Kyoung-Rae Jung's research while affiliated with Salisbury University and other places

Publications (4)

Article
In educational psychology, academic self-efficacy and self-regulation of effort have been identified as significant non-cognitive predictors of academic performance in college students, even above and beyond cognitive predictors (e.g., SAT, ACT scores). According to social cognitive theory and research on self-regulated learning, self-regulation of...
Article
Full-text available
Many ethnic minorities in the United States consider themselves to be just as American as their European American counterparts. However, there is a persistent cultural stereotype of ethnic minorities as foreigners (i.e., the perpetual foreigner stereotype) that may be expressed during interpersonal interactions (i.e., foreigner objectification). Th...
Article
This investigation examined social connectedness as distinct from extraversion and as a mediation variable in the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being. A college student sample (N=295) and a sample of individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB; N=148) completed measures of extraversion, social connectedness,...

Citations

... On the one hand, other latent teaching and learning variables affect academic performance, such as self-regulation of effort (Jung et al., 2017) and perfectionism (Kljajic et al., 2017). Previous studies rarely considered these factors as control variables when exploring the relationship between learning approaches and student achievement (Everaert et al., 2017). ...
... Social connectedness refers to the experience of belonging to a social relationship or network and includes a person's subjective awareness of being in close relationship with the people around. Social connectedness is a mediator in the relationship between extraversion and subjective wellbeing (Lee et al., 2008). Having supportive relationships is one of the strongest predictors of wellbeing, with a notably positive effect (Myers, 2003). ...
... Many Multicultural people experience discrimination when they are stereotyped as perpetual foreigners despite self-identification as American (Armenta et al., 2013;Liang et al., 2004;Tuan, 1998). These experiences are driven by perceptions that Multicultural Americans do not match ideal American values, behaviors, or beliefs (Armenta et al., 2013). ...
... Asians continue to be viewed as foreigners whose cultural values and practices are not only incompatible with the North American way of life, but also threats to the health and well-being of Canadian people (Huynh et al., 2011;Lee et al., 2014;Leong & Okazaki, 2009). As a result, Asian Americans and Asian Canadians may not feel accepted as full members of their respective societies (i.e., perceived foreigner objectification; Armenta et al., 2013;Noels et al., 2010). Not only might these pervasive cultural stereotypes prevent CCs from fully integrating into Canadian society, but they may also lead to rejection of one's heritage Chinese identity, which is linked to a higher risk of distress (Kim et al., 2012). ...