Laura J. Kornish's research while affiliated with University of Colorado Boulder and other places

Publications (23)

Article
At the “fuzzy front end” of an innovation process, organizations typically consider dozens, or even hundreds, of raw ideas. Selecting the best ones is a double challenge: evaluating so many ideas is a large undertaking, and the ideas in their raw form permit only noisy evaluations. In this paper, we demonstrate a further challenge to that large-sca...
Article
Idea generation and selection are fundamental activities in innovation. Scholars in many disciplines have written about these activities, addressing diverse perspectives. In this paper, we synthesize the research findings most applicable to the management of technology. First, we present findings on the process of idea generation: the importance of...
Article
Selection processes are everywhere in business and society: new product development, college admissions, hiring, and even academic journal submissions. Information on candidates is typically combined in a subjective or holistic manner, making assessment of the quality of the process challenging. In this paper, we address the question, “how can we d...
Article
This paper explores how important the quality of the raw idea is in determining success in innovation. On the one hand, one could argue that without a good idea, the chance of success is very small: “you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.” On the other hand, one could argue that with the right resources and approach, an innovator can creat...
Article
Modeling R&D as standard sequential search, we consider a monopolist who can implement a sequence of technological discoveries during the technology search process: he earns revenue on his installed technology while he engages in R&D to find improved technology. What is not standard is that he has a finite number of opportunities to introduce impro...
Article
A common approach to innovation, parallel search, is to identify a large number of opportunities and then to select a subset for further development, with just a few coming to fruition. One potential weakness with parallel search is that it permits repetition. The same, or a similar, idea might be generated multiple times, because parallel explorat...
Article
eferral bonuses, in which an existing customer gets an in-kind or cash reward for referring a new customer, are a popular way to stimulate word of mouth. In this paper, we examine key firm decisions about such bonuses. Others have studied referral bonus programs; a key difference is that we study the role of recommendations not just in spreading aw...
Article
In a typical innovation process, the innovator identifies or generates a set of raw opportunities or "ideas" before selecting one or more for further investment. This mode of innovation can be thought of as search within the opportunity space. In this paper we characterize some properties of innovation opportunity spaces as reflected by the set of...
Article
Full-text available
Seasonal products have an effective inventory deadline, a time by which the inventory must be ready to distribute. The deadline creates an incentive to start early with production. However, opportunities to gather information that might change production decisions provide an incentive to defer the start of production. We study the resultant dynamic...
Article
The Liquid Gold cases (see also the A case, UVA-QA-0587) are an adaptation of the earlier Calambra Olive Oil cases (UVA-QA-0440 and UVA-QA-0442). This version supports a modified classroom experience. The cases describe the start-up of Calambra, a company built to sell a premier brand of olive oil. Frank Lockfeld, the founder, has to determine how...
Article
When two competing and incompatible products coexist in a market, potential users face a choice between the two products and the alternative of deferring the decision. This paper examines the choice between the two substitutes, where each one is subject to a positive network effect. That is, a user of one of the products experiences an increase in...
Article
Using a common agency model, we investigate the interactions of a utility-maximizing auditor (the agent) with managers (who hire the agent for nonaudit services) and shareholders (who hire the agent for conducting an audit) of the same firm. In a single-period model, managerial discretion over consulting and other nonaudit service fees can influenc...
Article
Improving technologies create a "buy or wait?" dilemma. In this paper, we consider re-peat purchases when the consumer faces an infinite stream of new technologies. We develop a probabilistic model and focus on the role of "more variability" on the process of technological innovation. Similar to real options models, we find that variability in the...
Article
Full-text available
Recent consumer research suggests that lowering search costs for quality information reduces consumer price sensitivity by creating greater perceived differentiation among brands (e.g., Kaul and Wittink 1995; Lynch and Ariely 2000). We argue that lowering quality search costs by smart agents can have the opposite effect on differentiation and price...
Article
A durable-goods monopolist who will be introducing new and improved versions of his product must decide how to price his products, keeping in mind the relative attractiveness of the current and future products. Dhebar (1994) has shown that if technology is changing too quickly and the producer cannot credibly commit to future prices and quality, th...
Article
Using a common agency model, we investigate the strategies of self-interested auditors (the agent) hired by both managers (for non-audit services) and shareholders (conducting an audit) of the same firm. In a single period model, managerial discretion over consulting fees can influence auditors to issue reports that are more favorable than warrante...
Article
Y. Balcer and S. A. Lippman (1984, J. Econ. Theory34, 292–318) develop a model to analyze the “buy or wait” problem under technological change. They show that this dynamic problem has a threshold solution: if the difference between the best available technology and that currently held exceeds a certain threshold, then buy. They also claim that the...
Article
Full-text available
In running a website, a firm balances two potential streams of revenue: sales of goods, services, or information content to visitors; and sales of advertising space to other organizations. Web-based businesses thus operate in "two-sided markets," selling something of value to visitors and selling visitors' attention, and advertising choices affect...
Article
Full-text available
We analyze deliberation strategies in a setting with a production deadline. In this dynamic decision problem, there is a choice between two courses of action and a third alternative of delaying the commitment to gather more information about the prevalence or popularity of each action. The deadline affects the cost of information gathering, which i...

