Kelly Amanda Train's research while affiliated with Ryerson University and other places

Publications (6)

Chapter
The concept of the “breadwinner role” became prominent between 1790 and 1865 in the west under industrialization. Until this period, both men's and women's participation in production were considered essential to family survival. In agrarian societies, the lines separating the gender division of labor were often blurred. With the onset of industria...
Chapter
Household labor largely remains “women's work” and the responsibility of women, regardless of women's increased involvement in the paid workforce. Men in the early twenty-first century are increasingly involved in direct interaction with and care of their children, and perform some household duties such as cleaning, cooking, and so on, as well as “...
Chapter
Judaism, as a patriarchal religion, traditionally had gender relations that revolve around men's superiority and women's inferiority. Under Jewish law, men's role in the community was traditionally to devote themselves to religious study. From ancient times through the nineteenth century, Rabbinic scholars rationalized to women that they were “exem...
Chapter
As long as marriage has existed, couples have sought divorce. In hunting and gathering societies, both women men had the right to end a marriage. With the emergence of early farming societies, the erosion of women's rights included the elimination of women's right to divorce. Until the nineteenth century, divorce laws worldwide were governed by rel...
Article
I have never experienced antisemitism. My problem has been that Ashkenazi Jews have failed to acknowledge and recognize me as a Jew. In 2009, the Indian-Jewish community in Toronto celebrated the thirtieth anniversary of Congregation BINA (Bene Israel North America), the first and only Indian-Jewish prayer congregation in Toronto. Founded in 1979 b...
Article
This article explores the North African Jewish community's establishment of Or Haemet Sephardic School as a response to the forced “Ashkenazification” of Sephardic students in the Orthodox Jewish day school system. The establishment of the school signifies the North African Jewish community's refusal and resistance to an essentialist Jewish identit...

Citations

... Current studies focus mainly on its negative implications for individuals, such as feelings of invisibility, lack of belonging and sapping of mental and spiritual energy (Franklin 2004). The work of Train (2013), who examined the incorporation of Jewish MENA immigrants into the Canadian Jewish community in the late 1950s, points out the significance of microaggression in the marginalizing of a minority culture and the weakening of its ethnic identity. By using selected curricula, channeling MENA children into separate classes and producing knowledge that reflected only the traditions of Orthodox Jews, the Canadian Jewish leadership signaled to MENA Jews that Ashkenazi religious identity was the 'authentic' Jewish identity, and that their Sephardic culture and identity were 'inferior' and 'uncivilized'. ...