Laÿna Droz's research while affiliated with BC3-Basque Centre for Climate Change and other places

Publications (11)

Preprint
Recent research about the microbiome points to a picture in which we, humans, are living through nature, and nature itself is living in us. Our bodies are hosting – and depend on – the multiple species that constitute human microbiota. This article will discuss current research on the microbiome through the ideas of Japanese ecologist Imanishi Kinj...
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This article sheds light on the diversity of meanings and connotations that tend to be lost or hidden in translations between different conceptualizations of nature in East and South-East Asia. It reviews the idea of “nature” in Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Filipino, Tagalog, Cebuano, Lumad, Indonesian, Burmese, Nepali, Khmer, and Mongolian. It s...
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Green Criminology in Asia: A Platform for Dialogue Across Disciplines and Languages Many different languages and disciplines are involved in Asian research on environmental conflicts. Linguistic diversity combined with the varied economic, legal, political and social contexts of the Asian continent gives birth to myriad debates about environmental...
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This article approaches the challenges of the distribution of responsibility for climate change on a local level using the framework of the milieu. It suggests that the framework of the milieu, inspired by Japanese and cross-cultural environmental philosophy, provides pathways to address the four challenges of climate change (global dispersion, fra...
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To save nature, environmental activists in Taiwan and Japan are willing to change their behavior and society itself, challenging “harmony” in their communities. This paper explores the tension between globally relevant environmental activism and localized cultural traditions. A wide-encompassing understanding of environmental activism is proposed,...
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Non-technical summary The sustainability concept seeks to balance how present and future generations of humans meet their needs. But because nature is viewed only as a resource, sustainability fails to recognize that humans and other living beings depend on each other for their well-being. We therefore argue that true sustainability can only be ach...
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Approaching sustainability through landscapes helps appreciate the value of the diversity of human ways to live with nature that exists today. On the basis of fieldwork research in Japan, we explore the landscapes of natural parks, satoyama, and permaculture, all three recognized as sustainable and of high biodiversity value despite showing signifi...
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The sustainability concept in its current form suffers from reductionism. The common interpretation of “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” fails to explicitly recognize their interdependence with needs of current and future non-human generations. Here we argue that the fo...
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Climate change and many environmental problems are caused by the accumulated effects of repeated actions by multiple individuals. Instead of relying on collective responsibility, I argue for a non-atomistic individual responsibility towards such environmental problems, encompassing omissions, ways of life, and consequences mediated by other agents....
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“Sustainability” is widely used by diverse organizations as the normative direction to coordinate common actions. But what should we sustain or maintain? Through philosophical reasoning and a literature review in environmental ethics, this paper explores this question and develops a working definition of “sustainability” that intends to be compatib...

Citations

... Research on responsibility ranges from theoretical deliberation on principles of attribution of responsibility (Graafland, 2003;Hedlund, 2012;Neuhäuser, 2014;Gunnemyr, 2020) to empirical studies on distribution of responsibility in specific issues such as climate change (Droz, 2021;, biotechnology (Danaher, 2016), or agriculture (Doorn et al., 2011), at global (Moelle, 2017), regional (Karageorgiou, 2019), or national (Alcaniz and Hellwig, 2011) level. This study deals with distribution of forward-looking responsibility in the ongoing policy process on AI in the EU. ...
... It came to take other meanings, such as the whole of human society, the human and real world, as well as meanings similar to the English "the world of", namely referring to a specific group or people. The term fūdo 風土, sometimes translated as "milieu" (Droz, 2021), also refers to the local specificities of a land including the mutual influences between the landscape, the climatic conditions, the groups of beings-including humans-living there, as well as the sociocultural elements. ...
... Any institution or organization, such as states, governments or private companies, is composed of individual decision-makers who are situated within the webs of their milieu and taking decisions through the decision-making rules of their organizations. The account of individual responsibility for environmental harm applies to government officials or private company executive officers, who will have a higher degree of contributory and capacity responsibility for environmental harm than a lambda citizen with very little sociopolitical and economic power [65]. For example, in contrast with the executives of fossil fuel companies who have a very high degree of contributory and capacity responsibility for harm induced by climate change, the individual car owner who consumes and relies on the work of these companies has a lesser degree of responsibility for this harm, but nevertheless retains a degree of individual responsibility to opt out from unsustainable practices and engage in reparative actions such as boycotting these fossil fuels companies and use political and legal tools to hold them accountable and change the social structure. ...
... Human relationships with the environment have been guided by the pervasive mindset in which human traits, such as rationality and autonomy, make humans exceptional and superior to nature (Drichel, 2019). In this way, human exceptionalism postulated human superiority over nature and justified the use of nonhuman nature as a resource for human use (Rupprecht et al., 2020). However, human exceptionalist assumptions have been linked to unsustainability (Rupprecht et al., 2020) by disintegrating humans from the other natural beings and ecological processes, which will be referred to as nonhumans hereafter. ...
... We did not do an NFF analysis of the SDGs but close inspection of the SDG targets informed us that there is much focus on Nature for People and a bit on Nature for Nature but very little on Nature as Culture value perspectives. We note, for example, that landscapes are not represented in the SDGs, let alone biocultural landscapes (Chakroun and Droz 2020;Hanspach et al. 2020). Zheng et al. (2021) recently highlighted a general under-appreciation of culture in the Agenda 2030. ...
... We want to contribute to further theoretical development in the area of sustainability communication by asking the question: Do learning processes include the development of something that can be described as sustainability agency [4]? Sustainability agency is as something that is realized in individual interactions and communication; sustainability agency is always directed towards improving the lives of others [54,55]-in a socio-environmental dimension. Then, we would be able to further conceptualize social learning for sustainability. ...
... This calls for systems based on representations of and experimentations around continuously renegotiating complex, entangled multispecies interests. Such systems rely on and respect multispecies agency, and aim to provide to all species the operational autonomy necessary to meet their needs (Droz, 2019). Many best practices have been developed by Indigenous peoples and are part of traditional ecological knowledge systems. ...