Laura L. Vidler's scientific contributions

Publications (5)

Chapter
Samuel Beckett’s 35-second ultra-minimalist play, Breath, reduces the human experience to a birth and a death, an entrance and an exit.1 Regardless of the number of performances, for each audience, for each performative act, characters are born and die again for the first time. Antonin Artaud also makes clear the ephemeral nature of performance: Le...
Chapter
Stanley Fish challenges the theoretical turn for its inability to formulate a general hermeneutics from within the limits of culture. “Theory begins and ends in interest and raises the imperatives of interest… to the status of universals.”1 In spite of neo-pragmatism’s insistence against “the idea of doing theory at all,”2 however, Terry Eagleton a...
Chapter
Close your eyes for a moment and imagine the smell, texture, and taste of a memorable meal. It is a dish you order repeatedly at your favorite restaurant in spite of your best intentions to try something new. Perhaps the meal is associated with a particular event, like the scene of your first date, or a memorable celebration. It is a meal you would...
Chapter
The relative objectivity and subjectivity of modern theatrical communication and interpretation has been the central question of performance theory for many decades now. The triangular discourse between Roland Barthes, Bertolt Brecht, and Mikhail Bakhtin beautifully illustrates this problem. Each presents, contradicts, defends, and subverts the oth...
Chapter
In Seeking Spatial Justice, Edward Soja relates that, in 1968, deteriorating conditions for the poor in the outskirts of Paris led to riots and unrest, even as public policy emphasized democratic ideals and principles. In spite of France’s insistence on égalité, Soja notes, the poor in Paris “were actually constrained by persistent republican value...