Kirsten Cater's research while affiliated with University of Bristol and other places

Publications (44)

Article
This paper presents a novel mobile serious game, "Space Vision", which uses a hidden-object mechanic with fiducial marker detection to gamify a clinical test of visual acuity - a key marker of childhood eye disease. For Space Vision to become a credible clinical tool that can facilitate the screening and home-monitoring of children's visual acuity,...
Article
Full-text available
Collaborations between human–computer interaction (HCI) researchers and arts practitioners frequently centre on the development of creative content using novel – often emergent – technologies. Concurrently, many of the techniques that HCI researchers use in evaluative participant-based research have their roots in the arts – such as sketching, writ...
Article
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Consumer virtual reality (VR) headsets (e.g. Oculus Go) have brought VR non-fiction (VRNF) within reach of at-home audiences. However, despite increase in VR hardware sales and enthusiasm for the platform among niche audiences at festivals, mainstream audience interest in VRNF is not yet proven. This is despite a growing body of critically acclaime...
Conference Paper
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For looked after and adopted children, physical objects are often the only remaining link to their past; a portal to stories of birth families, former homes, and significant people. Yet, often these stories can be littered with traumatic events preventing them from moving forward with their lives. Through reminiscence of these stories and attemptin...
Conference Paper
Virtual Reality nonfiction (VRNF) is an emerging form of immersive media experience created for consumption using panoramic "Virtual Reality" headsets. VRNF promises nonfiction content producers the potential to create new ways for audiences to experience "the real"; allowing viewers to transition from passive spectators to active participants. Our...
Conference Paper
Enriching the lives of animals under human care is not a new concept but the methods of doing so are rapidly evolving in zoos. Zoo-based enrichment is traditionally low-tech, often failing to maintain animals' long-term interest. Meanwhile, evaluating the intricacies of enrichment device use remains difficult. 'Cognitive' enrichment aims to challen...
Conference Paper
In this paper, we present the results of an evaluation of preschool children playing five commercially available mobile computer games, the results of which will inform the user-led redesign of 'Space Vision', a serious mobile game for early identification and home-monitoring of vision problems for children of preschool age (3-5 years). Currently,...
Conference Paper
In this paper we present the Resonant Interface Rocking Chair, interactive furniture designed for sparking the imagination of residents in dementia care. We show how the chair, sitting at the intersection of slow technology, reminiscence research and elder care, creates an environment that encourages storytelling, interaction and conversation betwe...
Conference Paper
In this paper we present our initial ethnographic work from developing TopoTiles, Tangible User Interfaces designed to aid storytelling, reminiscence and community building in care homes. Our fieldwork has raised a number of questions which we discuss in this paper including: How can landscape tangibles be used as proxy objects, standing in for lan...
Conference Paper
The squeeze of an arm during a tense moment in a story -- an absentminded caress on the back of the hand while listening to an engaging tale -- the physical presence and interpersonal touch of a loved one can be an important part of reading to a child. However the thrill of the tale is often lost and the intimacy diluted when separated families hav...
Article
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This paper presents the concept of Resonant Bits, an interaction technique for encouraging engaging, slow and skilful interaction with tangible, mobile and ubiquitous devices. The technique is based on the resonant excitation of harmonic oscillators and allows the exploration of a number of novel types of tangible interaction including: ideomotor c...
Conference Paper
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Community activist groups typically rely on core groups of highly motivated members. In this paper we consider how crowdsourcing strategies can be used to supplement the activities of pro-environmental community activists, thus increasing the scalability of their campaigns. We focus on mobile data collection applications and strategies that can be...
Conference Paper
Cities serious about achieving sustainability need to consider what the role of information might be for them, while acknowledging their municipalities as being more complex than the sum of the physical infrastructure. This paper argues that predicting the future is not a useful mechanism for city planning, and claims that this can actually be disr...
Article
Mobile devices are increasingly providing novel ways for users to engage with the spaces around them. However, there are few systematic studies of enhancing spatial ability with mobile devices, and applications such as turn-by-turn navigation systems have even been associated with a decline in spatial skills. In this paper we present a study based...
Article
Evidence suggests that athletically trained individuals are more accurate than untrained individuals in updating their spatial position through idiothetic cues. We assessed whether training at different spatial scales affects the accuracy of path integration. Groups of rugby players (large-scale training) and martial artists (small-scale training)...
