La'Toya V. Latney's research while affiliated with The Center for Bird and Exotic Animal Medicine and other places

Publications (16)

Article
This article updates the understanding of two extirpation-driving infectious diseases, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans, and Ranavirus. Experimental studies and dynamic, multifactorial population modeling have outlined the epidemiology and future population impacts of B dendrobatidis, B salamandrivorans, and Rana...
Article
This article details emerging infectious diseases that have devastating impacts on captive and wild squamates. Treatment advances have been attempted for Cryptosporidium infections in squamates. Gram-positive bacteria, Devriesea agamarum and Austwickia chelonae, are contributing to severe disease in captive and now in wild reptiles, some critically...
Article
Steroid hormones regulate reproductive investment and play a critical role in coordinating reproductive responses to both short and long-term environmental change. Laboratory studies typically examine the mechanistic relationships among steroids and reproductive processes under controlled conditions and may fail to identify any seasonal patterns in...
Article
Mycoplasma species are important pathogens of captive and free-ranging chelonians. Bourret’s box turtle (Cuora bourreti) is a critically endangered species of Indochinese box turtle in the family Geoemydidae. Four privately owned wild-caught Bourret’s box turtles were presented for clinical evaluation for anorexia and lethargy following shipment fr...
Article
Full-text available
Canine influenza virus (CIV) subtypes H3N8 and H3N2 are endemic among domestic dog (XXXX XXXXX) populations in the northeastern US. Infection of free-ranging carnivores with influenza virus has been sporadically reported. Generalist mesocarnivores that exploit anthropogenic, peri-urban habitats share a wide interface with domestic dogs that allows...
Article
Objective: To describe the radiographic and ultrasonographic characteristics of the spleen and abdominal lymph nodes in clinically healthy ferrets. Materials and methods: Fifty-five clinically healthy ferrets were prospectively recruited for this cross-sectional study. Three-view whole body radiographs and abdominal ultrasonography were performe...
Article
A focal, necrotic soft tissue mass was diagnosed on the left forelimb of an adult, wild, intact female bog turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii). Excisional biopsy revealed that the mass was a soft tissue sarcoma and a full limb amputation was performed. Because mesenchymal tumors are rarely reported in chelonians this case demonstrates that neoplasia sh...
Article
OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether the nutritive quality of Tenebrio molitor larvae and Zophobas morio larvae, which are commonly cultured as live food sources, is influenced by 4 commercially available diets used as nutritional substrates; identify which diet best improved calcium content of larvae; and identify the feeding time interval that assured t...
Article
CASE DESCRIPTION A 1-year-old reticulated python (Python reticulatus) was evaluated because of a 2-week history of wheezing and hissing. CLINICAL FINDINGS Rostral facial cellulitis and deep gingival pockets associated with missing rostral maxillary teeth were evident. Tissues of the nares were swollen, resulting in an audible wheeze during respirat...
Article
A 7-yr-old male captive American bullfrog ( Lithobates catesbeianus ) presented with a 2-wk history of an enlarged, ulcerated nuptial pad on the mediopalmar surface of the first digit of the left carpus. A 3-mm wedge biopsy of the mass was not diagnostic and differentials included an epidermal inclusion cyst or squamous cell carcinoma. No fungal or...
Chapter
Providing nutritional support to exotic pet (EP) species such as birds, reptiles and small mammals presents a unique challenge for the practitioner. This chapter addresses the nutritional needs of exotic pets in practice need not be difficult, as long as protocols are in place for stocking, safe food preparation, expiration date monitoring, and pro...
Article
Full-text available
Encephalitozoonosis is a significant microsporidial disease of captive pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). This article overviews the life cycle, pathogenesis, and host immune response to the parasite. Clinical presentation, differential diagnoses, antemortem diagnostics, and postmortem diagnosis will be discussed. International seroprevalence dat...
Article
The study of amphibian nutrition requires a detailed review of species-specific natural prey analysis. Invertebrate nutrient composition has been formally studied for more than 60 years and presents the following conclusions: (1) in general, insects are poor in overall calcium content; (2) larval insects have high fat and protein components; and (3...
Article
This review summarizes the most recent updates on emerging infectious diseases of amphibia. A brief summary of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis history, epidemiology, pathogenesis, life cycle, diagnosis, treatment, and biosecurity is provided. Ambystoma tigrinum virus, common midwife toad virus, frog virus 3, Rana grylio virus, Rana catesbeiana ranav...
Article
It is important that reptile clinicians have an appreciation for the epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology, diagnostic options, and prognostic parameters for novel and emerging infectious diseases in squamates. This article provides an update on emerging squamate diseases reported in the primary literature within the past decade. Updates on adeno...

