Lauren L Saling's research while affiliated with RMIT University and other places

Publications (12)

Conference Paper
Full-text available
Where do queries-the words searchers type into a search box-come from? The Information Retrieval community understands the performance of queries and search engines extensively, and has recently begun to examine the impact of query variation, showing that different queries for the same information need produce different results. In an information e...
Article
Full-text available
Like other disease outbreaks, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid generation and dissemination of misinformation and fake news. We investigated whether subscribers to a fact checking newsletter (n = 1397) were willing to share possible misinformation, and whether predictors of possible misinformation sharing are the same as for general sampl...
Article
Full-text available
People who judge that a wrongdoer’s behaviour is determined are disposed, in certain cases, to judge that the wrongdoer cannot be responsible for his behaviour. Some try to explain this phenomenon by arguing that people are intuitive incompatibilists about determinism and moral responsibility. However, Peter Strawson argues that we excuse determine...
Article
Full-text available
Social distancing measures have been implemented in many countries to limit the spread of COVID-19. Emerging literature reveals that fear of acquiring COVID-19 has detrimental psychological ramifications. However, it seems likely that social distancing will have a further negative impact on well-being. The focus of this study was therefore to inves...
Article
Facebook is a ubiquitous platform for self-disclosure; however, norms associated with online and offline disclosure appear to differ. The present study investigated whether people's disposition to disclose and comfort with others’ disclosures of negatively-valenced content differs online and offline. Additionally, psychological predictors of offlin...
Article
Full-text available
When young adults re-tell a story, they naturally produce more concise but sufficiently informative narratives. The repeated narratives of elderly adults, on the other hand, tend towards prolixity. In the present study, participants were explicitly instructed to re-tell a story in a more succinct (but informative format) to investigate whether they...
Article
When older adults retell an impersonal story, the resulting narratives are typically characterized by more prolixity and less coherence than those produced by younger adults. We aimed to determine whether this pattern is also observed when retelling a personal narrative. Younger and older participants told a personal story three consecutive times....
Article
Night-time mobile phone use has the potential to detract from sleep quality and continuity, resulting in tiredness and impaired psychological function. An on-line survey of the mobile phone habits of 397 adults (M age = 34.45, SD = 13.29) revealed that 75% used a mobile phone after lights out at least once a month, with 12.8% making calls at any ti...
Article
Objectives: Elderly adults demonstrate a reduced ability to produce increasingly concise and coherent discourse with repetition when compared with their younger counterparts. We explored whether discourse efficiency and quality would increase with story retelling in a dialogic context. Method: Participants were 30 elderly adults aged between 65...
Article
We argue that maximising utility does not promote survival. Hence, there is no reason to expect people to modulate effort according to a task's opportunity costs. There is also no reason why our evaluation of the marginal opportunity costs of tasks should predictably rise with repetition. Thus, the opportunity cost model cannot explain why tasks ty...
Article
When young adults tell the same story repeatedly, their narratives become progressively more concise. Although impaired discourse production has been reliably demonstrated in the elderly, changes in narrative production with repetition have not been investigated in this cohort. Thirty young (aged 18-49 years, M=28.77, SD=9.73) and thirty elderly (a...
Article
This study examined the factor structure of the adapted Ruminative Response Scale in a large Australian older adult sample. Previously, the factor structure has only been explored in small UK sample and thus remains tentative. A further objective was to explore overlapping and distinct characteristics of worry, brooding and reflection in relation t...

Citations

... Motivated Reasoning focuses on people's tendency to findarguments in favor of the arguments they would like to believe rather than arguments they would not like to believe(Kunda, 1990). Inspired by Motivated Reasoning, researchers found that pre-existing attitudes or beliefs were crucial factors for predicting misinformation sharing (e.g.,Bauer and von Hohenberg, 2020;Grover et al., 2019;Saling et al., 2021). ...
... 13 Despite the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 among international students in the United States, 14 the link among mask wearing, perceived discrimination, and self-harming thoughts in this priority subpopulation of higher education has been understudied. [15][16][17][18] Our study attempted to provide preliminary evidence on the relationship among mask wearing, discrimination, and self-harming thoughts among international students in the United States in the COVID-19 context. Knowledge gained from the study will contribute to the evolving research on the reverberating impact of pandemic othering related to mask wearing among minoritized populations and can inform the design of mental health interventions and prevention for at-risk international students. ...
... The primary purpose of this study is to extend the research carried out in the area of school engagement, burnout and personality by conducting descriptive research to investigate the correlation and prediction relationships among these variables. The results indicated that the highest mean score obtained by the students for personality traits was agreeableness while the lowest was neuroticism, which was also supported by some other studies (Burke & Witt, 2004;Côté & Moskowitz, 1998;Jensen & Patel, 2011;Saling et al., 2019;Templer, 2012). On the other hand, levels of engagement and all dimensions of burnout were moderate among the participants, as also reported by Akbaşlı et al. (2019). ...
... Autobiographical memories are reconstructed each time they are told (Alea & Bluck, 2003;Conway et al., 2004;Kuhlen & Brennan, 2010;Saling et al., 2017). This dynamic process of reconstruction requires individuals to generate and sequence relevant ideas and details of the event, hold these in working memory, self-monitor the evolving narrative, and clarify ambiguities (Alea & Bluck, 2003;Conway et al., 2004;Kuhlen & Brennan, 2010;Reiser et al., 1985). ...
... A systematic review shows that nighttime phone use is related to measures of poor sleep 8 . However, most studies in the area are conducted among children and adolescents, and only a few studies have investigated nighttime smartphone use in relation to mental health in adult populations 6,23 . We have only been able to identify one study that reported on the longitudinal relationship between nighttime smartphone use and mental health in an adult population, and this study found no associations at follow-up 6 . ...
... One hypothesis to explain our results is that authors who publish in journals with higher citation impact would have better writing skills. In fact, people with less cognitive ability use more words to express information (Saling et al., 2012;Saling et al., 2016). Another hypothesis is that articles that cite more references would simply be more cited, which in fact occurs (consequently increasing CiteScore values) (Fox et al., 2016;Gargouri et al., 2010). ...
... This phenomenon is termed 'discourse compression'. When adults aged 65 years and over re-tell a story the resulting narratives are typically characterised by prolixity and tend to lack a cohesive and comprehensive message (Saling et al. 2012) This is the case both in a monologic context (Saling et al. 2012) and in a dialogic context when two older adults produce a story in tandem (Saling et al. 2014). ...
... Another study found that participants with a higher educational level performed better in naming with assistance and that phonemic cues benefited participants older than eight years of age in formal education. Studies show that less educated participants do not benefit from assistance to retrieve a name, demonstrating a lack of knowledge of the lexicon (26) . ...
... Furthermore, the internal working model is a cognitive scheme or cognitive style. Rumination, a negative cognitive style, consists of repetitive and compulsive thinking, negative deduction and attribution, malfunctioned attitudes, hopelessness, pessimism, and self-criticism (Geoffrey, 2010). The cognitive model of depression maintains that depression originates from a negative cognitive style (Rief and Joormann, 2019), which is influenced by insecure attachment and rumination. ...