Laura Naegler's research while affiliated with University of Liverpool and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Full-text available
At times of global unrest and the emergence of a wide range of protest movements, recent intra-disciplinary criminological debates on the potentials and limits of resistance suggest a paradoxical trend. Critical criminologists—in particular, those associated with the ultra-realist perspective—have become increasingly skeptical of the idea of “resis...
Article
Full-text available
Based on a case study conducted in Geylang, Singapore, this article explores the role of urban policing, surveillance and crime control as mechanisms of social ordering that contribute to the marginalisation of excluded groups, including low-income migrant workers and sex workers. Adopting a statecraft approach that emphasises the significance of ‘...
Article
In November 2018, Monica Baey, a student at the National University of Singapore (NUS) was recorded by a fellow student while showering in university accommodation. After the perpetrator was issued a formal warning and a one-semester suspension, Baey posted about the case on social media and named the perpetrator. This generated public support, new...
Article
This article addresses debates in the ‘post-Occupy movement’ over the resistant potential of prefigurative politics, and asks how prefiguration can be conceptualized as resistance in relation to activists’ understanding of politics, power and social change. Based on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews with activists in New York City, it looks at...
Article
Cultural criminology emerged in the mid-nineties with defining texts written by Jock Young, Keith Hayward, and Jeff Ferrell, among others. Since its inception, it has been criticized for its shallow connections with feminist theory. While in theory cultural criminology clearly acknowledges the influence of feminist scholarship, it has in practice o...
Chapter
Around the early 2000s, the periodic riots in Hamburg’s inner-city neighbourhood of Sternschanze changed profoundly. For decades, these riots constituted struggles between state authorities and militant anarchists of the autonome Szene (autonomous scene), entwined around resistance to consumer capitalism, control and police repression, and contesta...
Article
Since its beginning, the process of gentrification in Hamburg's Schanzenviertel has been accompanied by a wide variety of resistant activities from residents, urban social movements, and the neighborhood's anarchist scene. This resistance is controlled by preventative spatial measures, stemming from the criminalization of the anarchist scene and th...

Citations

... Manufacturing remains a crucial sector in Singapore accounting for 20% of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2019 but is led by Japanese, American and Taiwanese capital. Manufacturing also depends on the importation of Global South labour, rendered highly exploitable through the Work Permit visa system (Greener and Naegler, 2021). Singapore is a global shipping hub, accounting for around 7% of GDP, but, yet again, the industry depends on minimal taxation and disempowered migrant labour. ...
... In my contribution to this debate-and in response to the arguments raised by Ferrell-I provide a critical reflection on the analysis of the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement of 2011-12 by both cultural criminologists and ultra-realists. Drawing from my own research with the (post-)Occupy movement in New York City (Naegler 2018(Naegler , 2019, I argue that the accounts by ultra-realists and some cultural criminologists (e.g., Hayward 2016;Hayward and Schuilenburg 2014) tend to apply a narrow analytical lens at the expense of in-depth empirical engagement with these social movements. This narrow analytical lens results in a dismissive reading of social movement practice, knowledge production, and their role in collective struggle. ...
... The absence to date of police-'provoked' riots involving marginalized and ethnic minority young people makes Germany an interesting case. Although the two largest German cities -Berlin and Hamburg -sporadically face violent clashes between predominantly young people and the police (see Naegler, 2014), these incidents originate from a subculture of left-wing and anarchist groups and are often ritualized (for example in the case of street violence traditionally taking place on the First of May; see Rucht, 2012: 55). These features make them distinct from the type of spontaneous collective violence seen in Paris, London or Stockholm. ...
... Feminist criminology advocates a more critical examination of gender issues in society to understand crime (Burgess-Proctor, 2006; Carrington, 2014Carrington, , 2017; Chesney-Lind, 2020; Sabon, 2018). Feminist criminology perspectives are not simply the study of crimes committed by women (and girls), nor are they just studying women/girls as victims of crime (Carrington, 2014;Chesney-Lind, 2020;Lynch, 2018;Naegler & Salman, 2016). For example, while many gender differences appear in statistical investigations about crime, most of them are rarely expressed and embedded in the feminist epistemology of crime (Chesney-Lind, 2020; Gustafson, 1998;Smith & Torstensson, 1997). ...
... Scholars have begun to explore how people fail to re-adapt to a country they no longer call home (Brotherton and Barrios 2011), but this literature is still in its nascent phase. Others have called attention to a new American diaspora of global deportees and the US-born children they leave behind, a process Young (2007) describes as "social bulimia" (Arias 2013;Brotherton and Naegler 2014). Thus, the irrationalities of the contemporary punitive approach to immigration control have not only given rise to UPRs, but have also manifested in a new American diaspora of deportees throughout the world, which is quickly becoming a global social problem. ...