Article
An influential series of studies have argued that young children are unable to use landmark information to reorient. However, these studies have used artificial experimental environments that may lead to an underestimation of the children's ability. We tested whether young children could reorient using landmarks in an ecologically valid setting. Ch...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Location-aware systems have traditionally left mobility to the user through carrying, supporting and manipulating the device itself. This design choice has limited the scale and style of device to corresponding weight and form constraints. This paper presents a project introducing school children to location aware systems. We observed that it is ha...
Conference Paper
This paper shows how spatialised sound can be used to guide users around a located gaming environment. Thus far, despite growing interest in delivering location-relevant media information to users, accurate delivery of virtual spatialised sound using limited-processing portable devices, such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), has not yet been e...
Article
In the majority of cases, objects or data relevant to the task can be identified in advance. During the actual visualization, the viewer's visual system must focus its attention on these objects and data in order to complete the task. While focusing on these objects, the human viewer fails to notice other large parts of the scene. It is this featur...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper analyses the stages and circumstances for immersion based on quantitative and qualitative feedback from 700 people who took part in a three week long public trial of a location-based audio drama. Ratings of enjoyment, immersion and how much history came alive all scored highly and people often spent up to an hour in the experience. A mod...
Article
In this sketch we describe two novel location aware interactive applications; Riot! 1831, an interactive historical play, and Moulinex, an interactive ambient sound piece. Both of the applications discussed have the common trait of using GPS to calculate the user's location which is then used to control the participant's interaction with the applic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we describe the situation and factors that lead to "Magic Moments" in mediascape experiences and discuss the implications for how to design these magic moments without them appearing contrived. The distinctive feature of mediascapes is their link to the physical environment and we introduce a framework for Experience Design and descr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The perception of a virtual environment depends on the user and the task the user is currently perform- ing in that environment. Models of the human vi- sual system can thus be exploited to significantly reduce computational time when rendering high fi- delity images, without compromising the perceived visual quality. This paper considers how an im...
Conference Paper
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Cater et al. showed that conspicuous objects in a scene that would normally attract the viewer's attention are ignored if they are not relevant to the task at hand [Cater et al. 2002]. This failure of the human to see unattended items in a scene, is known as inattentional blindness [Mack and Rock 1998]. In their experiments, viewers were presented...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes the process and lessons learned from the design of a location based audio drama.
Article
The perceived quality of computer graphics imagery depends on the accuracy of the rendered frames, as well as the capabilities of the human visual system. Fully detailed, high fidelity frames still take many minutes even hours to render on today's computers. The human eye is physically incapable of capturing a moving scene in full detail. We sense...
Article
Full-text available
A major challenge in Virtual Reality is to achieve realism at interactive rates. However, the computational time required for realistic image synthesis is significant, precluding such realism in real-time. This paper demonstrates a concept that may be exploited to reduce rendering times substantially without compromising perceived visual quality in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The complexity of most virtual environments prevents them being rendered in real time even on modern graphics hardware. Knowledge of the visual system of the user viewing the environment may be used to significantly reduce image computation times. In this paper, we demonstrate the principle of Change Blindness, a major side effect of brief visual d...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The perceived quality of computer graphics imagery depends on the accuracy of the rendered frames, as well as the capabilities of the human visual system. Fully detailed, high fidelity frames still take many minutes even hours to render on today's computers. The human eye is physically incapable of capturing a moving scene in full detail. We sense...
Article
Despite the ready availability of modern high performance graphics cards, the complexity of the scenes being modelled and the realism required of the images means that rendering high fidelity computer images is still simply not possible in a reasonable, let alone real-time. Knowing that it is a human that will be looking at the resultant images can...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The computer graphics industry, and in particular those involved with films, games and virtual reality, continue to demand more realistic computer generated images. Despite the ready availability of modem high performance graphics cards, the complexity of the scenes being modeled and the high fidelity required of the images means that rendering suc...
Article
xperiment involved 45 images rendered in Radiance. 4 We asked a group of six "judges" to give a short description of the scenes. Their descriptions enabled us to define, for each scene, several aspects that are termed "Central Interest" aspects: those aspects that were mentioned by at least three of the judges. Central interest aspects tended to co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There are two major influences on human visual attention: bottom-up and top-down processing. Bottom-up processing is the automatic direction of gaze to lively or colourful objects as determined by low-level vision. In contrast, top-down processing is consciously directed attention in the pursuit of predetermined goals or tasks. Previous work in per...
