Lara Lundsgaard-Hansen's research while affiliated with Centre for Environment and Development and other places

Publications (10)

Article
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Unlabelled: Transdisciplinary research (TDR) has been developed to generate knowledge that effectively fosters the capabilities of various societal actors to realize sustainability transformations. The development of TDR theories, principles, and methods has been largely governed by researchers from the global North and has reflected their context...
Article
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Oil palm landscapes are often characterised by land conflicts. Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSP) may be a promising means to contribute to conflict resolution. However, the merits of MSPs are limited in contexts with strong power imbalances and entrenched conflict histories. This study analyses an MSP from Myanmar. We developed an analytical framew...
Article
During a civil war and its aftermath, rival powerholders frequently engage in decision-making over land use, for example, via land acquisitions or legal reforms. This paper explores how powerholders influence land use decision-making and what their engagement implies for territorial control. We analyse three cases of land use changes in Myanmar’s s...
Article
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Competition over land is at the core of many sustainable development challenges in Myanmar: villagers, companies, governments, ethnic minority groups, civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations from local to the international level claim access to and decision-making power over the use of land. Therefore, this article investigat...
Article
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Amid Myanmar’s political transition and despite its new government’s discourse of inclusion and dialogue, land conflicts have increased across the country’s ethnic-minority areas. We argue that land plays a central role in the complex interplay of state formation, armed conflict and international development in Myanmar’s contested borderlands and t...
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Tropical forest landscapes are undergoing vast transformations. Myanmar was long an exception to this trend – until recent policy reforms put economic development at the forefront. Under ambiguous land rights, commercial agriculture has spread rapidly, causing an unprecedented loss of biodiversity-rich forest. In south-eastern Myanmar, where land t...
Chapter
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Die Ausgabe 2020 nimmt mit Subsahara-Afrika erstmals einen geografischen Fokus ein und möchte dazu beitragen, stereotype Vorstellungen aufzubrechen. Kein anderer Kontinent unterliegt so klischeehaften Charakterisierungen wie Afrika, das oft nur im Kontext von Krisen, Kriegen und Katastrophen wahrgenommen wird. Alleine die Wachstumszahlen vermitteln...
Article
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How far have higher education institutions progressed towards integrating sustainable development at an institutional level and are they responding to the societal need for transformation? Can the pace of transformation be accelerated, given the urgency of the issues our world is facing? As a practice-oriented contribution to this broader debate —...
Article
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Myanmar has experienced profound transformations of land use and land governance, often at the expense of smallholders. Empirical evidence on the agency of actors included and excluded in land use decision-making remains scarce. This study analyses who influences land use decision-making, how they do this, and under what circumstances smallholders...

Citations

... Moreover, researchers are usually external actors who must interact with local actors to achieve meaningful impacts. In our case, the establishment of bilateral relations created close partnerships that eased the way through networking, which is necessary to increase the legitimacy of external actors [48]. A side effect of this trust-building practice was the emergence of a "hierarchy of knowledge", which influenced the inclusion and exclusion of actors. ...
... In Indonesia, for example, the expansion of oil palm plantations from the 1960s until today has been linked to (re-)territorialisation processes toward achieving centralisation of the state [5,6]. In Myanmar, the military-led state used the handing over of oil palm concessions to companies during the 1990s and 2000s to gain physical access for its troops to a remote rebel-controlled area, which strengthened the military's territorial control [7]. The expansion of oil palm landscapes is also known to be part of a resource, wealth, and power accumulation strategy of the domestic elite, for example in Guatemala, Indonesia, and Myanmar [3,[8][9][10]. ...
... The trend of urbanization in ood zones continues to rise globally, especially in Africa and Asia (Jongman et On the other hand, land scarcity and degradation is a process with adverse and ecological consequence, especially devastating for the world's poorest people living in drylands (Minelli 2017). Land resources are the guarantee of food security, and the changes in its utilization are affect by both social economy and ecology Schneider et al. 2020). Therefore, water and land resources play an important role in the sustainability of social economy, environment and ecology. ...
... Palm oil (PO) helps attain SDG 1 No Poverty by reducing rural poverty, SDG 2 Zero Hunger by producing the most versatile and efficient vegetable oil in the world, SDG 8 Decent Work and Economic Growth by generating income above the poverty line, SDG 10 Reduced Inequality by decreasing inequality between urban and rural populations, and SDG 13 Climate Action by promoting forest conservation and sustainable production [19][20][21][22], and the global expansion of PO production, especially in South East Asia, LATAM, and West Africa [21], has led to a wide variety of concerns related to ecosystem integrity, such as, greenhouse emissions (GHG), forests of high conservation value (HCV), waste generation, High Carbon Stock Forests (HCS), habitat degradation, deforestation (PO generates an annual loss of 270,000 hectares of forests, in contrast with 380,000 from lumber, 480,000 from soy and 2,710,000 from livestock farming) [24,[73][74][75][76][77][78][79][80][81][82], biodiversity, and land use change (LUC) [21,23]. [27,[83][84][85][86][87][88][89][90][91][92]. ...
... Additionally, many of the granted land permits were rather inaccurate in terms of geographic location [42] and frequently did not consider the existence of villages in these areas. Furthermore, local organisations and researchers have identified the oil palm sector as a leading cause of deforestation, especially in the southern Tanintharyi Region [34,44,[46][47][48]. Moreover, the expansion of oil palm has also reduced the local population's access to natural resources, which are of high importance for their livelihoods, such as for agriculture or for collecting non-timber forest products [30,49]. ...
... Ideally, the same quality education should be provided to all children regardless of their SES, race, gender, and religious faith [2]. The agenda further recommends that the availability of subjects and programs should ideally be controlled according to the needs of the country, where students' abilities, merits, competencies, and interests would serve as the basis for allocating subjects and programs to be studied [3]. Providing prejudice based on SES, race, and other factors in order to study a favourable subject or a program is not just labelled as a form of discrimination and disparity, but it is considered a graver threat to sustainable development in education [4]. ...
... Especially in these borderlands, armed conflicts have resulted in continued humanitarian crises and countless internally displaced people and refugees in the neighbouring countries [7,28]. During this era, land governance was determined by formal and informal institutions favouring the well-connected and rich domestic elite, including the military high-ranking officials [12,13,29,30]. Many large-scale land concessions were granted between 1988 and 2010, but particularly to those who already had access to political and economic resources such as military-linked companies [29]. ...
... However, it has rarely been applied to reconstruct dense land use change histories. Co-production of land use information together with local land users has the potential to foster social learning processes and empower marginalized land users (McCall and Minang 2005;Schneider et al. 2017). Accordingly, participatory mapping can serve as both a scientific and a political tool and is well suited to support integrative and engaged science (Ernoul et al. 2018). ...