Keira C. Stockdale's research while affiliated with Tourism Saskatoon and other places

Publications (23)

Article
The present study examined the predictive properties of three youth forensic measures-the Violence Risk Scale-Youth Version (VRS-YV), Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and the Structured Assessment of Protective Factors-Youth Version (SAPROF-YV)-in a diverse court-adjudicated sample of 257 youth referred for assessment and in...
Article
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Purpose of Review We review the issues, controversies, and main findings from the sexual violence risk assessment literature with Indigenous men. An argument is presented for the incorporation of structured and validated risk assessment measures as part of a comprehensive assessment to inform risk management and the prevention of sexual violence....
Article
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The current investigation was a prospective field validity study examining the discrimination and calibration properties of a general risk-need tool (Level of Service Inventory–Saskatchewan Youth Edition [LSI-Sk]) in a diverse sample of 284 court adjudicated youths, rated by their youth workers on the measure and followed up an average of 9.3 years...
Article
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The Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI) is one of the most frequently used tools to assess criminogenic risk–need in justice-involved individuals. Meta-analytic research demonstrates strong predictive accuracy for various recidivism outcomes. In this exploratory study, we applied machine learning (ML) algorithms (decision trees, ran...
Article
General criminal attitudes have been well established as a dynamic risk factor for the origin, maintenance, and continuation of criminal behavior. Guided by the risk–need–responsivity (RNR) framework, this study examined self-reported change on a measure of general criminal attitudes in a sample of incarcerated men who participated in a sexual offe...
Preprint
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Comprehensive reply to DeMatteo et al. 2020 in Psychology, Public Policy & Law provides evidence for the reliability and validity of the PCL-R in the assessment of risk for institutional violence.
Article
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Purpose of review: We provide a review and synthesis of the sexual offense treatment change literature with implications for dynamic sexual violence risk assessment and management. An argument is presented for the need for a dynamic approach in research and practice, and that for change to be prognostic, such changes need to be risk relevant and t...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of the assessment and treatment of adult violent offenders, theory, research, and clinical practice. The topic of coverage features general violence, specifically, crimes against the person that may involve any physical, threatened, or psychological harm, excluding sexually motivated crimes or intimate partner viol...
Article
The present study examined the convergent and predictive validity of the Jesness Inventories (JI) in a sample of 138 juvenile offenders, completed in the course of routine service delivery. JI profiles were compared with ratings on three standardized forensic clinical scales: the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory, Psychopathy Checkli...
Article
The present study was a psychometric examination of Violence Risk Scale-Sexual Offender version (VRS-SO; Wong, S., Olver, M. E., Nicholaichuk, T. P., & Gordon, A. (200334. Wong, S., Olver, M. E., Nicholaichuk, T. P., & Gordon, A. (2003). The violence risk scale: Sexual offender version (VRS-SO). Saskatoon: Regional Psychiatric Centre and University...
Article
Full-text available
The Violence Risk Scale-Youth Version (VRS-YV; S. Wong, Lewis, Stockdale, & Gordon, 2004-2011) is a risk assessment and treatment planning tool for youths designed to assess violence risk, identify dynamic risk factors or treatment targets, and evaluate changes in risk from treatment or other change agents. We examined the psychometric properties o...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of the Level of Service (LS) scales, their predictive accuracy and group-based differences in risk/need, across 128 studies comprising 151 independent samples and a total of 137,931 offenders. Important potential moderators were examined including ethnicity, gender, LS scale variant, geographic region, and...
Article
The present investigation examined the predictive accuracy of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI) for youth and adult recidivism in a Canadian sample of 167 youths (93 males, 74 females) charged with serious offenses who received psychological services from a community mental health outpatient clinic. Youths were followed...
Article
The failure of offenders to complete psychological treatment can pose significant concerns, including increased risk for recidivism. Although a large literature identifying predictors of offender treatment attrition has accumulated, there has yet to be a comprehensive quantitative review. A meta-analysis of the offender treatment literature was con...
