Kent McAdoo's research while affiliated with University of Nevada, Reno and other places

Publications (13)

Article
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Cattle grazed a cheatgrass-dominated pasture during the fall dormant period for four years (2006-2009) and were provided a protein nutrient supplement to improve their distribution, uptake of dry feed and production performance. Cheatgrass standing crop was reduced by 43 percent to 80 percent each year, and cattle weight and body condition score in...
Article
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Wildfire is a major concern in the Intermountain West. Fuels management can lower the potential for negative wildfire effects. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.), a nonnative annual grass, invasion has resulted in a buildup of highly flammable fine fuels that promote frequent wildfire. Removal of cheatgrass standing crop through targeted, prescriptive...
Article
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We measured the response of perennial pepperweed ( Lepidium latifolium) canopy cover and stem numbers to 30 treatment combinations that included physical or chemical mowing, and application of a systemic herbicide to the regrowth of perennial pepperweed. Mowing treatment, regrowth herbicide treatment, and their interaction each influenced the respo...
Article
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Since 1961, The Nevada Youth Range Camp (NYRC) has provided a week-long camping and instructional experience for high school-age youth from across Nevada and occasionally Northeastern California. Nevada Youth Range Camp goals focus on relationships between people and rangeland. Campers learn that land managers need information about plants, wildlif...
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Workshop V, 'Wildfire Rehabilitation and Restoration' of the Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts Conference and Workshops was held in Reno, Nevada, in December 2008. Mike Zielinski presented case studies of habitat restoration within the Winnemucca District, in which the successful seeding of perennial grasses was essential in reducin...
Article
Public land management agency standard policy has been to delay grazing on burned areas for a minimum of 2 yr on both seeded and unseeded areas. This 2-yr grazing moratorium has not been specifically validated by research. Study objectives were to investigate seeding and not seeding as well as grazing and not grazing immediately after a fire. The s...
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Since settlement by Euro-Americans, many changes have occurred on the Great Basin landscape. Examining land-use in the context of history provides a reference point for land managers. An increasing number of scientists and bioregional historians have recently indicated that active vegetation management of landscapes, particularly where wildland fir...
Article
Full-text available
It is obvious that the diverse array of wildlife species using sagebrush habitats have a similarly wide range of habitat requirements. Vegetation management for biological diversity (“biodiversity”) on a landscape scale should take these diverse habitat requirements into consideration. Management for any one species may or may not provide the habit...

Citations

... For instance, heavier grazing pressure may be warranted in the annual grass community state to achieve desired fuel alterations (see Diamond et al. 2009 ;Stephenson et al. this issue ). This may be achieved with fall grazing as this has limited impacts on perennial bunchgrasses ( Schmelzer et al. 2014 ). Differences in grazing effects on fuel characteristics among community states need to be recognized in fuel management plans. ...
... This fact sheet, addressing the use of livestock to reduce wildfires, is the second of three fact sheets about the 2006 wildfires in northeastern Nevada. The other two deal with wildfire and land-use history (McAdoo et al. 2007a) and how to rehabilitate fireimpacted areas (McAdoo et al. 2007b). ...
... This is the second in a series of two fact sheets. The first (McAdoo and others 2003) discusses wildlife habitat diversity in sagebrush habitats. Both fact sheets are based primarily on a paper by McAdoo and others (in press). ...
... Mechanical mowing of perennial pepperweed plants at the bud-to-early-flowering stage and retreating the regrowth later that growing season (at the bud growth stage) with a systemic herbicide is an effective control method in California DiTomaso 2004 and2006). Recent research in Nevada (Schultz et al., 2014) found that Telar (chlorsulfuron) was equally effective, with or without a mowing Summary: A perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) community with a residual component of creeping wildrye (Leymus triticoides) was mechanically or chemically mowed and the regrowth treated with three different herbicides individually or as tank mixes. Creeping wildrye that was mechanically mowed when at the boot stage tended to have less cover and lower vigor than creeping wildrye in untreated plots. ...
... One drawback of aerial seeding is the high potential of low seed-to-soil contact, resulting in low seeded species [31]. Great Basin native bunchgrass and forb recovery is not enhanced by aerial seeding after a fire [107]. Native species are inhibited when nonnative grasses, like A. cristatum, are included in the seed mix [40]. ...
... This is the first of three fact sheets that address the 2006 wildfires in northeastern Nevada. The other two deal with the use of livestock for wildfire reduction (McAdoo et al. 2007a) and how to rehabilitate fire-impacted areas (McAdoo et al. 2007b). ...
... We started experimenting with native/introduced seed mixes nearly 3 decades ago to hedge our bets on above and below average precipitation years, [36][37][38][39][40] and others have also reported on this approach to restore or rehabilitate degraded rangelands. 7 , 41-45 Climate patterns throughout the Great Basin are highly variable and erratic, 46 and this erratic unpredictable pattern has significant impact on germination, emergence, and seedling establishment of seeded and nonseeded plant species. ...