Kelly A. Brennan's research while affiliated with State University of New York College at Brockport and other places

Publications (15)

Article
A study of 80 couples (mean age 24) examined the impact of attachment patterns on reactions to manipulated positive or negative feedback, ostensibly from partners. As expected, individuals high in attachment anxiety reported more negative mood and the least indifference to partner feedback. In addition, those high in attachment anxiety reported mor...
Article
Two lines of research on adult attachment have emerged; both are based on Bowlby and Ainsworth's attachment theory, which in turn relies on evolutionary theory. Investigators in one tradition use the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) to assess “state of mind with respect to attachment.” The AAI has been validated primarily by its ability to predict...
Article
Attachment theory was explored as a means of understanding the origins of personality disorders. We investigated whether adult attachment styles and personality disorders share a common underlying structure, and how both kinds of variables relate to family background factors, including parental death, parental divorce, and current representations o...
Article
Full-text available
The authors examined attachment-style differences in reliance on partner feedback to maintain self-esteem. First, they argue that those people who value relational sources of self-esteem are more open to and affected by partner feedback than those people who derive self-esteem from competence-based sources; these differences correspond to working m...
Article
In light of an increasing ethnic diversity in the US, we sought to investigate how and whether cultural variables impact the quality of dating relationships by comparing couples from either the same or a different ethnic group. In a small sample of young dating couples, we examined motives for initiating their relationships, relationship satisfacti...
Article
Recent research has suggested that adult attachment style, an orientation to relationships thought to be determined by child-hood relationships with parents and subsequent experiences with important attachment figures, affects the experience of romantic love. Several hypotheses were generated regarding attachment-style differences in affect-regulat...
Article
In her four-fold model of attachment, Bartholomew (1990) distinguished two socially avoidant attachment styles, fearful and dismissing, in terms of self-esteem and social avoidance. Unfortunately, her measure of social avoidance (sociability) cannot discriminate sociability from shyness, an important aspect of social avoidance. The association of s...
Article
Hazan and Shaver (1987) reported that adult attachment styles do not seem to be influenced by parental divorce, which is puzzling because parents with insecure attachment styles should frequently cause their children to have insecure styles (Main, Kaplan, & Cassidy, 1985; Ricks, 1985), and such parents should also be more likely to divorce. The par...
Article
Hazan and Shaver have identified three adult attachment styles corresponding to the infant-mother attachment patterns observed by Ainsworth and associates in the first year of life: secure, avoidant, and anxious-ambivalent. These three styles are related to a wide variety of close relationship processes and outcomes. To date, however; little resear...
Article
Bartholomew's (1990) four-category typology of adult attachment styles was compared with Hazan & Shaver's (1987) three-category typology in terms of three substantive issues. First, the same two dimensions were found to underlie both typologies, and the Bartholomew and Hazan & Shaver measures corresponded as predicted. Second, there were no gender...