Citations

... According to Long et al. (2019), Oo exhibits optimal growth at temperatures around 258C (778F), which corresponds to spring temperatures in the eastern United States. Temperature-driven pathogenicity has also been observed in other fungal diseases such as Bd in amphibians (Latney and Klaphake, 2013). Identifying the effects of temperature on pathogenicity would help in narrowing the surveillance period for this EID. ...
... On the other hand, global trade of reptiles is flourishing; tens of thousands of individuals from an increasing number of species are displaced among continents under minimal (or non-existent for illegal trade) sanitary monitoring (Auliya et al., 2016). The resulting flows of individuals open major routes for the expansion of EIDs (DiGeronimo et al., 2019). Pet tortoises host both TeHV and Mycoplasma spp. ...
... There have only been a few studies investigating IAVs in wild mesopredator species (Hall et al. 2008;Root et al. 2014;DiGeronimo et al. 2019). To address the question of whether influenza viruses naturally infect these species, we acquired sera from across the USA and analyzed them for evidence of exposure to IAVs. ...
... Reported use of regional anesthetic techniques in reptiles are limited, including dental nerve blocks in crocodilians and spinal anesthesia in turtles, tortoises and lizards (Wellehan et al. 2006;Mans 2014;Ferreira & Mans 2019;Bianchi et al. 2020;Futema et al. 2020). Whereas case reports of local anesthetic nerve blocks of the thoracic limb have been published (Clabaugh et al. 2005;Latney et al. 2017), a prospective study evaluating a technique for regional anesthesia of the thoracic limb has not been performed in chelonians. Wide anatomic variation among species and minimal knowledge of specific neuroanatomy limits successful performance of nerve blocks in these species . ...
... Lower extremity vascular diseases in patients with diabetes mellitus generally cannot be detected clinically in the early stages due to the common complications of neuropathy [2,3]. Patients with diabetes mellitus usually are unaware of the fact that the early progress of lower extremity vascular disease is due to the loss of pain and the decreasing frequency of intermittent claudication, until the symptoms get worsen and the disease turns into an ulcer or gangrene, which usually occurs at the last stage of the lower extremity vascular disease and eventually leads to amputation [4,5]. Therefore, the early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes patients requires the index of early lower extremity vascular disease, which helps in avoiding amputation and in improving the living quality of patients [6,7]. ...
... calcium and 0.75-0.9% phosphorous on a dry matter basis (DM), resulting in Ca:P ratios between 1:8 and 1:17 (Zwart and Rulkens, 1979;Klasing et al., 2000;Finke, 2002Finke, , 2015Latney et al., 2017). ...
... It has been suggested (de Farias et al. 2012) that it may occur secondary to periodontitis or traumatic gum wounds, resembling the process in livestock. Latney et al. (2016) reported a clinical case of maxillary and premaxillary osteomyelitis in a reticulated python. Staphylococcus sciuri, Enterococcus faecalis and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were isolated from cultures of the resected maxillary bone. ...
... This may be because rapid dispersion of the lidocaine led to an insufficient concentration at the injection site for reliable anti-nociception. Previous researchers using a lower dose have reported anti-nociception of 1-2 mg kg − 1 lidocaine using a needle prick test under sedation/anesthesia using alfaxalone, or using lidocaine alone for minor procedures (Gentz, 2007;Latney et al., 2015;Lennox, 2013). We assessed nociception at maximum sedation, specifically to test for co-incidence of local antinociception and general sedation. ...
... With the continued formation and accumulation of spores within the intracellular space, the host cell eventually ruptures and releases spores into extracellular spaces, spreading the infection locally, through direct extension to the surrounding cells, and at a distance through invasion of the vascular system (Wasson and Peper 2000). Thus, the main target organs of this microsporidian parasite are those with high blood flow, leading to the formation of granulomatous lesions, as result of exuberant inflammatory infiltrates, mainly in the kidneys, eyes, and brain, but also in the liver, lungs, and heart (Latney et al. 2014). ...
... Proximate nutrient analyses for four species of cockroach at two developmental stages, including one species that has not been nu- (Barker et al., 1998;Finke, 2002Finke, , 2013Martin et al., 1976;Oonincx & Dierenfeld, 2012;Pennino et al., 1991). Similar to previous studies which compared the nutrient content of larvae, beetles, and nymph crickets to adult life stages, in the current study, nymph cockroaches also had less protein content than adults (Barker et al., 1998;Finke, 2002;Latney & Clayton, 2014 (Barker et al., 1998;Finke, 2002;Frye & Calvert, 1989;Oonincx & Dierenfeld, 2012). However, the B. lateralis CP values for nymphs in the current study (55.9%) were lower than the nymph range (62.9-76.1) ...