Article
A major challenge in virtual reality is to achieve realistic images at interactive rates. However, the computation time required for real-istic image synthesis is significant, which precludes such realism in real time. One possible way of producing perceptually high-fidelity images in reasonable times is to exploit the "flaws" in the human eye, for...
Article
In this sketch we describe two novel location aware interactive applications; Riot! 1831, an interactive historical play, and Moulinex, an interactive ambient sound piece. Both of the applications discussed have the common trait of using GPS to calculate the user's location which is then used to control the participant's interaction with the applic...

Citations

... However, this improvement was not statistically significant for which the sample size needs to be increased. In [6], different treatment protocols were compared to determine the adequate treatment time. These protocols result in almost similar improvement in the visual acuity. ...
... Our long-range study found that after an initial flurry of activity, VR headset use by home users tails off significantly (see also Fiennes, 2019;Green et al., 2020). ...
... To truly immerse participants, considerable artistic skill is required. Design fictions may be presented using a range of media -including tangible prototypes (for example, Sturdee et al., 2017); technical documentation (Lindley and Coulton, 2016); paper-based media (for example, comics, newspapers and magazines) ; digital imagery and videos (Lindley and Potts, 2014); and virtual environments (Green et al., 2019). ...
... The lack of empirical research demonstrating LSW that utilizes the potential of digital technologies is disappointing. Digital media is increasingly used by children and young people to communicate with each other and those around them, and is therefore likely to increase feelings of empowerment during LSW (Grasso et al., 2013;Gray et al., 2020;Hammond & Cooper, 2013). There is some indication that using digital technologies to deliver LSW may offer new ways to address the need to work with older CYPCE and enable a more longitudinal method of undertaking LSW (Hammond & Cooper, 2013). ...
... We run Welch's T-test [35,36] with the α = 0.05 significance level to validate this hypothesis. The Welch T-test for Phase 1 (January 2019) has the degree of freedom DF = 7.24 and results in p = 0.96, p(x ≤ T ) = 0.51, where the test statistic T = 0.04 is in the 95% critical value accepted range of [−2.34, 2.34]. ...
... Recent work within SIGCHI has focused on understanding how we can better support individuals and groups within CW. Gray at al. [65] have worked on designing technologies for foster youth by creating a new digital memory box for fostered and adopted children to create and store their childhood memories. Badillo-Urquiola et al. [12] have focused on addressing online safety within foster families by identifying the challenges foster parents face as they mediate teen technology use in the home. ...
... The turn toward using Interactive Digital Narrative (IDN) to explore complex subjects has cooccurred as storytellers and audiences have returned their attention to Virtual Reality (VR). The confluence of these trends draws attention to how non-fiction practitioners can use the technical and aesthetic affordances of VR to create knowledge about complex subjects through factual narratives and other non-fiction (Nash, 2018;Rose, 2018;Bevan et al., 2019;Fisher, 2019;Bohrod, 2021). Of particular focus in this paper is the idea that through an embodied, immersive, and interactive discourse within a factual IDN, that presented knowledge about a subject may be accepted and incorporated into the life of an interactor. ...
... Zoos are increasingly providing non-human animals (hereon animals) access to computer systems for entertainment or enrichment purposes, to measure their cognition and to monitor them. These computer systems are mostly given to non-human primates (hereon primates); for example, researchers have made music systems for apes and monkeys [47,48,58], video systems for white-faced sakis [17], projection games for orangutans [62] and food finding puzzles for gorillas [14]. ...
... Still, for computer-enabled devices used in zoos, children are typically not involved in this process. Instead, it is commonplace for adults to be consulted exclusively -usually, the animals' keepers [30,62], zoo education staff without technical expertise, and/or adult visitors [33,77,78]. While input from these adults is vital, in that they are experts in animal welfare, interaction design, and other fundamental aspects of zoo context, there is a noticeable lack of a child's perspective in designing educational experiences. ...
... Without encouragement, a person living with dementia can become increasingly locked within their own universe and lose connection with others and the world around them (ibid). Products and environments that stimulate the senses have been found to soothe, engage and support pleasurable experience and so enhance the wellbeing of people in the mid to late stages of the disease (Bennett, Hinder et al. 2016, Treadaway and Kenning 2016, Jakob and Collier 2017. Digital technologies such as music players, sensory e-textiles, interactive objects that respond to movement or emit light, can be incorporated into environments and can be programmed for individual preferences, such as choice of music or favourite colour (Treadaway and Kenning 2016). ...