Keisha M. Cutright's research while affiliated with Duke University and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Consumers often desire to become better versions of themselves. Reflecting this interest in self-improvement, the marketplace offers consumers a wide range of products and services that promise to improve or better the consumer in some way. But, in a world with unlimited opportunities to spend one’s time and money, what influences whether consumers...
Article
Consumers have grown increasingly skeptical of brands, leaving managers in a dire search for novel ways to connect. The authors suggest that focusing on one’s relationships with competitors is a valuable, albeit unexpected, way for brands to do so. More specifically, the present research demonstrates that praising one’s competitor—via “brand-to-bra...
Article
To begin building an understanding of how thoughts about God influence consumer persuasion processes and outcomes, the current research explores how reminders of God affect consumer compliance with fear-based advertising. Results across seven studies demonstrate that when the concept of God is salient, consumer compliance and persuasion in response...
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Full-text available
Consumers often face situations in which their feelings of personal control are threatened. In such contexts, what role should products play in helping consumers pursue their goals (e.g., losing weight, maintaining a clean home)? Across five studies, we challenge the traditional view that low control is detrimental to effort and demonstrate that co...
Article
Religion is a powerful force in many people's lives, impacting decisions about life, death, and everything in between. It may be difficult, then, to imagine that something as seemingly innocuous as the usage of brand name products might influence individuals' commitment to religion. However, we demonstrate across 6 studies that when brands are a hi...
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New brand extensions can push a brand outside its typical boundaries. In this artietingcle, the authors argue that people's acceptance of such extensions depends on their feelings of control. Across several studies, the authors demonstrate that when feelings of personal control are low, consumers and managers seek greater structure in brands and th...
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How do consumers cope when it seems that they have no control over their outcomes in life? This research posits that consumers will seek greater structure in consumption—or the sense that everything is in its designated place. Moreover, it suggests that very simple boundaries in the environment offer a means for attaining this sense of structure. S...
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Consumers are often strongly motivated to view themselves as part of a legitimate and fair external system. Our research focuses on how individuals adopt distinct ways of defending their system when it is threatened and, in particular, how this is revealed in their consumption choices. We find that although individuals differ in how confident they...
Article
Are you type A or type B? An optimist or a pessimist? Intuitive or analytical? Consumers are motivated to learn about the self, but they may not always accept what they learn. This article explores how the desire for self-discovery leads people to seek but not necessarily accept the feedback they receive and the implications this has for consumptio...
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Three studies demonstrate how individual differences in confidence in the sociopolitical system interact with threats that engage the system justification motive to produce system defense. Following threat, participants low, but not high, in system confidence increasingly defended the system, by rejecting system change (Study 1) and preferring dome...
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Full-text available
We examine the conditions under which the distinct positive emotions of hope versus pride facilitate more or less fluid cognitive processing. Using individuals' naturally occurring time of day preferences (i.e., morning vs. evening hours), we show that specific positive emotions can differentially influence processing resources. We argue that speci...
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Full-text available
Are brands the "new religion"? Practitioners and scholars have been intrigued by the possibility, but strong theory and empirical evidence supporting the existence of a relationship between brands and religion is scarce. In what follows, we argue and demonstrate that religiosity is indeed related to "brand reliance," i.e., the degree to which consu...

Citations

... These articles consider everyday consumer aesthetics with a special focus on their transformative potential. The topics include everyday arenas such as basic consumer products, including electric kettles (Crolic et al. 2019) and picture frames (Jiang, Su, and Zhu 2019); the package design of commonplace products such as bottled waters (Dahl et al. 2019) or snack foods (Schnurr 2019); promotional materials consumers regularly encounter such as product displays (Koo, Oh, and Patrick 2019) or online promotions (Mourey and Elder 2019); and routine decisions such as the clothing one wears (Cutright, Srna, and Samper 2019). Together, these essays reveal the breadth of the influence of aesthetics. ...
... An additional practical implication of this research is that public sentiment should be paid enough attention to and properly guided in the context of COVID-19. Fear appeals have been widely used to address pressing public health issues and health protection issues, including AIDS prevention, smoking cessation and unhealthy eating habits (Wu and Cutright, 2018). However, when using fear messages in corporate propaganda or advertising, existing studies have failed to reach consistent conclusions. ...
... If elaboration would have yielded weaker persuasion, in contrast, then fast speech promotes persuasion. Specifically, since time to process information is limited when visual stimuli are sped up, we argue that consumers have less ability to thoughtfully consider the communicating messages in the videos, that is, less attentive focusing on the messages (i.e., low elaboration), compared to videos at a normal speed (high elaboration) [37,38]. Therefore, for video materials communicating climate change risks, the fast playback speed (i.e., low elaboration) may inhibit the information processing, leading to less formation of urgency perception. ...
... They may appreciate striving for the brand if they feel committed to the brand (Hollebeek, 2011). Although the principle of least effort seems to dominate service and customer relationship management literature, some studies show that customer effort does not always entail customer dissatisfaction (Cutright & Samper, 2014;Kivetz & Simonson, 2003). Some research highlights the logic of commitment, where customers' effort is a source of satisfaction. ...
... Consumers either proactively compensate for their unmet desire for control by resorting to external sources (such as choosing products that provide symbolic control; Friesen, Kay, Eibach, & Galinsky, 2014;Rutjens, van Harreveld, van der Pligt, Kreemers, & Noordewier, 2013) or by simply changing their own perception of the world to defend their inner structure (Kay et al., 2009). As examples of the former strategy, consumers may satisfy their desire for control by choosing products with clear boundaries (Keisha, 2012) and long-term utility (e.g., material goods over experiences; Tully, Hershfield, & Meyvis, 2015). As examples of the latter strategy, consumers may engage in beliefs in God (Kay et al., 2009) and perceive illusory patterns in noise (Whitson & Galinsky, 2008). ...
... A dividing line refers to a visual boundary that dictates where things belong (Cutright et al., 2013;Cutright, 2012;Hagerty, 1995;Thorndyke, 1981;Tversky, 1981). It has been widely used in page layouts and packaging designs. ...
... The present work examines how God salience changes consumer response to self-improvement products and identifies the process underlying it. While prior research often focuses on how God and religion influence behavior through shifting moral values (Cutright et al. 2014;Hyodo and Bolton 2021), self-regulation (Laurin et al. 2012;Rounding et al. 2012), risk perceptions (Kupor et al. 2015), and control (Khenfer et al. 2017), this research demonstrates that God salience influences behavior even among products that are equal on such dimensions, suggesting that there are multiple routes through which God influences behavior and a variety of domains in which it does so. ...
... We manipulated participants' self-construal by asking them to complete a study called "reading comprehension," in which they read a short description about "a trip to the city" and to count and write down the number of pronouns appearing in the text (Brewer & Gardner, 1996;Wu, Cutright, & Fitzsimons, 2011). The description of the trip to the city used either exclusively independent pronouns (e.g., I, me, my) or exclusively interdependent pronouns (e.g., we, our, us). ...
... Further, there may be individual differences in the effects of this increase. Studies have shown that motivational threats most typically cause a specific motivation among people who have relatively lower general levels of that particular motivation [33][34][35]. That is, threat or stress from the environment may make the motivation salient for everyone, although it will have a stronger effect for those with low chronic motivation, thus causing them to become close to those that have high levels of that motivation. ...
... Among them, the income of residents is the most important and direct economic factor. Because income constitutes the economic basis of residents' consumption demand, the amount of income directly affects the level of residents' consumption expenditure and the proportion of all kinds of goods or services consumption, namely, consumption structure [9]. Industrial structure and consumption structure promote each other. ...