László Marácz's research while affiliated with University of Amsterdam and other places

Publications (19)

Article
This article revisits a well-known dichotomy (the ‘territorial’ and ‘personal’ principles) and develops a four-element classification of state approaches (from the most generous to the most menacing, from the perspective of speakers of minority languages). The article examines the implications for language policy of geographically dispersed or spat...
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New forms of mobility presuppose a technological factor that frames it as ‘topological proximity,’ regardless of the nature of the mobile agent (human being, robot ware, animal, virus, digital object). The appeal of the so-called linguas francas is especially evident in human beings showing high propensity to move, i.e., motility. They are usually...
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Multilingual or linguistically heterogeneous societies are increasing around the globe. Socio-political processes, like Europeanization and globalization, are responsible for this expansion. Universal norms and standards for language use and identity are spreading, mediated by international organizations and charters. In this view, multilingualism...
Chapter
In an interdisciplinary approach, the study discusses some of the legal and socioeconomic aspects of Hungarian minority language use in the northwestern part of Romania, Transylvania. It presents traditional and innovative models of language activism in the region and discusses how supranational rules and market deregulation that followed the EU ac...
Article
In this paper a normative position will be defended. We will argue that minimal territorial minority language rights formulated in terms of the personality principle referring to traditional minority languages granted in the framework of the European Union (EU) are a benchmark for non-territorial linguistic rights. Although territorial minority lan...
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This is a thematic issue on the relation between multilingualism and social inclusion. Due to globalization, Europeanization, supranational and transnational regulations linguistic diversity and multilingualism are on the rise. Migration and old and new forms of mobility play an important role in these processes. As a consequence, English as the on...
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This paper studies the consequences of European multilingualism and multilingual communication for a common social policy in the Europe Union. In the past fifty years, the main focus of the Europeanization project has been on financial-economic developments and less on a common social policy. Even today, there is no common framework for social prot...
Article
This article analyses two options the Hungarian ethno-linguistic community in the Transylvanian region of Romania has in order to preserve its ethno-linguistic identity. Firstly, there is the option of unrestricted language use in the public domain. At present the Romanian legal framework assigns members of the Hungarian speaking community in Trans...
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The relevance of languages and multilingual communication for social policy and solidarity in the context of the nation-state has generally been recognized. However, in the context of Europeanization, this factor has been underestimated and neglected in scientific research. This paper argues that languages and multilingual communication are relevan...
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This article investigates the situation of Hungarian ethno-linguistic minorities in Slovenia and the Slovak Republic. It compares the extent to which the two minority groups’ interests are satisfied and provides an explanation for differences between their de facto statuses. The authors use a logic-based methodology to extract the key parties, issu...
Article
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Territorial arrangements for managing inter-ethnic relations within states are far from consensual. Although self-governance for minorities is commonly advocated, international documents are ambiguously formulated. Conflicting pairs of principles, territoriality vs. personality, and self-determination vs. territorial integrity, along with diverging...

Citations

... Multilingualism was uncontested prior to the emergence of global multi-level governance, but it can now be considered as a threat to national social cohesiveness. Languages of long-established territorial minorities have gained formal recognition in numerous areas, which has in some cases resulted in new structures of municipal, regional, and national government (Csata & Marácz, 2021). ...
... If, on the contrary, we view this process as the dissemination of something radically different from English, something often referred to, by its proponents, as English as a lingua franca (ELF). In the literature, ELF is indeed sometimes used to refer to English as spoken by non-native speakers, with morphological and lexical features that depart from those of standard English (for an extensive discussion of ELF see Gobbo & Marácz, 2021). ELF advocates claim that these non-standard characteristics should be accepted. ...
... For example, in Göteborg, Sweden, Romanian is most commonly used by migration organizations. In a framework of multilevel governance (MLG), the complications arising from newcomers' language competencies and their implications for the tension between mobility and inclusion may be resolved (Houtkamp-Marácz 2018). ...
... At the same time, RMDSZ, is also wary of re-drawing administrative-territorial units so as not to disadvantage the Hungarian community. The current the status quo of 41 administrative counties includes counties where Hungarians form a majority in Harghita and Covasna and a sizeable majority in others like Szatmár (34.7%) (Csata and Marácz 2018). In terms of regionalism (regionalizmus or regionalismul, in Hungarian and Romanian, respectively), all Hungarian political actors use the idea of regions in their party platforms, albeit slightly differently (SZNT 2003;Magyar Polgári Párt 2008;EMNP 2013;RMDSZ 2016). ...
... At the same time, language policy uses political formations and their theoretical debates to create and strengthen links between language and citizenship; these debates, from political theory, explore arguments about social inclusion, either through the exis-tence and use of a shared and almost always dominant language, or through individual and public multilingualism (Ricento, 2006). In either case, linguistic diversity and social inclusion emerge here as facets of political and social praxis across a spectrum between monolingual and multilingual policy approaches, with complex and rather multi-layered relations between them (Marácz & Adamo, 2017). ...
... Minority language recognition in Europe often follows a territoriality principle-i.e., the belief that minority communities in a given locality, if sufficiently large, should be linguistically accommodated (Csata and Marácz 2016;De Schutter 2008). This accommodation includes the use of the minority language in all official matters, including at city offices, in judicial proceedings, and in all government communications. ...
... Contrary to Van Parijs, Marácz (2016) argues that languages and multilingual communication are relevant for the development of Social Europe. Thus, in the current unfair situation, there is a European elite who speaks a European variety of global English, whereas half of the EU citizens do not have any knowledge of English at all. ...
... Ebből kifolyólag a Vajdaságban jelenleg 71 általános iskolában, 5 valamint 35 középiskolában (ebből 10 gimnáziumban) 6 folyik a tanítás magyar nyelven. Ugyanakkor sok más közép-és kelet-európai országhoz hasonlóan (Marácz 2016, vö. Brubaker et al. 2006) a többségi nyelvet anyanyelvként beszélők Szerbiában is egynyelvű hozzáállást mutatnak, vagyis nem tartják szükségesnek megtanulni a kisebbségi nyelvek valamelyikét. ...
... The shift in Western Europe's decision to encapsulate national minority rights as a part of human rights led to the promotion of negative national minority rights. Generic human rights promotion has been criticized as limited in their scope since they do not explicitly address the needs of national minority communities (Kelley, 2004;Kymlicka, 2009;Mabry, McGarry, Moore, and O'Leary, 2013;Lempp, 2015). ...
... Clearly, the nature of a language regime -whether or not territorially baseddepends on political and contextual conditions (McRae, 2007;May, 2012;Williams, 2013;Dembinska et al., 2014;Vizi, 2016). Quite often, minority and migrant languages are granted specific rights in the context of a regime that prioritises an established official language. ...