Kimberly Thigpen Tart's research while affiliated with National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and other places

Publications (11)

Article
Full-text available
Environ Health Perspect 124(4):A59 (2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1611410 In the original article, the URL for the report titled “The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment” was http://www.globalchange.gov/health-assessment. In this erratum, the authors provide the URL for the final version...
Chapter
Full-text available
Vulnerability Varies Over Time and Is Place-Specific Key Finding 1: Across the United States, people and communities differ in their exposures, their inherent sensitivity, and their adaptive capacity to respond to and cope with climate change related health threats [Very High Confidence]. Vulnerability to climate change varies across time and locat...
Chapter
Full-text available
Key Finding 1: Many people exposed to climate-related or weather-related disasters experience stress and serious mental health consequences. Depending on the type of the disaster, these consequences include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and general anxiety, which often occur at the same time [Very High Confidence]. The majority...

Citations

... Older workers and those with underlying health conditions or disease risk factors are particularly vulnerable to injury and illness during and following extreme events (Silver, 2020). For example, employees that use some medications and/or are chronic disease sufferers are less likely to be able to work safety at elevated temperatures (Dyal et al., 2020;Gamble et al., 2016). The needs of employees with limited English-language skill or disabilities must be considered as part of inclusive emergency and disaster planning. ...
... Climate change threatens health in a myriad of ways, including increases in vector-and waterborne diseases, decreases in air and water quality, and impacts from more extreme weather events such as droughts, floods, and hurricanes. One of the most apparent health risks stemming from climate change is increasingly frequent and longer periods of more severe extreme heat (Balbus et al. 2016). The relationship between human health and extreme heat is well-established (Astrom et al., 2003), and there is strong evidence to suggest that climate change will increase the global number of heat-related deaths (Hales et al., 2014). ...
... This significantly increased risk of death from heat-related symptoms for those with mental disorders (118), particularly schizophrenia/schizotypal (119), psychosis, depression, dementia and substance abuse (69,118,120), may be due in part to side effects of psychotropic medication (medicines that treat a person's mental state). Prescription medications to treat mental illness can sometimes impair the body's ability to regulate temperature (thermoregulation), placing individuals taking such medications at increased risk of more severe heat-related symptoms or death at high temperatures, (92,118,121) particularly for the elderly (118,122). Such exacerbated heat stress may also worsen the symptoms of mental illness. ...
... Alonso and Renard [23] studied the physiological and socioeconomic vulnerabilities to heat waves in Lyon. Everyone can be vulnerable to heat waves, but some groups of individuals are at greater risk [24]. The highest-risk groups are elderly people (>75 years), particularly those with pre-existing diseases, people with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, children, and infants, as their bodies have a reduced ability to adapt to heat compared to adults [25]. ...
... 2). 32 Strategies must be tailored to communities and enhanced in those without sufficient resources to support adequate preparation. ...
... Addressing the multifaceted problems posed by climate change requires engaging with communities who are directly and disproportionately affected. This requires multidisciplinary and multisectoral partnerships, collaborative data integration, and rigorous training to equip the next generation of environmental health leaders with diverse and complementary skills [30][31][32][33][34][35][36], all hallmarks of SRP. ...