Kristen S. Genet's research while affiliated with Anoka-Ramsey Community College and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
Landscape‐scale alterations that accompany urbanization may negatively affect the population structure of wildlife species such as freshwater turtles. Changes to nesting sites and higher mortality rates due to vehicular collisions and increased predator populations may particularly affect immature turtles and mature female turtles. We hypothesized...
Article
Understanding the scales over which land use affects animal populations is critical for conservation planning, and it can provide information about the mechanisms that underlie correlations between species distributions and land use. We used a citizen science database of anuran surveys to examine the relationship between road density, land use and...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Habitat loss, fragmentation, and isolation pose significant threats to pond-breeding amphibians. Anthropogenic influences that contribute to these factors are particularly harmful because the majority of amphibians require two vastly different habitats for completion of their life cycle. We investigated how pond-breedi...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Habitat loss and fragmentation represent significant threats to amphibians. Fragmentation is particularly harmful because many amphibians migrate between aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and even narrow bands of unsuitable habitat can act as barriers to movement. Additionally, amphibians are slow-moving and prone to r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Freshwater turtle populations can be profoundly impacted by urbanization. Adult females may experience high mortality with increased road density near nesting sites, leading to a male-biased population. Juvenile recruitment can be reduced by the high density of predators that often exist in human-dominated landscapes,...

Citations

... Turtles in urban environments are generally considered to be under significant pressure from anthropogenic sources, including, but not limited to, road mortality, collecting for pets, pollution, altered thermal environments, and the presence of dense populations of subsidized predators [6,10,11,[28][29][30]. However, a few studies have found that turtles in such environments can persist and even appear to be viable over long time periods (e.g., [12][13][14][15]). ...
... Crowdsourcing can offer an effective solution to gather a mass of observations, as it can provide a large sample size from an extensive area (Devictor et al., 2010;Newman et al., 2011). For example, photographs and metadata submitted by citizen scientists (who are also called community scientists or volunteers) have been used to study animal behaviour (Maritz andMaritz, 2020, Durso et al., 2021;Forti et al., 2022), including habitat use (Marsh et al., 2017). While the primary use of citizen science data is to obtain information on species occurrence, gaining other (often unintended) secondary data, such as behavioural information, can answer many scientific questions . ...
... Citizen science efforts have been used to document trends in anuran occupancy as part of the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program (Cosentino et al. 2014;Weir et al. 2014;Villena et al. 2016). Herpetological statewide atlases have been significantly aided by citizen scientists (Cunningham et al. 2012;Gibbs et al. 2007;Jensen et al. 2008;Price and Dorcas 2011). ...