Kelly L. Denit's research while affiliated with University of Miami and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
Atlantic blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) and sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) larvae were collected from 10monthly cruises (June–October 2003 and 2004) across the Straits of Florida to test (1) whether growth differed between the more productive western region near the Florida shelf, and the less productive eastern region toward the Bahamas, and...
Article
The Atlantic blue marlin Makaira nigricans larvae were collected from Exuma Sound, Bahamas and the Straits of Florida over three summers (2000–2002). Sagittal otoliths were extracted and read under light microscopy to determine relationships between standard length (LS) and age for larvae from each year and location. Otolith growth trajectories wer...
Article
Full-text available
Newly recruited juvenile gray snapper Lutjanus griseus were collected each fall for two consecutive years (2000 and 2001) from sites in Florida and North Carolina. Spawning, settlement, and growth patterns were compared across sites based on otolith microstructure. Larval otolith growth trajectories were generally similar for larvae from different...
Article
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Miami, 2002. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 49-55).

Citations

... Growth data from Gray Snapper have also been reported in multiple previous studies (Johnson et al. 1994, Burton 2001, Allman and Grimes 2002, Fischer et al. 2005 of the range of the species (i.e., similar growth curve parameters). However, a previous study on the Atlantic coast of North America noted differences in growth of juveniles driven by latitude (Denit and Sponaugle 2004), and Andrade and Santos (2019) implied that at the edge of the species' range, variation in growth might be driven by phenotypic plasticity in the face of water temperature extremes. In this context, an age and growth function generated from known-aged individuals in the western GOM would more reliably allow for estimates of age projected backwards onto fishery data sets (e.g., estimates of age based on observed fish lengths) such as the extensive fishery-dependent and fishery-independent data possessed by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). ...
... The mean instantaneous growth coefficient K was 0.105, comparable to that of larval blue marlin (Makaira nigricans, K = 0.085-0.128) from the Bahamas and Straits of Florida [79] and to larval sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus, K = 0.144) from the nGoM [80]. In contrast, the larval growth coefficient of western Atlantic snappers such as schoolmaster (Lutjanus apodus, K = 0.047) and mutton snapper (Lutjanus analis, K = 0.044) are considerably lower [81]. ...
... Beyond total carbon ingested, a proxy for energy intake, feeding success is also modulated by the capacity of ingested prey taxa to provide the suite of essential nutrients, such as amino acids and fatty acids, that are necessary for proper larval development (Rønnestad et al., 1999;Sargent et al., 1999). The larval prey field is composed of various taxa characterized by differences in potential to fulfill requirements relative to energy and essential nutrient intake, which likely explains why several larval fish species have been shown to selectively consume prey taxa that result in their optimal growth (Robert et al., 2009;Sponaugle et al., 2010;Murphy et al., 2013). These considerations make it important to identify larval fish prey to the lowest taxonomic resolution possible. ...
... Gray Snapper (also known as Mangrove Snapper) are found in the estuarine and marine waters of the western Atlantic Ocean from North Carolina to Brazil, including the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and Bermuda (Starck and Schroeder 1971;Rutherford et al. 1989b;Andrade and Santos 2019). Larval Gray Snapper settle out of their planktonic stage into estuarine seagrass beds, mangroves, or oyster reefs (Allman and Grimes 2002;Denit and Sponaugle 2004) where they reside until subadult or adult life stages. Adults are thought to move offshore into coral or rocky reef habitats where they aggregate to spawn in summer months during the new (Starck and Schroeder 1971;Manooch and Matheson 1984;Domeier et al. 1996) or full moon (Claro and Lindeman 2003). ...