Article
The present study investigated the predictive accuracy of the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV; A. E. Forth, D. S. Kosson, & R. D. Hare, 2003) for youth and adult recidivism, with respect to gender, ethnicity, and age, in a sample of 161 Canadian young offenders who received psychological services from an outpatient mental health facil...
Article
Empirical research concerning the reliability and predictive validity of the juvenile psychopathy construct, as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV; Forth et al, 2003) is reviewed. The results of an updated meta-analysis (k = 38) investigating the interrater reliability of the PCL: YV are presented, along with an examinati...
Article
The current investigation is a meta-analysis of the predictive accuracy of three well-known forensic instruments used to appraise risk with young offenders: youth adaptations of the Level of Service Inventory and Psychopathy Checklist and the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk for Youth. Through several avenues, 49 potentially suitable publishe...

Citations

... Further factors preventing a shared understanding of, and contributing to contention in relation to, DP include pockets of research cultures which are publicly polarised and competitive rather than consultative and collegiate (DeMatteo et al., 2020;Olver et al., 2020); a neglect of data from practitioner and lived target/victim experience in favour of laboratory simulations (eg Buckels, Jones, & Paulhus, 2013); and a generally siloed approach to data gathering and discussion, despite evidence of experience and research into people of DP in many fields such as leadership (Ashforth, 1994;Lipman-Blumen, 2005b;Palmen, Kolthoff, & Derksen, 2021); the military (Erickson, Shaw, Murray, & Branch, 2015;Harms, Spain, & Hannah, 2011); fixated threat/stalking (Jung, Himmen, Velupillai, & Buro, 2021;Miller & Smolter, 2011); religion (Dale & Alpert, 2007); forensic psychology and psychiatry (Firestone, Bradford, Greenberg, & Serran, 2000); non-forensic psychology and psychiatry (Falkenbach, Balash, Tsoukalas, Stern, & Lilienfeld, 2018); intimate partner violence, including coercive control and also the impact on children (Katz, 2019;Katz et al., 2019;Lehmann, Simmons, & Pillai, 2012;Stark, 2009;Stark & Hester, 2019); paedophilia and ephebophilia (Dillien, Brazil, Sabbe, & Goethals, 2021;Turner, Rettenberger, Lohmann, Eher, & Briken, 2014); law enforcement and criminology (Chopin & Beauregard, 2019;Porter et al., 2000;Porter et al., 2003); the not-forprofit sector (Smith, McTier, & Pope, 2009); management consulting, law, accounting, and organisational psychology (Michalak & Ashkanasy, 2020b;Valentine, Fleischman, & Godkin, 2018); gender economics theory (Carbone & Black, 2020) and politics (Chen, Pruysers, & Blais, 2020;Heppell, 2011;Palmen, Derksen, & Kolthoff, 2018). Indeed, the many different fields working towards an understanding of dark personality made it difficult to know how to pitch this paper. ...
... For example, studies have reported low field reliability (Boccaccini, Turner, & Murrie, 2008;Murrie et al., 2009;Sturup et al., 2014), which has led some experts to caution against using the PCL-R in high-stakes adversarial settings (DeMatteo et al., 2020). In response to these concerns, Hare et al., 2020 andOlver et al., 2020 noted that the PCL-R's reliability (and hence utility) is comparable to alternate forensic assessment tools (see also DeMatteo & Olver, 2021). Other studies describe low inter-rater agreement between defense and prosecution assessments, giving rise to concerns about adversarial allegiance (Murrie, Boccaccini, Johnson, & Janke, 2008). ...
... For a better comparison of the studies, it is possible to perform a sorting by the type of recurrence they aim to predict. The sorting leads to four categories: general [22][23][24]28,31,32], sexual [31,32], violent [22,25,31] and all other recidivism. The last category includes studies that considered a specific type of crime [21] or referred only to males [27] or youth [26,29,30]. ...