Citations

... Design researchers agree that the most flexible phase for co-design during the entire design process, the "fuzzy front-end", is precisely the main stage in which co-design happens [69,70]. During this stage, creativity plays a key role [71,72]. Thus, creativity indicators can determine the superiority of the design outcomes during this stage [73][74][75]. ...
... By applying the outside-in process, organizations access and utilize external ideas, technologies and/or know-how in one or more of the four phases of open innovation (1) idea generation, (2) experimentation, (3) manufacturing, and (4) marketing and sales (Lazzarotti & Manzini, 2009). In the early phase of organizational innovation processes, idea generation and selection constitute fundamental steps (Hansen & Birkinshaw, 2007;Kornish & Hutchison-Krupat, 2017). To generate ideas, organizations involve external contributors to source their ideas and knowledge (Hilgers & Ihl, 2010;Poetz & Schreier, 2012). ...
... Idea selection is a convergent activity (Rietzschel et al. 2006) that aims to identify generated idea(s) that are promising and should advance to the next stage (Kornish and Ulrich 2014b). This can be challenging, as the identification of the most promising ideas depends on the contest sponsor's values and expectations (King and Lakhani 2013) and can therefore vary from competition to competition. ...
... In crowdsourcing contests, participants share a vast amount of potential solutions to innovation problems through online platforms (Terwiesch and Xu, 2008;Jeppesen and Lakhani, 2010;Füller et al., 2014). The shared idea descriptions vary in their degree of elaboration and comprise a specific configuration of features (Kornish and Ulrich, 2011;Kornish and Hutchison-Krupat, 2017). Compared to situations where organizations or teams search by themselves, through crowdsourcing, different parts of the solution space can be accessed by considering the diverse perspectives on the problem (Jeppesen and Lakhani, 2010;von Hippel and von Krogh, 2016). ...
... In another context,Kornish and Watts (2011) examine the number of ads on a page in order to examine the relationship between number of ads and the degree of cross-platform competition. ...
... From an idea, an opportunity is developed over time and with some eff ort, but not all ideas are developed into opportunities that are ready for exploitation (Shane and Venkatamaran, 2000;Janovics and Christiansen, 2003;Belousova and Gailly, 2012;Kornish and Ulrich, 2014;Vogel, 2017). ...
... However, the relation between the client-specific quasi-rent and auditors' total quasi-rents (as a proxy for auditor independence) is undetermined, because Beck et al. (1988) do not consider the effect of the regulation on the structure of the audit market. Kornish and Levine (2004) and Beck and Wu (2006) examine audit quality but also do not address the market structure. Kornish and Levine (2004) use an agency model to examine the interactions of a self-interested and profit-maximizing auditor with two principals: the manager, who can demand NAS in addition to the audit, and shareholders, who prefer a truthful report. ...
... Wu et al., 2020). Kornish (2009) studied five datasets and developed three fake review distribution models. They used helpful votes to determine the quality of the reviews and found reviews that received fewer helpfulness votes were more likely to be manipulated. ...
... This is because idea quality in innovation should be related to some combination of the need the idea addresses and the solution the idea embodies. If two ideas address a similar need or embody a similar solution, they are likely to be of similar quality (Kornish and Ulrich (2009)). Two phenomena are likely to limit the variation in the ideas generated by teams. ...
... We capture such innovation arrival by a Poisson process akin to the search model introduced in [10], where the optimal stopping policy for the search that maximizes the expected return is characterized as a threshold in the job qualityx; accept the job if x ≥x, otherwise continue to search. This search process and its variants have been often used in modeling technological discoveries [11,9,7]. The main trade-off is between R&D effort (which incurs cost) and timing (expected R&D completion) that ultimately affects the firm's sustainability. ...