Keely Cheslack-Postava's research while affiliated with New York State Psychiatric Institute and other places

Publications (23)

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Full-text available
Purpose Modified labeling theory theorizes that when people acquire a label, personally held views about that label gain relevance and exert negative effects. We assessed whether being arrested reduces self-esteem to different extents based on the degree to which individuals hold stigmatizing beliefs about people with arrest records. Methods Adult...
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This descriptive case series retrospectively reviewed medical records from thirty-one previously healthy, war-fighting veterans who self-reported exposure to airborne hazards while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2003 and the present. They all noted new-onset dyspnea, which began during deployment or as a military contractor. Twenty-one sub...
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Objective: To assess occupational circumstances associated with adverse mental health among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A cross-sectional study examined responses to an online survey conducted among 2076 licensed healthcare workers during the first pandemic peak. Mental health (depression, anxiety, stress, and anger...
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Background The COVID-19 Pandemic resulted in high levels of fear, anxiety, and stress. People with pre-existing physical and mental health conditions may have been more affected by the sudden changes in daily habits during the initial months of global quarantine imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods We designed the Quarantine, Anxiety, and...
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It has been suggested that intergenerational transmission of risk for substance use disorder (SUD) manifests in the brain anatomy of substance naïve adolescents. While volume and shapes of subcortical structures (SSS) have been shown to be heritable, these structures, especially the pallidum, putamen, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus, have also b...
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Objective To examine associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and age specific insufficient sleep duration (ISD) in American youth. Methods Data from the 2016-2017 National Survey of Children's Health, a sample of 46,209 youth ages 6-17 were analyzed. The main outcome was sleep duration that did not meet the recent recommendations...
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A family history (FH+) of substance use disorder (SUD) increases an adolescent's risk for substance use initiation and progression. Greater impulsivity and reward seeking behavior is known to be associated with such risk. At the neurological level, dysfunction of cortico-striatal and cortico-limbic pathways have been proposed as contributors to the...
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Studies of the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and childhood/adolescent psychopathology in large samples examined one outcome only, and/or general (e.g., ‘psychological distress’) or aggregate (e.g., ‘any anxiety disorder’) measures of psychopathology. Thus, in the only representative sample of New York City public school 4th-12th...
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While both direct and indirect exposure to mass trauma are increasing in the United States, relatively little is known about the potential link between mass trauma and risk of panic disorder early in life. It is also unclear whether history of prior individual trauma increases risk of panic disorder even further among those with exposure to mass tr...
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Housing subsidies, including public housing and Sect. 8 vouchers, are key components of the social safety net, intended to promote family and child welfare. Studies evaluating the impact of housing subsidies on child and adolescent mental health, however, are generally inconclusive. This may reflect variation in the influence by type of subsidies t...
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Adolescents with a family history (FH+) of substance use disorder (SUD) are at a greater risk for SUD, suggested to be partly due to the transmission of behavioral impulsivity. We used a delay discounting task to compare impulsivity in decision-making and its associated brain functioning among FH + and FH- minority adolescents. Participants chose b...
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Background and Aims Cannabis use among parents may be increasing with legalization, but perception of associated risk has declined. The study investigated the association between cannabis legalization and cannabis use among adults with children in the home over time in the United States (US). Design A Difference‐in‐Difference approach was applied...
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Full-text available
Objective: To examine the association between parental occupational exposure to traumatic events and their children's mental health in families of First Responders (FRs), a neglected area of research. Methods: In 208 families of Israeli FRs, children's symptoms and comorbidity patterns of seven psychiatric disorders were regressed on parental wo...
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Objective: Investigate the following in rescue and cleanup workers exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster 17 years post-fallout: 1) allergic hypersensitivity; 2) spirometry; 3) impulse oscillometry; and 4) the reversibility of airway hyperresponsiveness and distal airways narrowing pre- and post-bronchodilator. Methods: In subjects (n...
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Introduction: Mental health and substance use problems are associated with smoking relapse among former smokers. Yet, little is known about the prevalence of mental health and substance use among former smokers in the U.S. In addition, it is unknown whether the prevalence of these conditions has changed over time as former U.S. smokers have grown...
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Background: In this study, we investigated trends in cannabis use among parents with children at home in the United States and estimated changes in prevalence of any cannabis use and daily cannabis use among parents who identified as cigarette smokers and nonsmokers with children in the home from 2002 to 2015. Methods: The National Survey on Dru...
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Background: This study sought to specify (1) the position of nonmedical prescription opioids (NMPO) in drug initiation sequences among Millennials (1979-96), Generation X (1964-79), and Baby Boomers (1949-64) and (2) gender and racial/ethnic differences in sequences among Millennials. Methods: Data are from the 2013-2014 National Surveys on Drug...
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Background Despite success of public health-oriented tobacco control programs in lowering the smoking prevalence over the past several decades, it is unclear whether similar reductions in smoking have been experienced among pregnant women, especially in vulnerable groups such as those with major depression and/or lower socioeconomic status. Object...
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Introduction: The current study examined the relationship between acute (past 30 day) and recent (past year but not past 30 day) serious psychological distress (SPD) and smoking during pregnancy among women in the United States overall, stratified by demographic characteristics, and described the change in the prevalence of prenatal smoking among...