... A further alternative that may have promise is the use of self-report inventories that either assess risk directly, such as the Level of Service Inventory-Self Report (LSI-SR; Motiuk et al., 1992) or that assess psychological constructs with risk relevance, including self-report measures of psychopathy (e.g., Hare Self-Report Psychopathy, Fourth Edition; Paulhus et al., 2015), criminal attitudes (e.g., Criminal Sentiments Scale-Modified; Simourd, 1997;Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles;Walters, 1995 ), or aggression, anger, and hostility (e.g., Aggression Questionnaire; Buss & Perry, 1992). Research supports the predictive properties of each of these measures for different recidivism outcomes as well as their convergent validity with established risk tools in general correctional samples (Folsom & Atkinson, 2007;Mossi ere et al., 2020;Olver et al., 2014;2021;Walters, 2012). These measures are each written at an elementary school level of reading comprehension, however, their psychometric properties with d/Deaf populations is as yet untested. ...
... The increasing amount of immersive virtual reality (iVR) technologies, applications, and research, since the emergence of consumer-oriented head-mounted displays (HMDs) in 2016, suggests that this technology will not only be a temporary trend but a new direction in human-computer interaction. It has been studied for its utilization in areas such as cognitive training [1,2], psychotherapy [3,4], rehabilitation [5,6], pain relief [7,8], laboratory safety training [9], museum exhibitions [10], heritage tourism [11], journalism [12], multidimensional data visualization [13], data analysis [14], urban planning [15], and education [16][17][18][19]. Our previous study [20] explored the educational use of iVR using qualitative methodology. ...
... La versión revisada y más reciente del JI-R está entre los instrumentos más utilizados en los sistemas de justicia juvenil de Estados Unidos y Canadá (Olver & Stockdale, 2016;Semel, 2016) -al lado del Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory -Adolescent -MMPI-A y del Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory -MACI (Pinsoneault & Ezzo, 2011). ...
... El juicio clínico estructurado (Monahan, 2008;Wong, Olver & Stockdale, 2009) sigue un procedimiento explicito para la identificación y evaluación de factores de riesgo, este procedimiento puede introducir puntuaciones, o no, para poder determinar la valoración final de la evaluación de riesgo (Pueyo & Redondo, 2007). ...
... This suggests that cognitive distortions measured by SoCCDQ are related with recidivism risk aspects that are not covered by Static-99. This is consistent with studies on Static-99 field validity which shown that its items are underpinned by three latent constructs: sexual criminality, general criminality, and youthful stranger aggression (Brouillette-Alarie, Babchishin, Helmus, Hanson, Murrie, 2021;olver et al., 2016). None of these domains concerns cognitive distortions thus it seems that SoCCDQ is related with aspect of sexual recidivism that are not measured by Static-99. ...
... In Chapter 1, the researcher refers to the development of several instruments, with which to measure risk and need, regarding the risk of general reoffending, violence, sexual violence, as well as the assessment of serious and chronic offending (Baglivio et al., 2017;Bonta & Andrews, 2017;Stockdale et al., 2014). As a general orientation, the researcher has decided to describe three popular instruments, adapted from the RNR, and used internationally, According to the literature (Andrews & Bonta, 2010;Cuervo et al., 2020;Dos Santos et al., 2016;Viglione 2019), the YLS/CMI is an extremely popular instrument for the general risk and need assessment of CCL. ...
... An example of a widely used actuarial tool for general offending is the Level of Service Inventory (LSI, or revised versions, see Andrews & Bonta, 2000). Overall, research has demonstrated reasonably good predictive accuracy for the LSI in both male and female populations (Geraghty, & Woodhams, 2015;Marshall et al., 2021;Olver et al., 2014), although there are also some reported disadvantages on the use of the LSI in females (see Salisbury et al., 2016). With respect to females who have committed sexual offenses, it was recently concluded in a study into 739 female sexual offenders that the commonly used actuarial tool, the STATIC-99R (Phenix et al., 2016) was not a valid predictor and thus not suitable for use in women (Marshall et al., 2020). ...