Citations

... Moreover, although in-person and relationship/contextual variability has been indicated in adult attachment styles, these have been found to relate predominantly to romantic relationships rather than to parental relationships whose representations are thought to be more stable over time , thus confirming the suitability of attachment style measures to the study of parent-child relationships. Also, while commonly measured categorically, psychometric evidence indicates that attachment styles are better captured by dimensional measures (Brennan et al., 1998) which assess an individual's degree of attachment-related avoidance and attachment-related anxiety. Attachmentrelated avoidance, characterised by a tendency to deactivate the attachment system resulting in discomfort with dependency or closeness in relationships (Shaver and Mikulincer, 2002) has been linked with less sensitive, responsive, and supportive parental behaviour (Berlin et al., 2011), less constructive conflict behaviour from mothers but not fathers (Feeney, 2006), and greater parenting stress (Kor et al., 2012). ...
... Individuals with an anxious attachment style have low self-worth, a fear of abandonment, and use hyperactivating strategies (e.g., proximity seeking) to manage distress (Bartholomew, 1990;Cobb & Davila, 2009;Moran et al., 2008). As such, they likely engage in reassurance seeking with close others, as a means of determining their self-worth and security in their relationships (Brennan & Carnelley, 1999). This finding augments the literature by offering additional support regarding the relationship between an IWM reflecting a high level of concern surrounding relationships, in particular a fear of abandonment or rejection, and ERS. ...
... However, the initial tool was mainly used with college students' samples, but the reliability of the measure decreased when the scale was used to assess loneliness among other populations, such as the elderly [77]; for this reason, we used version 3 of the scale. Most research on loneliness has been based on the UCLA which has become the "standard" scale in the area (see discussion by Shaver and Brennan [78]). Cronbach's alpha for the UCLA score in the present study was 0.89. ...
... Qian, 2005). Disapproval and receiving less support from friends, family, and the public is associated with lower relationship satisfaction in DISC couples (Shibazaki & Brennan, 1998) and constitutes a risk factor for DISC relationships. ...
... Males were also more fearful-avoidant and dismissive in relationships than females, with both family members and friends. These results are in accordance with previous findings on gender differences in attachment (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991;Duggan & Brennan, 1994). Authority ranking was higher for men's relations than for women's, whereas equality matching in relationships was higher for women, and lower for men. ...
... The major finding related to Hypothesis 2 was a significant relationship between secure attachment, gender, and career satisfaction, although no significant interaction effects were found to be significant. One of the novel findings from this study relates to the positive and significant relationship between insecure-dismissing attachment and career satisfaction, but the lack of an interaction effect with gender, although different than what has been reported in Western cultures, does find support in cross-cultural research not based in Western, more individualistic cultures Previous research, has reported significant gender differences in attachment patterns (Ardenghi et al., 2020;Brennan et al., 1991;Monteoliva et al., 2012), with men exhibiting greater levels of insecure-dismissing attachment. Yet, research from non-Western cultures suggests that this distinction may not represent a cross-culturally valid finding (Schmitt, 2003). ...
... Thus, in the context of relationship science, drawing closer to valued social networks following adverse events (relationally based or otherwise) has potentially less to do with changes in personality and more to do with immediate need-fulfillment. Furthermore, many of these theoretical models suggest that motivations to socially reconnect are contingent on dispositional traits to begin with (Brennan & Bosson, 1998;Downey & Feldman, 1996;Girme et al., 2018;Leary et al., 1995;Murray et al., 2008;Plusnin et al., 2018;Simpson et al., 1996), such as whether people perceive close others as a reliable outlet for safety or a potential source of harm. When people are high in dispositional traits associated high interpersonal trust, they are motivated to seek out and rely on their interpersonal networks in times of need (Murray et al., 2006;Simpson, 2007). ...
... The R-AAS consists of 18 items that are answered on a 5-point Likert scale, with higher scores reflecting stronger closeness, dependence, or anxiety. Closeness and Dependence were seen as an (inverse) measure of avoidant attachment from other measures and Anxiety may be viewed in line with anxious attachment of other attachment scales [45]. In the current study, all subscales demonstrated sufficient internal consistency reflected in α = 0.76 and ω = 0.77 for Closeness, α/ω = 0.86 for Dependence, and α/ω = 0.90 for Anxious Attachment, respectively. ...
... Various related constructs were chosen to confirm the concurrent validity of the RRS, or its associations to measures of theoretically related constructs (Cronbach and Meehl, 1955). Prior research has indicated that romantic relationship quality is positively correlated with extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness and negatively correlated with neuroticism, although these correlations are not always detected, and their magnitude varies somewhat with report method (Shaver and Brennan, 1992;Noftle and Shaver, 2006;Holland and Roisman, 2008). Although the literature on roommate relationship quality and personality is quite limited, one previous study also found a positive correlation between conscientiousness and relationship quality among college roommates (Kurtz and Sherker, 2003). ...