Laurence Matte Guilmain's research while affiliated with Université du Québec à Montréal and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Canada has no legislation prohibiting forced labour, relying instead on human trafficking penal dispositions; the two are intimately related. However, there has only been one conviction for human trafficking for the purposes of forced labour. Here, we offer an analysis of jurisprudence according to a model of labour trafficking focusing on the inte...
Article
Full-text available
The spectrum of employment-related geographical mobility ranges from hours-long daily commutes to journeys that take workers away from home for an extended period of time. Although distance and travel conditions vary, there is a strong consensus within existing literature that mobility has physical, psychological, and social repercussions. However,...

Citations

... The author suggests that instead of criminalizing Zimbabwean workers, South Africa should draw from existing migrant labour policy regimes and should negotiate a permit-based system to facilitate transnational agricultural labour in order to reduce agricultural workers' exposure to abuse. Second, Matte Guilmain and Hanley's (2020) contribution maps the legal recourses that can be undertaken in cases of forced labour. The article focuses primarily on recourses for migrant workers who are structurally more vulnerable as a result of the legal constraints produced by the various migratory schemas through which they may access employment opportunities in Canada. ...
... An important dimension that determines age-sex distribution of labor force is health: thereby, making health promotion important in human resource development (Fu et al., 2019;Aisa & Pueyo, 2013). Health care facilities including child and maternity care along with appropriate timings, enhancing women's enthusiasm and competitiveness, parity in pay and other working conditions, retirements, and equitable treatments in case of promotions, duties and responsibilities, geographical mobility, commuting hours, etc. are crucial to raise female employment (Gesualdi-Fecteau & Guilmain, 2019;Sasongko et al., 2019;Gambaro et al., 2019;Lozano & Renteria, 2019;AlAzzawia & Hlasny, 2019;Li & Vidyattama, 2019;Buyse et al., 2013;Michaelis & Debus, 2011). Parallel to these are the considerations specific to women such as motherhood timings, family building, mommy track experience, fertility shocks, husband's migration or job loss, low pay segment (gender wage gap) as stated by Miller (2011) (2003). ...