Citations

... During COVID-19, individuals with pre-existing physical and mental health conditions are at a higher risk of maladaptive food behaviors while under stress. 11 Others have found similar results indicating a higher prevalence of unhealthy eating habits during the pandemic, as well as physical inactivity and mental health impairments. 12,13 J o u r n a l P r e -p r o o f 4 However, it has been reported that those that remain physically active during the pandemic reported lower levels of anxiety. ...
... Some of the iconic Roman bathhouses, typically those situated on the south-facing side of buildings, were sunrooms. Later in the 1200s A.D., ancestors to the Pueblo Native Americans known as the Anasazi situated themselves in south-facing abodes on cliffs to capture the sun's warmth during cold winter months [31][32][33][34].In the late 1700s and 1800s, researchers and scientists had success using sunlight to power ovens for long voyages. They also harnessed the power of the sun to produce solar-powered steamboats. ...
... In a study of Israeli children of ERs and control group of non ER families, Kishon, Geronazzo-Alman [64] found overall that paternal exposure to traumatic events was significantly related to child PTSD symptoms; however, in final models there was a non-significant relationship of paternal ER status and child PTSD symptoms. The authors posit this finding may be due to more firefighters in their sample whose children may have lower levels of PTSD compared to other ER branches, supporting previous studies [61,62]. ...
... Alternatively, it is possible that the WTC exposure led to de novo development of aberrant inflammatory responses, such as an increase in allergic and asthmatic responses described in children exposed to WTC dust [85], in WTC rescue and clean-up workers [86], and suggested in children exposed to outdoor air pollution [87]. Some of the bio-markers that we found to be increased in the WTC categorical variables of more intense exposures, include markers that can be associated with T helper 2 (type 2) responses, for example CCL17/TARC, CCL11/eotaxin [88], MMP12 [89], or VCAM1 [90]. ...
... Besides the significant increase in depression in current smokers, there was also a considerable escalation from non-smokers to former non-smokers [33]. Another study using National Survey on Drug Use and Health data in the United States from 2002-2016 with respondents who were former smokers showed increasing rates of depression, from 4.88% in 2005 to 6.04% in 2016 [34]. ...
... Between 2002 and 2015, specifically among parents with children at home, marijuana use increased from 5% to 7%, while tobacco use decreased from 27% to 20%. A larger increase in marijuana use was seen in those who also smoke tobacco; during the same time period, marijuana use among tobacco smoking parents increased from 11% to 17% (Goodwin et al., 2018). When marijuana and tobacco smoking are combined, the harmful health effects may be potentiated (Macleod et al., 2015). ...
... Adolescents aged 12 to 17 who reported initiation of cannabis or prescription drug misuse during the past year were nearly twice as likely to have a substance use disorder (SUD) than young adults aged 18 to 25 who initiated within the past year [11]. Alcohol and cigarette use preceding initiation of marijuana use remains the most prevalent sequence of drug use onset among youth, but opioid misuse is playing a more prominent role in the development of SUDs among younger generations [12]. Adolescents who engage in simultaneous co-ingestion of opioids and other drugs have greater odds at age 35 of alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, other drug use disorder, and any substance use disorder, relative to those with no history of nonmedical opioid use during adolescence [13]. ...
... In terms of trends, there has been a decrease in alcohol use, smoking, and opioid use during pregnancy (Azagba et al., 2020;Corsi et al., 2020;Hasin et al., 2019;Nechuta et al., 2022), although prenatal cannabis use shows an increase (Young-Wolff et al., 2022). However, the trends in prenatal substance use differed significantly by subgroups, as demonstrated by an increase in smoking among those with a depressive episode (Goodwin et al., 2017), or no significant decrease in opioid use among low income women (Corsi et al., 2020). These substances are well-established risk factors for adverse birth outcomes (Forray & Foster, 2015). ...
... Therefore, mental illness may play an important role on tobacco use, the link has often been taken to reflect a causal relationship, with poor mental health Fig. 1 The relation between the dimensions of learning burnout and the constructs of TPB model toward smoking behavior predisposing to regular tobacco use [34]. This phenomenon was specifically found in White individuals and pregnant women instead of Black or Hispanic individuals [28,35]. ...