2018). Soroye et al. (2020) and Guzman et al. (2021) have reported that more than 40% and 15% of bumble bee species (Bombus confuses, (Schenck, 1859), B. cullumanus, (Kirby, 1802), B. subterraneus (Linnaeus, 1758)) occupancy has declined over the 15 years in North America and Europe due to the consequences of the climate change event. Major categories of crops i.e. fruit and vegetables (fi50 billion) and edible oilseed crops (fi39 billion) would be drastically affected by the deterioration of the numbers of pollinators (M€ unsch et al., 2019;Qi et al., 2020). ...
... Even so, the developmental system perspective remains fundamentally different from these approaches because it attributes genetic activity an equal footing with the many other causal factors that interactively affect the developmental and evolutionary process of phenotypes [9,22,38] ( Figure 1B). The two different perspectives thus undoubtedly differ in their predictions about how eco-evolutionary population dynamics unfold (e.g., [34,39,40]). [57], or information-based model [57], proposes that external cues (such as temperature or crowding) in early life trigger phenotypic responses that improve fitness at a later stage of development. This well-studied type of developmental plasticity is also referred to as 'active' developmental plasticity [58] and has strong support in invertebrates and a few short-lived vertebrates [48]. ...
... Simpson, 1944, later described phenotypic evolution of populations through time on a rugged landscape, in which isolated clusters of fitness peaks represent 'adaptive zones' relative to adjacent regions of low fitness (Kauffman and Levin, 1987). Lande and Arnold formalized the analysis of selection and estimation of phenotypic fitness landscapes (Lande and Arnold, 1983;Arnold et al., 2001;Arnold, 2003), leading to empirical studies of fitness landscapes in numerous systems (Schluter and Grant, 1984;Schluter, 1988;Hendry et al., 2009;Beausoleil et al., 2019;Benkman, 2003;Martin and Wainwright, 2013a;Martin and Gould, 2020). Fitness surfaces are also central components of speciation models and theory (Gavrilets, 2004;Turelli et al., 2001;Servedio and Boughman, 2017). ...
... Field border plantings are considered a cost-effective conservation strategy (Morandin et al., 2016) that can provide continuous floral resources for bees in the otherwise forage limited monocultural landscapes while also increasing crop pollination and crop yield (Boyle et al., 2020;Garibaldi et al., 2014). In fact, these border plantings are known to support higher bee species richness than crop fields (Sardiñas and Kremen, 2015), improve long-term population dynamics Ponisio et al., 2019), and decrease parasite presence (Cohen et al., 2021). Recent evidence, however, suggests that both cultivated, bee-attractive and uncultivated (i.e., weedy) border plants harbor pesticides that have been applied to crops David et al., 2016;Long and Krupke, 2016) and may be a source of pesticide exposure for honey bees and wild bees. ...
... Dispersal traits are expected to evolve as a consequence of species escaping competition or evading disturbance events, thus enhancing species survival and persistence at regional scales (Duputié and Massol, 2013). Conversely, it could be expected that the benefit of dispersal abilities decreases as species locally adapt and face an increased cost of dispersal, such as in the case with increased landscape fragmentation (Cenzer and M'Gonigle, 2019). To illustrate this, Dini-Andreote et al. (2018) investigated microbial adaptative traits along a gradient of saltmarsh formation. ...
... To address this challenge, a number of "distanceweighted" methods have been proposed. These approaches continuously weight landscape variables based on their distance from the study sites with areas closer to the response variable having greater weight than those further away (Aue et al. 2012;Williams et al. 2012;Karp et al. 2016;Chandler and Hepinstall-Cymerman 2016;Miguet et al. 2017;Kremen et al. 2018) (Fig. 1c, d). This requires using a weighting function (usually a Gaussian or exponential decay function) to weight landscape predictors in a model. ...